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Old 02-07-2009, 11:16 AM   #1
itsatdm OP
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Hyde skid plate for the 800gs

Keeping with my penney tech mods to my 800GS I purchased one of these from http://www.hyderacing.com/adventure_bikes.htm.
To be honest I was not that impressesed once it arrived. I was forwarned by the retailer that this was not the skidplate for the gnarley adventureer traversing rocky trails. Out of the box, it is designed mostly to protect the engine and pipes from gravel thrown up from the front wheel. Slicker than snot, it does have enough flex that collison with a large rock could result in impact with whatever it is protecting. It is form fitting giving a little more ground clearance but it is even shorter in the rear over the stock plastic skid plate.
Not intentionaly planning to run over big rocks, I thought it might do if beefed up a little.
I added a 1/8 piece of aluminum on the bottom that goes part way up the front and extends past the end of the skid plate.
Slathered in silicon and attached with a few screws it is secured tightly to the bottom of the skid plate.



Attachment is through the 4 existing bottom BMW mounts plus 1 side mount into one of the existing engine bosses on the left side already occupied by my crash bar mount. The front mount is eliminated.




Wanting to keep the engine crash bars, I shortened the bar spacers, drilled a second mount on the right side, cut some of interfering plastic and sandwiched the side mounts between the crash bar mounts and the engine block.
The rubber knobby thingys I think are used to protect the pipes if the plate is smashed into them. On my application only one touches the pipe and they don't melt or burn.
The mod really stiffens the skid plate. The area in front of the oil filter and cooler is very stiff. The bottom has no flex at all and will support the bike on a jack. A little flex in front of the pipe.
This is not my only bike, and I intend to ride it on roads less traveled. The key word is roads. With 9.5" of ground clearance under the plate I think this will handle what I aim to try.

itsatdm screwed with this post 02-07-2009 at 07:26 PM
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Old 02-07-2009, 06:38 PM   #2
O-Man
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F800gs Skid Plate

Can you tell me how the stock F800 plastic skid plate attaches to the engine? Are there rubber or plastic spacers at the four mounting bolts between the engine and plate. If so appx how thick are they. I have a new F650GS and got hold of a plastic plate off an F800, but am not sure how it attaches. I plan to modify it by adding an aluminum plate to the front to cover the filter and cooler. I think this will work for me also as I don't plan on bouncing off any rocks with this bike. I just want more protection from gravel roads. Thanks.
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Old 02-07-2009, 07:24 PM   #3
itsatdm OP
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On the 800 there are 4 bottom mounts. The bottom mounts are made of rubber? with a threaded rod on both ends. 1 end screws into the engine block,the skid plate is placed over the other end and secured with a nut. I didn't measure them, but probably 1&1/2" long.
The front mount has a long threaded bolt that passes through some mounting bosses on the engine and the bracket on the skid plate.
I would bet the 650 has all the mounting points, just need the hardware with the skidplate.
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Old 02-08-2009, 09:13 AM   #4
O-Man
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F800 Skid Plate

The 650 has the same mounting points and thats about how I thought it mounted. Think I will just get some plastic spacers and bolt it onto the engine and then attach my aluminum plate to the skid plate with short bolts. Thanks for the info.
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Old 02-08-2009, 05:27 PM   #5
]I)Money
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Quote:
Originally Posted by O-Man
The 650 has the same mounting points and thats about how I thought it mounted. Think I will just get some plastic spacers and bolt it onto the engine and then attach my aluminum plate to the skid plate with short bolts. Thanks for the info.
IF you are going to do stuff that might NEED a skidplate, then buy the rubber mounts. They isolate the plate from the engine block. If you use a straight bolt, then a hard hit could easily jam one of those bolts hard enough to crack your case.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:12 PM   #6
robhar54
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Question

Nice adaptation...but...some of the other Hyde Racing Skidplates (like the one for the Xchallenge) are designed to go OVER the OEM skidplate. That is, mounted on the bottom of the OEM one, in addition to it. Are you sure the one for the F800GS isn't this way?

