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Old 04-24-2009, 07:36 AM   #526
Infracaninophile OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenB
I believe the bushing is a protective measure so that the aluminum of the damper rod and the area of the forkleg where it is supported don't get damaged. The damper rod has sharp edges the way it is manufactured and the bushing also provides a larger contact area between damper rod and fork leg. It is there for a reason otherwise it wouldn't be there. Whether I got it right is another question ;-)

Of course it all buttons up, the fork spring takes the slack if any.
Stephen:

I agree it should be there for a reason. But, at least on my bike and on the Clymer's manual, the Left leg does not have this bushing. The ends of the damper rod are not sharp on my bike. They look chamfered.

T.
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Old 04-24-2009, 07:45 AM   #527
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I looked at the detailed drawings: one damper rod was straight and had the bushing (RH), the other was actually conical and chamfered (LH), providing that extra footprint. And my memory seem to support that! So you're all set!
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Old 04-24-2009, 01:13 PM   #528
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Solo had a good idea for adjusting the turns that Datchew told me when I put mine in.

You can get an extendable magnet, kinda like those rabbit ear antennas for TVs, from the autoparts store for about a buck. If you want to adjust the Gold Valve remove the fork cap and spring, stick the magnet down the tube and pull it out. Adjust and drop it all back in place. That way you don't have to pull apart the whole front end or drain fork oil.
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Old 04-24-2009, 02:40 PM   #529
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Stuck again

Today I'm working on replacing the steering head bearings. I got the old races out using Jeff's tool. Nice. But I can't figure out how to get the old bearings out of the top piece or the bottom. On the top it's stuck to the adjusting piece. On the bottom, it is stuck to the steering stem.

Manual says for the lower one I need to get someone to press the steering stem out and then remove the bearing. Then insert a new cup and bearing. Is that true? If so, I am going to have to find a shop.

On the top, I can't see how to get the bearing to drop out. I cleaned it and tapped it but it's not coming out.

Picture of Top Bearing:




Pictures of bottom bearing stuck on steering stem:






Tom

Infracaninophile screwed with this post 04-24-2009 at 02:59 PM
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Old 04-24-2009, 03:11 PM   #530
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I cut my bottom bearing off with a Dremel. Just be careful not to nick the stem.
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Old 04-24-2009, 03:21 PM   #531
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If you look closely at the top one, on the knurled adjuster there are two holes... use a punch through those and you will drive the bearing race off of the adjuster...

For the bottom, most folks use a hydraluic press and push the stem through the lower triple just until the bearing is off of the tapered part of the shaft, then push the new one on using heat/cold, a long section of pipe and the press again..

The other way is to screw on the top nut, use a piece of brass or alu as a spacer and beat the living s**t out of the stem to drive it down, having used this method before myself I would say it isn't very much fun...

good luck!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stagehand
your bike is suitably dirty. Well done.
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Old 04-24-2009, 03:30 PM   #532
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This might be of help :

http://www.garagenight.tv/ep-5-repla...head-bearings/
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Old 04-24-2009, 04:23 PM   #533
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giacomo
Brilliant!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stagehand
your bike is suitably dirty. Well done.
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Old 04-24-2009, 04:59 PM   #534
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that was great and very helpful. now i feel the need to buy some red coveralls.

Quote:
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Brilliant!
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Old 04-24-2009, 05:19 PM   #535
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I'm installing a gold valve this weekend. The bushing question has me concerned. I'm hesitant to leave it out without a bunch of people chiming in with their experiences. I might feel differently once I pull the guts out and take a look at them.
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Old 04-24-2009, 05:37 PM   #536
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giacomo
Somehow I got the feeling that the pressfit of the BMW races is tighter. I had to heat the steering head and freeze the races to be able to assemble them with the same amount of force that the guys seem to have used.
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Old 04-24-2009, 09:22 PM   #537
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Fork Rebuild - Fork Slider First

This post will deal with the fork rebuild of both forks sliders. They are both exactly the same. I will then do the fork tubes and then the Gold valve in subsequent posts.

I had previously removed my forks and taken both of them apart to check for damage, etc.. My forks were performing fine and had no leaks but I wanted to find the cause of a "clunk" sound I think was coming from one of them. I also wanted to learn how to rebuild then.

