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Old 02-08-2009, 03:34 PM   #31
Infracaninophile OP
Finding My Way..
 
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Joined: Sep 2001
Location: New England, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bgoodsoil
I read somewhere that they add air after the exhaust side to dilute the exhaust gases. Emissions are based on parts per million. With the air injection you're still dumping the same amount of junk into the atmosphere, but it looks like you're running cleaner--genius. And we end up with more garbage in our landfills after we yank it out and throw it away. Someone removed mine before I got the bike but left all the junk in the airbox so I had to finish the removal process. I've never heard anyone say it was worth keeping OR that it hurts anything to remove it.

I get the feeling we're muddying up his nice clean rebuild thread, sorry!
No, I want input for the thread. I'm going to leave all the plumbing there for the time being. I'm sure it's not really needed.

T.
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Old 02-08-2009, 03:37 PM   #32
Infracaninophile OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bgoodsoil
whoa. go big or go home! I've never used my hayne's manual during my rebuild. This forum is an order of magnitude better. Some of the torque specs in the book (cylinder studs) can't be trusted. Looks good on the desk though. Look at it like this--you didn't buy a crappy book, you bought an awesome coaster!

I'm really looking forward to this thread because of the meticulous way you seem to go through things and document them. I wouldn't be surprised if one day people won't surf through 20 different threads on different topics, they buy a new bike then go through this thread. I hope ya'll have a long hard winter up there.

Oh, and I chased carb problems for a coupla weeks then found out it was the original plug wires. Yours look cracked in the same way mine were. The stockers are really well made.

Don't forget the radio. Tunes and wrenches are pure bliss.
B:

I have new plugs, wires, and air filter sitting on the bench now. I saw the cracks as well and want to eliminate anything that may cause issues. These will get changed right up front after fluids.

Radio and tunes already in the garage.

T.
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Old 02-08-2009, 03:38 PM   #33
Infracaninophile OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdiaz
I've never used anything but straight Spectro or Valvoline 80w90 in our BMW final drives for 500+K miles.
Thanks. Some folks do.

Tom
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Old 02-08-2009, 04:12 PM   #34
WooPig
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One last interruption from me to say THANK YOU. This is just outstanding.
And man, I thought I was compulsive. Your book puts mine to shame.
All that record keeping will be a huge advantage to the next owner too, even if it's your grandson.
On the Antiques Road Show, they call that "provenance". Provenance and patina, that's what I learned there. I gots me plenty of patina.
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Old 02-08-2009, 04:31 PM   #35
monzablue
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Location: Wilson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infracaninophile
Still not sure what the metal o-ring is for. The one at the lower right:
The small silver crush washer is for the oil drain bolt. Makes sense. And the two small brass crush washers go into the thermostat. I am not sure if I have one of these or not. Where is it?

thanks,

tom
The metal shim goes in right after the filter is put in place. It is supposed to ensure that the white o-ring gets a good seal and prevents oil from bypassing the filter. Search for snowbum's site and look at Anton's photos - you don't want to get that part wrong. Snowbum even recommends against using the paper gasket on the cover because it further prevents the white o-ring from sealing properly. I followed his advice.

Unless someone modded your GS, you won't have a thermostat. Discard the brass crush washers.
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Old 02-08-2009, 04:34 PM   #36
monzablue
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Here's a link to Snowbum's article on filter changes, which includes a link to Anton's photos on the subject.

http://bmwmotorcycletech.info/Oil.htm
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Old 02-08-2009, 04:44 PM   #37
datchew
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Location: Savannah - the dirty south
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infracaninophile
Okay, I did warn you. I'm obsessive.
Um, yah.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Infracaninophile
I have not yet figured out how to snap a copy of an AdvRider thread into a format that I can save as a document. When I do, I'll snag them and print them off as well. Many many of the threads here on seals, forks, etc.. are all very important to me. Does anyone know how to do this?

Tom
It's not quick and easy, but you can copy/paste the whole damn page into word or similar and edit out the garbage. Then, once you have the format all cleaned up, print it to a pdf file and voila.



ps. This has odds of competing with that KLR guy that showed his analysis work to build a gasket for a light or something.
But hey, it's like days of our lives for airheads. I'm loving it.
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Old 02-08-2009, 05:13 PM   #38
bgoodsoil
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I didn't know KLR owners could read. huh. learn something new every day.
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Old 02-08-2009, 05:18 PM   #39
Infracaninophile OP
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Location: New England, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackd
Seems to be the way that people often buy these GS's sight unseen - especially if it's from another Forum member. The physical description and the maintenance history is often enough to clinch the deal. I also bought mine sight unseen (and not from a Forum member) - except for the viewing by my wife who happened to be travelling in the area that the bike was listed. She came back and reported "yup it's a bike". There were so few being listed in these parts at the time that I jumped on it and paid asking price and beat out what I remember were 18 other contenders. The bike was not as good as the pics showed or described, even though it had a complete maintenance history. I've been at it for 2 years now putting it where I want it to be.