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Old 02-09-2009, 10:21 PM   #7
itsatdm OP
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Yes. That was my first thought too, but no way will it fit over the existing plate.
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Old 02-11-2009, 07:48 AM   #8
bald1Rides
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Not saying your mod is unnecessary, I have no idea where/how you ride. I've got one of these on my Wee and it works quite well without any additional armouring up. I've thrown up "baby-head" sized rocks from the front wheel to smack that sucker and the only effect was a small light coloured mark that disappeared in about a week (residue from the rock I suppose).

I don't ride any real off-road though. I stick to forest service roads and gravel roads (and of course all the other roads). The DL is a road bike after all, even if that road IS covered in bear-poo. I'm also not the kind of guy with the skills to loft a big heavy over a log - you may be, in which case... Good on ya, Brutha!
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Old 02-11-2009, 01:34 PM   #9
itsatdm OP
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I don't disagree, always felt it easier to go around a boulder than over, and if it gets rougher than that, get another tool. Not above sliding off a ledge though and the 7 bucks it cost me seemed like cheap insurance.
No center stand on the bike. To remove the front tire or suspension I use a bike stand on the rear and jack up the front with a car jack under the skid plate. I think its now stiff enough to still use that method.
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Old 02-12-2009, 01:30 PM   #10
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I've got one of these coming, and can't wait to see it myself. It may be I will do something similar in terms of beefing it up, but hadn't planned on needing to.

A friend who rides all sorts of dirt & adventure machines harder than I am likely to recommended the Hyde guards highly, but perhaps the pieces they make for more MX-Enduro-type bikes are tougher. The GS 800 piece is large and can't help but be flexible outboard of the mounts. I am thinking that even if it does get pushed in against the case or pipe it's guarding, it should still offer a lot of protection.

I still hope to be happy with it even stock, as my primary concern was with protecting the oil filter & cooler. I don't picture myself pulling any sort of David Knight moves on this bike.

I also like the look of the thing, most welded up aluminum skid plates are not pretty imho.

Come on, UPS!
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Old 02-19-2009, 01:46 PM   #11
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I got the guard and mounted it up last night. I had to do some filing to get the 4 OEM mounting bolts on the bottom of the engine to line up with the holes in the plate. As delivered it would not fit. The hole on the left side of the engine where the plate is supposed to mount to a threaded boss on the engine case did not line up at all at first. Finally a combination of filing and brute force got it done. Not a perfect fit as delivered. The thing does hug the contours of the engine pretty nicely.

Now that I have the thing bolted to my bike, I think it is plenty stout enough for anything I am likely to ask of it. Obviously, the bottom part is the stiffest, and the further you get out to the edges the more flex there is, but I think it would take an awfully hard hit to compromise it to the point where it would allow critical damage. It would be possible to fabricate a replacement set of ears to interface with the front mounting point that the OEM plate uses and the Hyde one does not. Could be tough to reach in there with wrenches when installing the plate though, it wraps pretty snugly around the engine.

Some thing I noted while installing: All the OEM nuts on the BMW skid plate were extremely loose! It might be wise to check on those from time to time. My dealer has had that plate off once to replace my oil cooler, which arrived with shipping damage when the bike was delivered. At that time they lost some of the bronze colored bushings in the skid plate, so perhaps they were not scrupulous in tightening the nuts either.

The OEM plate has nicely thought out indentations that catch the corners of the rubber 'silent blocks' that isolate the plate from the oil pan. These things are prone to shearing off if too much torque is applied to fasteners at either end, so the OEM plate stops the rubber from twisting. A good idea, and something to remember when bolting on aftermarket skid plates. Go easy with the tightening and the locktite.
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Old 03-09-2009, 01:40 PM   #12
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Once the bash plate had been bolted to my bike for a while, it seemed to adjust it's self so it fit better. Perhaps it was a bit warped when I got it and the heat of the engine helped it regain it's proper shape. Whatever, when I had to take it off and replace it a few times while fitting the Holan crash bars all it's holes lined up much more easily than when I first installed it.
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Old 04-27-2009, 01:47 PM   #13
Singletrack_mind
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Tested the skid plate yesterday, got high centered sometime before, during or after a modest crash in some rocky stuff. The skidplate did just what it was supposed to, although I will say I've already torn one of the little silicone nubbins off. I bought the thing to fend off flying rocks, but here I am, fourth major ride in dirt, and getting stuck on top of big rocks. Maybe they were good intentions, not rocks. I hear the road is paved with 'em.
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