While I was there scope creep came into play and I ended up replacing every single wear part in both forks. Normally when someone is going to rebuild their forks it is because they have a leaky fork seal. That's a pretty minor repair.

Shown is the picture below are the parts you would need if you were just doing your basic minimalist freshening. The first two parts under the Fork Slider are all that you would really need. These are the fork seal and the dust shield. In fact, you might just need the fork seal as you don't hurt the dust cover when removing it.




This next picture shows all of the parts that I ordered. I was going to play it safe and assume some/all of the parts in my forks were toast. This would include both bushings, the fork seal, dust shield, and other parts.




My goal was to rebuild the forks and not have to worry about them for a long time.

I'm sure you all knew this but rebuilding your forks is actually not hard at all. It requires just basic tools and some patience. Oh, the Clymer's Manual came in very handy to ensure you put the parts in the right order and put the parts with the right end facing the right way.

Let's just break the rebuild down: You freshen a few parts in the fork slider (the lower piece, normally painted, mine are yellow) and some pieces in the fork tube, the shiny part. The picture below shows the slider in the rear and the fork tube in the front.

Let's start with the fork slider. You need to remove a few pieces and replace a few pieces. The important parts I wanted to replace were the inside metal bushing, the fork seal, and the dust shield. I also replaced the flat washer but did not need to.

All of these components are at the top end of the slider and fit inside like the picture below. There's a snap ring to remove, then the fork seal, then a flat washer, and then the metal bushing.




Remove the snap ring by using a pointy object like an awl to get one end of it out of the groove it lives in. Once that is done you just work it all the way around until it is out. It's not easy but is just one of those things you have to work at.






Once that is done you remove the fork seal very carefully. I learned to use a wide flat screwdriver. Place something soft like a rag or a glove over the edge of the slider and then working around the edge, pry the fork seal out but putting the flat edge down in the space and turning it sideways. Just keep working around the perimeter and it will pop right out. Do not damage the edge of the slider.








Next to come out is a flat washer that has a funny lip. Just use a hook or something to pull it out. A magnet might work as well. It just sits in there.




Next comes the metal bushing. It comes out easily. I used a little probe with a 90 degree end on it to just snag it and lift it out.








You have now removed all of the parts from the top of the fork slider. Make sure to clean and inspect the inside of the slider. Remove any dirt or sharp edges.

Now we'll put fresh ones in there. Again, I was replacing all of the parts. Most people do not need to do this. Just put the new parts in reverse order of removing the old. First goes the new metal bushing.




I applied a coat of fork oil on all of the new parts as I put them in.






Just slide the new bushing in place. Don't force it.




Then the new flat washer with the lip up like this






Next goes the new fork seal. Be sure you get the part with the spring facing down.








After pressing it in place I pressed it in with an old flat washer and socket. A few gentle taps and it was seated. You don't need to pound it.








Once it is set don't forget to pull the washer out that was used under the socket to make a better fit. Picture with washer still in there.




Washer now removed. You can see the fork seal all set.




Next in goes the snap ring. I used a new one. I learned to place one end of it right in the groove. Then work it around all the way. Then use a hammer and punch to tap it on the end to ensure it's in the groove.




This picture shows the new snap ring in the groove.




That's all there is with this end. One little freshening at the other end of the slider. I replaced the small o-ring at the drain plug. Simple, takes 10 seconds.














That's it for the fork slider. Next up, the fork tube and reassembly.

Infracaninophile screwed with this post 04-24-2009 at 09:40 PM
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Old 04-24-2009, 09:23 PM   #538
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Fork Tube

My fork tube was already disassembled. First I needed to replace the metal bushing that goes on the outside of the lower leg piece.

Picture of old bushing in place with new bushing to the right.




Just slide the old bushing off by expanding it a bit and slide the new one in place.







I wanted to freshen the big o-ring that goes on the fork tube cap.






Done.




That's it for now for the fork tube. Next, the gold valve.

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Old 04-24-2009, 09:23 PM   #539
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Gold Valve

I think I spent more time researching this than anything else I've done on my bike. There are a ton of threads here with lots of different opinions on which leg, how much oil, what kind of oil, how many holes, yaddie yaddie. I am just going to state what I did.

Okay, what I learned and decided:

1. On a 1993 R100GS you only need one gold valve. Find someone to split a set with you. I did. On other bikes like R80 G/S models you need two and they are not the same model as here.