I always enjoy seeing new owners who have come from the 'oilhead' realm and who have come back to the airhead for the simplicity. I also like seeing the younger crowd getting involved, who see the value in these machines from possibly the same standpoint. Good luck with your bike, Tom. I'll follow this thread with regularity. Okay coffee break is over - back to the final drive installation on my GS.
Jack:

Glad to have you aboard. In between the oilheads I had a KTM 950. Great bike but not (IMHO) easy to work on. I wanted a slow, old, reliable bike that could be wrenched on by the side of the road. Simple is good. And, I really don't need to go all that fast all the time. An airhead will slow you down.

Over the next 3 years I'd like to do some big trips: Baja and Copper Canyon again, Nova Scotia and Labrador, and Alaska. I did a 3 months Alaska trip 2 years ago but took my truck. Now I want to do it on a bike. The airhead GS should be just the ticket.

T.
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Old 02-08-2009, 05:36 PM   #40
HowdyDoody
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Location: Lancaster, PA
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In deep TOO

Great find and start of a fun story! I just bought a 1992 this last Fall and have been slowly fixing and tweaking with the help of this site! Good luck on all your recoveries and enjoy the ride!
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Old 02-08-2009, 05:46 PM   #41
robsmoto
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Location: Columbus, Ohio
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A question was raised about use of Moly in the transmission oil...

I've been using Dow Gear Guard M for close to 15 years in my airheads and oilhead. I use it with non-synthetic transmission oil (usually Valvolene or Castrol 80W-90). I use the Moly in both the rear drive and transmission. Dow calls for the Moly to be added at 5% by volume (which means a couple of squirts for me :)

I've noticed the biggest difference with my R60/6. After the Moly had been in the transmission for about 50 miles the shifting felt smoother. The shifting on my 93 GS/PD has always felt pretty smooth (for a BMW!).

More information on Dow Gear Guard M is below (taken from a posting that I made on the AirList in 2005) The links are still good -

Here is the link for the distributor look-up from dow:
http://www.dowcorning.com/applicatio...earchtype=prod

or

http://tinyurl.com/97lat

Product info is at:
http://www.dowcorning.com/applicatio...ROD&notag=true

or

http://tinyurl.com/9skd6

And also below is a cut and paste of relevant info that I've archived.
-------------------------------------------
Call Dow Corning in Midland Michigan. They will tell you the
closest distributor to your location. The number is: 1-800-248-2481. When
you call, say you want to talk to a technical support person about their
lubricants, don't talk to the bloody general operator, they don't know
anything ;) And the product is called M-Gear Guard, also known as
Molykote. Cost was about $22 a quart from my distributor, as I recall.
Mix it per Dow's instructions: 3 to 5% with Dino-oil, it is NOT compatible
with ANY synthetic oil. Also, don't put it in the crankcase! Final drive
and transmission only.
Call Dow-Corning at their toll free number (1-800-248-2481)
If you call Dow and give them your Zip code, they can look up the local
supplier for you.
A quart runs for $24.57 Apparently
some places don't stock it on the shelf, but they can usually get it
the next day from their warehouse. They know the product as
Dow M Gear Oil Additive.


Alternatives to Dow Gear Guard M
-------------------------------
If you want to avoid the hassle of acquiring the Gear Guard,
which can be problematic, you can acquire Schaeffer's 267
Moly Universal Supreme gear lube directly from the
manufacturer:
Schaeffer Manufacturing Company
St. Louis, MO
1-800-325-9962
The product is:
Schaeffer's 267 Moly Universal Supreme, 80W-90
59.40 USD per case (of 12 US quarts)
-----------------------------
Lubro-Moly MoS2 Anti-Friction for Gears
>From the tube:
Concentrated Moly treatment for manual transmissions, transaxles, rear
axles. Reduces gear noise and whine, smoothens shifting. Protects gears
from pitting, scuffing, binding, overloading. Reduces friction and wear.
1 Tube treats 2.5 quarts of your favorite gear oil.
Part Number 13476 - $6.95 a tube. Available from
Parts Place Inc.
2300 N. Opdyke
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
(248) 373-2300 - sorry, no 800 number...
Fax: (248) 373-5950
They ship UPS - they take plastic.
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Old 02-08-2009, 06:05 PM   #42
robsmoto
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For my 93 GS/PD I'm going to be doing the following in the near future:

- Swapping transmissions - I bought a GS transmission on e-bay that was advertised as having the circlip on the output shaft. I've disassembled the transmission and the circlip is there. I'll be renewing a couple of bearings while I'm in there. Once out the original transmission will be disassembled and I'll have a slot cut for a circlip.

