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Old 01-18-2005, 01:03 PM   #781
JamesJWeg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vance
I know I don't click in here to check out trim. I think you are doing an excellent job without the chicks. Much prefer the baby and Mom on your bike with you laughing. :-)

V
Same here.

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Old 01-19-2005, 12:44 AM   #782
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Hey Vance, nice to hear from you. The good life of the road can get addictiing--watch out.

For everybody's information: People continually ask what's a good route for a shorter run in foreign lands. For budget traveling and bang for the buck, without a doubt, it's the Middle East.

Ship your bike to Turkey, start in Istanbul and ride through Syria, Jordan, Egypt into Israel and then take a ferry back to Athens. One to three months on fifty bucks a day. Once out of Turkey, gas is less than a buck a gallon and food and hotels are pennies. Fantastic scenery, friendliet people on earth and decent roads. The Sinai was one of the best rides of the journey so far.

The deserts are hard pack and inviting to just take off in As-the-crow-flies- shots toward the next destination. You will only meet fascinating Bedouins and savor solitude. It is the same safety factor as Mexico, lots of great people watching your back but if something does go wrong, it goes radically wrong. Emergency trauma centers are a long ways off.

Of course, the biggest bite is getting the bike to and from Turkey but if factoring this in over a three month ride, it's not bad. (A good reason to stay gone longer) Another option is to rent from companys like ADMO Tours.

If I did Europe again, I would rent a bike in Munich and ride the bargain paradise of Eastern Europe and drop it in Athens. That can be from one to three months also. The food is great and always something unique to study. My partner Brad, basically did this route with me and it worked out great.

Admo provided a new Africa Twin with new chain and tires for about eighty bucks a day and a five hundred dollar drop off fee. This works out good if you want to spend more time riding than clearing Customs and waiting for flight delays on your bike. We hope to do something similar in Thailand. Stay tuned.
All the best amigos
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Old 01-19-2005, 06:34 PM   #783
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strikingviking
For budget traveling and bang for the buck, without a doubt, it's the Middle East.

Ship your bike to Turkey, start in Istanbul and ride through Syria, Jordan, Egypt into Israel and then take a ferry back to Athens. One to three months on fifty bucks a day. Once out of Turkey, gas is less than a buck a gallon and food and hotels are pennies. Fantastic scenery, friendliet people on earth and decent roads. The Sinai was one of the best rides of the journey so far.

[snip]

Of course, the biggest bite is getting the bike to and from Turkey but if factoring this in over a three month ride, it's not bad.
SV,

Agreed on the Middle East. Best people we met on the entire planet. For shipping to Turkey, I highly recommend:
Murat Ayhan

TEKKAR AIRFREIGHT & CLEARING SERVICES Inc.

Istanbul Dünya Ticaret Merkezi, IDTM

A2 Blok Kat 6 No.227 Yesilköy

34149 Istanbul, Turkey

+90 (212) 465 63 06 voice

+90 (212) 465 63 11 fax

email: muratayhan@tekkar.com

For more information on shipping your bike to Turkey and riding in the Middle East, see the "How To" section at: http://www.hackneys.com/travel/index.htm

Enjoy Pak! My wife wasn't keen on venturing over the border from India while we were there.

Be well,
Doug
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Old 01-19-2005, 10:16 PM   #784
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Hey Doug-So far, the Middle East has been the best kept secret in motorcycling but that should change with more reports. I have been trying to reach you through your site but emails are not going through. Can you please contact me direct? locovikingman@yahoo.com

Since I am basically stranded in Karachi with no news about the Blue Beast, I have lots of time to answer reader's questions here or through direct email. It may be slow but a bargain at fifty cents an hour.

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Old 01-19-2005, 10:39 PM   #785
DHackney
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Glen,

You've got mail.

Doug
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Old 01-20-2005, 08:28 AM   #786
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strikingviking
Hey Doug-So far, the Middle East has been the best kept secret in motorcycling but that should change with more reports. I have been trying to reach you through your site but emails are not going through. Can you please contact me direct? locovikingman@yahoo.com

Since I am basically stranded in Karachi with no news about the Blue Beast, I have lots of time to answer reader's questions here or through direct email. It may be slow but a bargain at fifty cents an hour.
Greetings SV:
I've been pecking away at this thread, and just finished your book. Great stuff. I just wanted to hi, and thank you for doing what you are doing. In this forum, at least, you are serving to counter the pernicious influence of the American media, which seems to strive daily to pound the message into our heads that Americans are saintly, and the rest of the world is suspect. Keep us afraid and keep us watching. I work in the media and I know it's largely bullshit. As they say in the biz, news is like hot dogs; once you know how it's made, you don't want to consume it anymore.