2. The correct part number is FEGV S3802






3. The gold valve goes in the right fork leg. The one that has the brake caliper mounted on it.

4. You need to decide what fork weight oil you want. I decided on 10 wt based on input from others here who have gone before me.

5. You need to decide how much fork oil you want to use. I decided to use the OEM amount in each fork leg for now. This is 400-420 cc in the left leg and 430-450 cc in the right leg. This is what I am using now.

6. You need to decide how you want to set your gold valve. I decided on 1.25 turns in. This was a recommendations from several folks. If you want to do just street riding then 2.0 turns is a good starting point. I will experiment.

7. You need just a few basic tools like a drill and some bits to do the job. No way to do it without them.

8. This is not rocket science. I am only going to show how to do it, not how it works. That is too hard for me.


Let's get started.


Here's what you get from Race Tech. Well, you don't get that damping rod, that's mine. And you can see from looking inside the front of the box that there is only one valve in there. Monza Blue has the other one in this set (Thanks Monza for doing all the work).




I will walk you through this step by step. It is really simple. Really. First, you need to add two more 5/16" holes to the bottom of the damping rod. Your damping rod is that metal pipe that you see sitting on top of the Race Tech box in the picture above.

The damping rod comes with one hole in it already. It looks like this:




Follow the instructions that come in the box. They look like this:




We're going to start with step 3 on these instructions below. However, we're only going to add 2 more holes. Not 6.




Lay your damping rod down. Using a sharpie or magic marker, do what I did in the picture. I drew a line even with the existing hole but rotated by 90 degrees. I then measured 7/16 of an inch to the left and to the right and made a mark. This is where the center of the two new holes will be.




Before you start drilling, use a punch to prick the holes. I used a spring loaded center punch as I just happened to have one.



Find a drill and some drill bits. A variable speed motor is nice.






Then drill pilot holes to start and then continue with bigger drill bits until you have both holes at 5/16" in diameter. You can't see her but my wife is using both hands to hold on to the damping rod while. I drill. I don't have a vise (need to get one).












Okay, that's all you have to do with the damping rod. I used a rat tail file and some emory paper to clean up the edges of the new hole. Then cleaned it up to ensure no metal bits were left in there.

Now, since you are adding a gold valve (and the spacer) to your fork, you need to shorten the plastic spacer. If you didn't you would have issues as the additional of Gold Valve assembly is adding > 1" of length. My PVC spacer was about 6 5/8" long. It looked like this. I had to use a tape measure as my caliper can only measure up to 6".






We need to shorten the spacer by the length of the gold valve and metal spacer. Here I am measuring it. It is just a tad over 1".




That means we have to shorten the PVC spacer the same amount, or about 1". I used a tubing cutter but you can use a hacksaw if you don't have one. It's not an issue if you don't cut the exact length. Just get real close.






I cut off 1 inch.




Now my PVC spacer is 1" shorter or about 5 5/8" inches.






All we have left to do now is to set how we want our gold valve to perform. Your basic gold valve look like this:






What you want to do, if you care to, is to set the tension on the spring by adjusting the screw. The amount of tension on the spring makes your Gold Valve perform differently by opening and closing at different rates.

To adjust your valve you need to loosen the lock nut here. This is an 8mm nut. You will need to hold the other end of the screw with a (I think) 3.5mm allen wrench.




Now, look at this end. What you have is a threaded screw and a spring. What you want to do is loosen the screw until there is no tension on the spring. Then turn it back in just a tiny little bit so the end of the screw is in contact with the screw. This is what I call the "Zero" setting. I decided I wanted 1.25 turns of screw. So, I simply turned the screw in 1.25 turns and then locked the lock nut that I undid before.




Make sure to hold the threaded screw in place when you tighten the lock nut.




That's it. You are now done prepping the gold valve install and are ready to put the forks back together including the gold valve in the right leg.

Tom

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Old 04-24-2009, 09:24 PM   #540
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Final Assembly

At this point I was ready to put everything back together. I had replaced all of the new parts in the fork slider, in the fork leg, and had done all the Gold Valve work for the right fork leg.

The instructions below will be almost the same for the left and the right leg except the right leg has the gold valve in it.

