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View Results: Hard Panniers & Broken Legs: What's the deal?
I have personally seen (or had) broken legs due specifically to hard panniers. 24 8.96%
I have never seen (or had) this happen. 244 91.04%
Voters: 268. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-09-2009, 08:28 AM   #31
Dorian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikerd400
When we practice, we start on stripped down bikes. It the beginning, riders will always dab their foot. However, the more you think about it, and remember not to put your foot down, the easier it becomes. Everyday, whether it is riding my GS ot my RT-P, I remind myself to not put my foot down.
I practiced and competed in observed trials for several years where you learn to keep your feet on the pegs to avoid penalty points for "dabbing". That experience (also helping to improve balance, throttle control etc) has made me a better rider (relatively speaking) on and off-road. Therefore, the only time your feet left the pegs was to avoid a fall (and self-preservation). Surely keeping your feet on the pegs is always a good technique. So I always ride with my feet on the pegs. It's just that when off-roading, I tend to "dab" (reflex) as a last resort to avoid (not always successful) a fall and possible injury. Whenever I'm off-roading I try to do it without the Zega cases on my GS because a) I want "room" to dab in technical sections if needed and b) I don't want to suffer a leg injury due to the hard cases.

I guess I need to re-wire my brain/reflexes to keep feet on pegs no matter what. Good luck with that (I say to myself).
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Old 01-09-2009, 03:19 PM   #32
mikerd400
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorian
I guess I need to re-wire my brain/reflexes to keep feet on pegs no matter what. Good luck with that (I say to myself).
That's the hard part. When riding my KLR (no panniers) I'll tend to put a foot out while off road. I have to constantly remind my not to do it on the GS. But you are right, training your brain/reflex is hard to do.
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Old 01-09-2009, 03:24 PM   #33
Stillupright
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikerd400
Yes panniers break legs. When I was in motor school, for law enforcement, they would yell at us for putting a foot down. Basically, if the bike is going down, keep your feet on the foot pegs and let it go down. Trying to put a foot down and saving it, may cause your leg to get sucked back under the pannier.
The only time I have crashed (on a road bike) I was riding a 1991 ST1100 with the stock hard bags. I low sided at about 20 MPH on a decreasing radius curve, slid off the road into a rock wall and bounced back onto the road. If I was not lying on my side, I would have still been in a good riding position, with both feet on the pegs and hanging on to the handle bars for all I was worth. No broken bones, but bruised from above my boots to above the hip. So not every rider's reflexes result in putting the foot down The bags were both knocked off by the impact, so I don't think they saved my body too much from the trauma.
Leather pants and jacket saved my skin and an Arai helmet kept my head intact
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Old 03-22-2009, 03:06 PM   #34
BMWslc
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I broke my leg in two places a couple of years back in a nasty sand/GS/Jesse Bag debacle. I put my foot down out of instinct, the bike started to turn, and the bag hit my leg from behind and I heard the crack.
That being said, I still wouldn't trade the Jesse's for any other luggage. They are bombproof, lockable, and waterproof; qualities that outweigh the risk of succumbing to my own stupidity. Stupid has a tendency to hurt. I don't blame the bags, just the idiot on the bike!
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Old 09-07-2013, 10:20 AM   #35
drtmvr
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Hard Panniers

Yea they'll break you're leg, but they're great for reducing the swelling!
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Old 09-07-2013, 10:26 AM   #36
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Old 09-08-2013, 08:20 AM   #37
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Cry

I have HT boxes and they have saved me, buddy dropped his dirt bike no bags or boxes broken leg. I think there is a lot more to the outcome than just the bag or box debate.
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Old 09-08-2013, 08:09 PM   #38
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Hard Panniers, don't leave home without them.
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Old 09-09-2013, 02:15 AM   #39
mickmo
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I dropped my Aprillia in wet clay, with new soft panniers that I was not used to, came within a bee's dick of breaking my ankle I reckon, plus the added joy of being pinned underneath. Not good.
It all comes down to being aware of the hazard and working with it though.
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Old 09-11-2013, 12:43 PM   #40
El Forko
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After 6 months of dropping my bike in various parts of S America with hard panniers, I have switched to soft. With hard, I got a nice twisted knee and a couple of close calls on the 'trapped legs' front

A few people in this thread have highlighted that hard panniers hold the bike up in when it's dropped. So do well-packed soft panniers. Yes, they compress a bit and any breakables inside may get bust, but a bit of compression may be no bad thing is you drop the bikes several times on hard ground - reducing the shock loading through the pannier frames. As for avoiding things getting bust - just pack carefully with this in mind.

You should have seen my Zegas after a few impacts on rocky ground. They sure weren't waterproof by then! And as for my buddy's Zegas - the bottom fell out of one after he went down several times on a very muddy Ruta 40.
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Old 09-11-2013, 12:49 PM   #41
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Me personally no, but while teaching someone to ride off road (and I TOLD him to do it without the panniers the first time) I got to witness first hand how he put a foot down and the pannier caught him in the back of the leg.

Caused a huge bruise but due to being in sand his foot was able to be drug along instead of being planted in the ground.

I wont say never run the hard bags but personally I would never run a set based on my experiences (off road that is).
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:19 AM   #42
LuciferMutt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryoheart View Post
......but them big shanny 'luminim cans is shore purdy....

Actually they look like ass, but YMMV.
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Old 09-13-2013, 07:15 PM   #43
DAKEZ
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The 7 deadly sins of hard bags

http://www.europeanmotorcycle-diarie...-for-they.html
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Old 09-13-2013, 09:12 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RideDualSport.com View Post
Hard Panniers, don't leave home without them.
I think I would leave more than half of that shit home.
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Old 09-13-2013, 09:22 PM   #45
DAKEZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloorPoor View Post
I think I would leave more than half of that shit home.
Starting with that back breaker of a top box.
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