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Old 07-17-2014, 11:09 AM   #1
73Mustang OP
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Ocean Water Corrosiveness

Hi. I figure vintage guys must be expert on rust. I come here to see the opinion of cleaning off ocean water.

Like after a day riding along the coastal beaches. Many waves slammed into your bike. Had no choice but to ride over the water for traction.

How would you get the coroosive stuff residual off?

73Mustang screwed with this post 07-17-2014 at 11:14 AM
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Old 07-17-2014, 01:40 PM   #2
Meriden
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I don't ride in salt water, but I've sailed in it in some old boats. My thoughts on a sea soaked bike are these:

Don't let the salt water dry before washing it completely in cold fresh water.

Take off as many parts as possible and wash them individually before replacing them.

Fasteners will be a major problem if salt water has penetrated them. This will be especially true with dissimilar metals (steel and aluminum) where galvanic corrosion will occur.

Check any electrical connectors that may have gotten wet and clean them as well.

Keep an eye on any chip in the paint. That is where rust will form.

If the part was covered with grease it will likely be okay.

Stay on top of cleaning the bike from here on out and there may be no problems.

Don't let the appearance of everything being fine create a false sense of security.
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Old 07-17-2014, 04:48 PM   #3
Andyinhilo
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I have been living around the ocean since I was 13. I am also a certified marine engine technician, and I had a Suzuki dealership in the Florida keys years ago.

I hate to sound negative, but unless a machine is engineered to be used in/around saltwater (think modern outboard motor), if you get it as wet as you describe, you are pretty much out of luck. Saltwater and spray has amazing penetrating capabilities, and unless you can dis-assemble and clean the parts, at some point down the road rust will be popping up all over, fasteners will seize, and aluminum parts will corrode. You are likely to have electrical issues as well.

I wish you luck.
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Old 07-18-2014, 07:53 AM   #4
H96669
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Nasty stuff....this should work for you.
http://www.saltawayproducts.com/


Darn forgot to bring some to work and the bike is now parked right next to the salt chuck for a month as I am floating in the stuff. It should be fine but for the fresh road salt on our gravel road the morning I left that I couldn't clean before going back to sea.
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Old 07-18-2014, 11:35 PM   #5
Airhead Wrangler
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This is what we use on steel in marine construction to prep for protective coatings.

https://www.chlor-rid.com/home.php
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Old 07-19-2014, 06:07 PM   #6
Middleweightboxer
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After a visit to the salt flats everything gets carefully washed and then soaked with CorrosionX.
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Old 07-20-2014, 02:18 PM   #7
concours
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andyinhilo View Post
I have been living around the ocean since I was 13. I am also a certified marine engine technician, and I had a Suzuki dealership in the Florida keys years ago.

I hate to sound negative, but unless a machine is engineered to be used in/around saltwater (think modern outboard motor), if you get it as wet as you describe, you are pretty much out of luck. Saltwater and spray has amazing penetrating capabilities, and unless you can dis-assemble and clean the parts, at some point down the road rust will be popping up all over, fasteners will seize, and aluminum parts will corrode. You are likely to have electrical issues as well.

I wish you luck.
This.

Grew up along the atlantic. Battling road salt damage to cars for decades too.
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Old 07-21-2014, 10:54 AM   #8
mwood7800
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Toss the bike, it's done, will be fine for a couple months, then downhill fast.
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