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Old 12-23-2008, 03:20 PM   #46
Slope'r OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rapid Dog
...yeah, best to read up a lil before hackin' away, but yo know that...got someone picked out to do the tranny yet?
OK... Just so you don't think I'm lay'in around eating Christmas cookies all day (OK, maybe I am)...

I'm reading up on pulling the clutch (Cylmer, Snowbum etc.) All these big words... I'm getting a headache!

Oh Shit... The cookies are almost gone... Wife's gonna be pissed.

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Old 12-23-2008, 04:29 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slope'r
Hmmmm...This is what I found when looking for the 'V' notch.
At first blush it looks corroded... or maybe it's just crap... won't know until I get a better look.

PO was a hamfist. Maybe the V notch was mistaken for a place to insert a prybar.
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Old 12-23-2008, 06:32 PM   #48
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Laugh

Quote:
Originally Posted by mykill
PO was a hamfist. Maybe the V notch was mistaken for a place to insert a prybar.
OHHH Yeah... No corrosion...No pry bar, just leftover sealant!

Man I would of been surprised if the PO had been into the tranny at 21K.

Looks like a black sealant in the V notch. Cleaned right up

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Old 12-23-2008, 07:42 PM   #49
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The v notch is there for a reason. I believe it is another breather.
If you want to find out where you're swingarm fluid is coming from, fill the final drive with synthetic (red) and normal oil in the gear box. or vice versa.
then see what color fluid is in the swingarm.
It is probably from the input seal of the final drive.
Or just repalce both seals
and be done with it.
robert
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Old 12-23-2008, 08:28 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wirewrkr
The v notch is there for a reason. I believe it is another breather.
The V notch was for the earlier oil bath drive lines. Not sure about this, but I think it was a breather for the drive line. But when the GS came along (with it's dry shaft), the notch wasn't needed or wanted, so the solution was to fill with silicone.
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Old 12-23-2008, 09:18 PM   #51
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Boy does this bring back memories....

I owned a Paris-Dakar for several years, so I think I can comment faithfully and truthfully on your issues.

The notch in the output seal area of the transmission is a carryover from the monolever days. Back then it was no big deal for the transmission to vent to the driveshaft, since it contained oil, anyways. For the then-new paralever, however, that was unacceptable. Thus, the output shaft seal was reversed and silicone was put into the notch to prevent migration of transmission oil into the paralever housing. The manuals are not very clear on this, so pay attention when/if you disassemble the transmission output seal.

The speedometer boot is the most likely source of water entry into the transmission. Second is the breather (the battery grounding bolt). A new boot, along with grease on the inside and a zip-tie on the top side, are a good measure to reduce this hazard. The best solution is to eliminate the mechanical speedo altogether (using an electronic one that takes the speed signal from the front wheel), and inserting a plug in place of the speed cable. Another good modification is the relocate the battery grounding strap to the upper transmission/engine mounting bolt on the right side. You'll need to make a longer ground strap to make it work. For those really into water crossings, you'll want to extend the transmission (and final drive) breather(s) higher on the frame. If the speedo was removed, you can insert a nipple into the plug to connect a hose to route the venting higher on the frame (like around the upper shock bolt, which is higher than the intake snorkels). Also, be sure to use some silicone sealant on the bolt between the airbox and the transmission. If that bolt loosens while riding, the airbox will suck the fluid out of the transmission, leading to very nasty (and expensive) noises.

Oil in the paralever housing only comes from two places, as previously mentioned. The final drive or the transmission. Looking at your pics, I'd guess your case is the transmission. Not really a big deal unless a lot of fluid moves quickly. This is usually accompanied by noise and/or vibration in the drivetrain due to nasty things happening in bearings and such. The oil leaking from the engine does not spoil the clutch plate, so it's repair can be delayed for quite a long time. Transmission oil leaking out of the input shaft, on the other hand, will spoil the friction plate in no time, leading to a slipping clutch. But that seal is also easy to replace once the transmission is removed.

If you wish to remove the flywheel, block the crankshaft per Snowbum. Oil on the rear of the engine case is most likely the crankshaft seal. Not a big deal to fix, but you need to block the crank at the front. The oil pump o-ring seal is one of those things that some think is a good idea, "while you're in there". If it truly is bad, it leaks a lot of oil. Orientation of the flywheel and pressure plate is required to maintain engine balance. Mark the orientations BEFORE removal of the pressure plate.

Your driveshaft being out of phase is showing classic airhead GS symptoms. Depending on your riding style, you may be able to just run it. But, it will vibrate, and induce extra wear onto the transmission and the final drive.