Left Leg Fork Tube Assembly

1. Take the damping rod and slide it into the fork leg. The part without the white bushing goes in first. Slide it in and ensure it goes all the way down. The end in first needs to come out the end of the fork leg.




2. Now slide the fork spring into the fork tube. The tapered end goes in first. See the picture.




3. Now slide the plastic PVC spacer in there.




4. Now you're ready to put the fork cap on. After you've pushed the damping rod, fork spring, and spacer in there the spacer should try to stick out 2-4" at the end. You need to get the fork cap in your hand, push down on the spacer, and twist it carefully to get the threads started. The spacer should stick out like this.




If the spacer is sticking out a whole lot more and it doesn't seem at all like this is going to work it is because your damping rod is not all the way down the fork leg. The end of the rod should be sticking out 1' or more from the other end.




Put the cap on and screw it in. Then use a socket and tighten it up.







Right Leg Fork Tube Assembly

This leg has the Gold Valve so it's a little different.

1. 1. Take the damping rod and slide it into the fork leg. The part without the white bushing goes in first. Slide it in and ensure it goes all the way down. The end in first needs to come out the end of the fork leg.




2. Now here is where you need to be really careful. In this step you will put the gold valve and it's spacer into the fork tube. It goes in like the picture shows. The spacer goes first, then the valve. I recommend you play around with the valve and spacer so you can feel which end of the spacer goes out. It's obviously as the valve only sits right with it one way. Then push these items into the fork tube carefully. Yes, the pointy end of the gold valve goes in last.




This is what you will see when you look into the end of the tube now:




3. Now you put the fork spring in there. On my bike the right fork spring has a metal spacer at the end. That end goes in first.




4. Now the PVC spacer you cut down previously goes in. Just like you did on the left side.

5. Then put the end cap on. Just like the other side.


Putting The Tube and The Slider Together.

At this point both of your fork tubes are complete and closed up. All we need to do now is to mate the fork tubes with the fork sliders. Both sides go together exactly the same. Just make sure that the right fork tube, with the extra holes in the end of the damping rod, goes into the fork slider that goes on the right. It's easy to tell as the right fork slider has the mounting tabs for the brake caliper.

1. Get some fork oil and rub it on the bushing on the end of the fork tube. Also rub some onto the metal bushing inside the fork slider. You want things to slide together easily and not to score the bushings.





2. Slide the fork tube into the bushing carefully. The damping rod end goes in first of course. You may need to press on the two pieces as the fork tube has to go past the fork seal and the new bushing. Just press hard.






3. Now we will fasten the end of the damping rod to the bottom of the fork slider. I guess I should have mentioned earlier that the cleaner and drier the end of the damping rod is the better. Look at the bottom end of the fork slider and see if the end of the damping rod is in the center of the hole. If not, use something like a screwdriver to carefully center it.

Then, put a few drops of blue loctite on the bolt, ensure the washer is on there, and screw it in carefully from the bottom of the slider into the damping rod.










Then torque it down using a torque wrench. I think it's 25 foot pounds / 35 nm, but don't use me as a reference. Check for yourself.




The two halves of your fork parts are now fastened together. Do the same operation for the other side. There is no difference at this point.

Now that both forks are together we have to add the dust shields to both. Slide the new (or used) dust shield down from the top of the fork tube into place. Then tap around the edge with a rubber mallet carefully.








Next put on the rubber for gaiters on both sides with their clamps. They only fit on one way: The big opening goes down.






Fork Oil - That's all that is left.


I decided on using the stock OEM settings for fork oil. And I selected this 10W fork oil.






I measured out the correct amount for the left and the right into a measuring cup that does not go back to the kitchen.




Right leg got 450 cc.




Left leg got 420 cc




I added it by removing the filler cap on each leg and just carefully pouring it in there. I used a wrench and t-handled allen wrench to remove the small filler opening in each for tube top. I was NOT removing the larger cap.

No pictures of the pouring as my assistant was not available and I only have 2 hands.




And that's it. Forks done and ready for install.




I have no idea if I made any mistakes or screwed anything up. But I have replaced all wearable parts in the forks (2x bushings, fork seal, dust seal, o-rings) and installed the Gold Valve. Also put fresh fork oil in there. The rubber gaiters on my bike looked almost new so did not change them.

Won't know for a while if they work well and don't leak.

Tom

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