But enough of that. Keep keeping on, and I'll keep reading and dreaming of the time when I too can escape the media beast.
RP
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Old 01-20-2005, 09:45 AM   #787
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It's nothing unique to the American media. While traveling, we get access to worldwide TV News by different countries and it's the same all over--slanted coverage. The English, The Germans, the French and the Arabs arrange their presentations to make their respective audiences feel better about themselves. Reports on the Middle East in Europe are the opposite of Amercia's.

But in the end, the American media loves to topple heros, homegrown or others. The advantage to traveling is that you get to see and smell it for yourself untainted by how someone else wants you to think. Our first thoughts when we arrive anywhere we've heard about and wanted to visit--I had no idea it was like this!

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Old 01-20-2005, 12:45 PM   #788
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strikingviking
It's nothing unique to the American media. While traveling, we get access to worldwide TV News by different countries and it's the same all over--slanted coverage. The English, The Germans, the French and the Arabs arrange their presentations to make their respective audiences feel better about themselves. Reports on the Middle East in Europe are the opposite of Amercia's.

But in the end, the American media loves to topple heros, homegrown or others. The advantage to traveling is that you get to see and smell it for yourself untainted by how someone else wants you to think. Our first thoughts when we arrive anywhere we've heard about and wanted to visit--I had no idea it was like this!

I some times watch the Spanish Channel to get their take on the world.While I am not fluent I can pick up the gist of the coverage. Not only is it an intresting perspective, but they report things going on in the US the US media deems not important.
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Old 01-20-2005, 01:03 PM   #789
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strikingviking
It's nothing unique to the American media. While traveling, we get access to worldwide TV News by different countries and it's the same all over--slanted coverage. The English, The Germans, the French and the Arabs arrange their presentations to make their respective audiences feel better about themselves. Reports on the Middle East in Europe are the opposite of Amercia's.
various obscure channels on my Dish Network satellite run Deutche Welles (german news aimed at the UK market), BBC World News, and a BBC summary of AlJazeera (homegrown arabic news). All of these offer interesting perspectives, especially when you can view the same story as presented from different slants.
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Old 01-21-2005, 04:26 AM   #790
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strikingviking
Sadar
January 20, 2005
Karachi, Pakistan

According to Uncle Sam, we should all stay home and prepare for the next terrorist attack. Nothing would make Osama bin Laden happier.
Now there is a big truth
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Old 01-21-2005, 05:59 AM   #791
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What is wrong with me????

Mr. Glen,
Every morning I check and see how you are doing. I have an hour commute to work and I find myself being worried about your well being. (I have 3 daughters, you should think that should be enough to worry about)
I am lining up for your next book already.
Be careful and arrive safe.
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Old 01-21-2005, 07:09 AM   #792
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Just curious, Glen

Glen:
My apologies if you already dealt with this subject somewhere else, but I was wondering how you like the BMW 650 vs. the Kawasaki 650? Has the BMW lived up to its rep of being trouble free?
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Old 01-21-2005, 09:33 AM   #793
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strikingviking
Home, is still just ahead of my front tire ...
Wow. What a line!
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Old 01-21-2005, 09:34 AM   #794
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"Glen:
My apologies if you already dealt with this subject somewhere else, but I was wondering how you like the BMW 650 vs. the Kawasaki 650? Has the BMW lived up to its rep of being trouble free?"


Good question but that's like comparing a Porche to a Volkswagon. You get what you pay for. The KLR 650 is a bargain, but after spending another $2,500 on upgrades, you're close to a Beemer.

The Dakar is heavier but also sturdier with far superior braking even before considering ABS. As a veteran of two major bike wrecks where braking was a factor, I can assure you it's wiser to spend the extra money.

Neither the KLR, nor the Dakar are great offroad bikes but the best for Dual Sporting in general is the Beemer. If it was a choice between KLR and Dakar strictly in the dirt, I'd chose the KLR because it's lighter but on the open road, the Dakar is much faster, more economical and handles better. Yet If magic wands were available, when I hit the dirt, the Blue Beast would turn into KTM and on the tarmac--a 2006 1200GS.

I will always recommend spending your last dollar on safety. A KLR is a great bike for world travel but for safety sake not to exceed 45mph. Although BMW is a sponsor, I had a choice on which brand and model bike to accept for this ride. (I also could have taken a new 1200GS) After lenthy research, all signs pointed to Dakar. I have to add, the Africa Twin is also an awesome piece of machinery.

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Old 01-21-2005, 11:32 AM   #795
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Thanks for this picture of Karachi and its inhabitants.

There are lots of places in this world of which you have images, by reading about it or through pictures (though words always tell me much more); I had no such image of Karachi, and the way you paint the people makes me feel happy.

Somehow, this force that obviously is present in people to be nice, to be friendly, to be curious, seems less strong than politics or the power of money.
But in the end, I think, what makes us human is that force, and it's really great to see in your words that you find it everywhere.
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