The first and fifth gear mods (and circlip) is a wonderful modification for the airhead GS. Especailly the taller fifth gear. Getting the parts may be troublesome, but once you have them installed, you'll forget about the hassle (and cost). However, the installation can be a trying experience. It is possible for the home mechanic to do it, but you need to take careful precautions. At a minimum, you'll need depth gauges to measure the clearances for the shims. It's tedious. And it requires heat (I used my BBQ) to get the cover to slid back on. If you screw up several times like I did, you will get very good at measuring the clearances and heating the cover.

The older style gray coils are notorious for failure when riding in wet conditions. The Dyna coils work great. Take care to insulate the mounting bolt that is closest to the positive terminal, otherwise you'll get electrical shorts. As for plug wires and caps, I'd recommend OEM. They seal really well. The NGK caps work fine, but water is much easier to introduce, causing ignition shorts. You may be able to use the NGK caps with aftermarket solid wires if you shrink wrap the wire/cap connection. This is only an issue for GS's used in really wet conditions.

Snowbum is an excellent resource, at a minimum a place to start. The airheads mailing list is another great resource. As easy as the bike was to work on, I ended up spending too much time repairing/maintaining things that weren't designed for my riding style. The 950 has fixed that so far.
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Old 12-23-2008, 10:18 PM   #52
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I read with great interest ...

With similar work planned for my 91PD , I am following this thread with keen eyes. Thanks for sharing. Cheers,

Doug...
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Old 12-23-2008, 10:24 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cpt. Ron
I owned a Paris-Dakar for several years, so I think I can comment faithfully and truthfully on your issues.

The notch in the output seal area of the transmission is a carryover from the monolever days. Back then it was no big deal for the transmission to vent to the driveshaft, since it contained oil, anyways. For the then-new paralever, however, that was unacceptable. Thus, the output shaft seal was reversed and silicone was put into the notch to prevent migration of transmission oil into the paralever housing. The manuals are not very clear on this, so pay attention when/if you disassemble the transmission output seal.....snip...

Thanks for this great input... everybody's been really helpful.

Well back to eating Christmas cookies and reading... Tomorrow the clutch!
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Old 12-23-2008, 10:34 PM   #54
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I stand corrected

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slope'r
OHHH Yeah... No corrosion...No pry bar, just leftover sealant!

Man I would of been surprised if the PO had been into the tranny at 21K.

Looks like a black sealant in the V notch. Cleaned right up

Glad to see that, bummer is you still do not know the source of the leak.
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Old 12-23-2008, 10:53 PM   #55
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love you guys-- proof positive that post-69 airheads are nowhere near 'vintage', not when they get used and loved like this for daily service.

Keep them going lads. Airheads truly satisfy. Had a fun argument with a Ducati apologist last weekend.

BMW gets my cash for a reason.
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Old 12-24-2008, 04:27 PM   #56
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Can you hear me now?
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Old 12-26-2008, 11:03 AM   #57
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Question Back to Work... Enough Christmas Cookies

All the Christmas cookies & party mix are gone... time to hit it!

OK... BLOCK THE CRANK was the last order I received so here goes:


Most of what I read said to put something (block of wood, etc) inside the front cover.



But I couldn't find anything that was the right thickness... tried this block of wood but no luck.

Ended up with this set-up, not ideal but I don't think it will let the crank move forward.



Crank is now blocked! Looked at the clutch assembly for factory marks... none found!



So next I marked the Housing cover, pressure plate & flywheel... I used a black marker pen as well as a prick punch.



Oh I forgot... Rotated the crank until pistons were at TDC... per snowbum.



OK, I think I'm ready to pull the clutch but... HOW DO YOU PREVENT the whole assembly from turning when you bear down on these bolts?

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Old 12-26-2008, 11:24 AM   #58
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not sure but couldn't you jamb a block of wood against the teeth of the flywheel??
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Old 12-26-2008, 12:00 PM   #59
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Don't Go There....

There are various ways to restrain your flywheel/clutch assembly. I made a copy of the factory tool - very simple to do. Other people recommend other methods. I have a thread on either page 2 or 3 of 'Old Skool' which goes through the various suggestions. Have fun. Jackd
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Old 12-26-2008, 12:02 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by One Less Harley
not sure but couldn't you jamb a block of wood against the teeth of the flywheel??
Maybe so... may have to if there is no other alternative.

In the meantime I couldn't pass up a deal on a new clutch plate from inmate Zagando (clicky)
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