- Swapping driveshafts - I've already purchased a re-built driveshaft that has zirc fittings to allow grease to be injected into the u-joint bearings. I'll have the original driveshaft rebuilt with either zirc fittings or a circlip for easy removal and greasing of the bearings. Some while back I started putting a wee bit of chain lube in the swingarm to keep some lube on the driveshaft. I met a fellow from Cleveland with a GS with over 100k miles with the original driveshaft. He had an oil leak that allowed oil to enter the swingarm and kept his driveshaft "oiled" (like the driveshafts in airheads of yore).

- Replacing the paralever bearing with a bushing. Seems the bearing was under designed for the application and is prone to failure. Paul Glaves has written about this in the MOA ON. The bushings are available from either Ted Porter or Tom Cutter. Porter's website is:
http://tinyurl.com/benoft
Tom Cutter's website is:
http://rubberchickenracinggarage.com/

I haven't removed the pulse air injection - yet. I may someday.

My GS/PD is getting fitted for stainless exhaust headers and exhaust from EPCO. (I think that my GS/PD is getting the first one).
http://www.epcostainless.com/

I replaced the stock rear shock with a Wilburs a couple of years back when AdvRiders had a "GS group buy".

I like Corbin saddles on my BMWs - I found a good used one for my PD. I have a tall Parabellum windshield which I like much more than I though that I would. I have the stock BMW bags. If I was to do it again, I'd get the Jesse aluminum bags. A key reason being that I can more easily move the Jesse bags from the PD to the Tiger or other future bike(s) that I may someday get.
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Old 02-08-2009, 06:11 PM   #43
jackd
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MIght Work.

I never thought of an oil leak actually improving the health of the drive shaft, but it just might work. I'm milking my shaft out for another season before it goes for rebuild. Budgeted for next winter.
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Old 02-08-2009, 07:00 PM   #44
kalispell365
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Location: hungry horse,montana
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hellooooo there tom!
i am feeling better than ever about selling you my old bike! you were THE person for it,meant to be! i see its going well for you,dont mind the red subaru fujibond on the oil filter gasket,i had to remove the cover a second time to be sure all the 53 pieces were in the oil filter correctly...i just wanted to be safe,that sealer was used on many of my customers cars in colorado,works great.
so,heres what i know about the bike:
i bought it from a stock broker type dude who was currently in tampa florida,the bike as well as he were originally from l.a.,ca.i never met him,i did the deal with his banker here in whitefish and his secretary in florida.he gave me the code to his vacation mansion on big mountain,which was where the bike was.he was a character,and requested that i start up his jeep while i was there to keep the battery fresh,its nice how trusting folks are here,i doubt he would have behaved the same if i also was in florida.i heard about the bike from a word of mouth deal(keep in mind,i live in rural n.w. montana...) when i bought it,it was complete,original,but neglected.
i trailered it home,started studying about the details that needed replacing,were missing,etc.many small bits were freshened up or replaced as i also am a little knitpicky.it was just too nice of a bike to abuse up here in my travel area which is beautiful,but hard on bikes.i only rode it a total of 46 miles in total up into glacier national park,then put it away for the winter.i also am somewhat smaller than tom,as is obvious in the earlier picture...keep in mind i ride a f650 that is worn like a comfy old set of tennis shoes.ironically,Tom knew all the history on my personal ride as it is from colorado springs,that was crazy! anyway,i fixed it up to as correct and original as possible.tom,i wish i had more info on the tranny,but what i told you is all i know,i cant even find the guys name that i bought it from.he wasnt very knowledgable anyway.
tom,
the bike looks so very nice and loved,i now feel bad having left it in my dirty garage for all that time.

kalispell365 screwed with this post 02-08-2009 at 07:30 PM
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Old 02-08-2009, 07:10 PM   #45
squish
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Originally Posted by bgoodsoil
I read somewhere that they add air after the exhaust side to dilute the exhaust gases. Emissions are based on parts per million. **SNIP**

I get the feeling we're muddying up his nice clean rebuild thread, sorry!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Infracaninophile
No, I want input for the thread. I'm going to leave all the plumbing there for the time being. I'm sure it's not really needed.

T.
Air injection systems work by dumping fresh air into the exhaust tract
down stream of the combustion chamber. This fresh air mixed with the heat of combustion helps to burn any remaining unburned hydrocarbons.
This is why it blues exhaust pipes and makes some bikes run hotter.

By removing it you are making your bike run cooler but it sends more bad pollution into the atmosphere.
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