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Old 02-12-2009, 11:29 PM   #1
macuser OP
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KTM 640 Enduro to Adventure conversion

2003 KTM LC4 640 Enduro converted to KTM 640 Adventure (by Macuser) **see pages 2-4 for pictures**

Q Why convert an LC4 640 Enduro rather than selling it and getting a 640 Adventure model?
My Enduro had low mileage, I was confident in it’s reliability, and most importantly I knew I would get a good deal on parts because I had a good relationship (platonic) with a bike dealer and had asked him about a deal on parts previous to making my decision.

I had been waiting two years for KTM to come out with a 690 Adventure but I was tired of waiting and I wanted a somewhat light and extremely off-road worthy Adventurer. Despite the 640’s vibration issues I decided that it was the best bike for me. I had been looking for an Adventure model for about a year before I did this conversion but hadn’t come up with anything that had encouraged me to sell my bike and buy an Adventure model. As is customary with this sort of thing, several 640 Adventure models at a reasonable price became available shortly after I had ordered the parts and had committed myself to the project. I will say now that by having at least done the conversion myself I have a higher level of confidence in trouble shooting some future electrical, fuel and various other problems because I have a more ‘intimate’ relationship with my bike. My girlfriend continues to talk as if I’m having an affair with Katie M (K-T-M).

Q It’s a go so now what?
First step is to figure out what parts you need and how much they are going to cost. I used a website that had microfiche ordering sheets with accompanying pictures. I printed these out and highlighted all the parts I would need. Believe me there are a lot of parts you need to make this conversion – most of them small however and not that costly. Overall cost without suspension work was close to $3000 Canadian – not an insignificant sum! The suspension work alone was just over a $1000. Consider that I got a deal on parts and you might want to reconsider doing this yourself. I had tracked down someone who was parting out an Adventure model and could have obtained most of the necessary parts used and at a reduced cost, but with all the hassle involved and the deal I was getting on new parts I opted for the later. I faxed the order forms with the highlighted sections to the dealer and went over the items with the parts person. Expect to have a few pieces backordered and to have forgotten or missed a few parts. I started this project at the end of the riding season so I wouldn’t be under time pressures. My lackadaisical attitude and the fact that this was my #2 dual-sport, found me in a time predicament in the end however.

Despite converting a 2003, I chose to use the 2006 Adventure parts as it has a slightly different tank and tank kit which would allow me to use my old locking fuel cap as well as buy a more complete tank kit. All the 2006 parts fit nicely with the 2003.

Q Parts are ordered but what can I do in the mean time?
Strip baby strip! Old seat off, tank, rad wings, bars, controls, headset and triple clamps, headlight, front wheel, forks… At least you don’t have to pull the engine ☺


Q What has to be done with the suspension?
My shock and forks were due for an overhaul and the added weight of the adventure parts, tank and fuel warranted heavier springs front and back. I also wanted my suspension to allow me to attack the whoops in the California desert so a revalve was in order. I ended up getting new stiffer springs and a total revalve and service. I was under time constraints and I’m no expert on suspension so I went with a local, reputable suspension guru who works with off-road racing pros and also had experience with the 640s.

Q What about a bracket to mount the mask (fairing) and Adventure headlights to the frame?
The part of this project that proved to take the most time (other than waiting for parts and getting off my tush) was finding a picture and measurements for the bracket that would have to be welded onto the frame head tube. Thanks go out to LukasM and a couple of other adventurers for helping me out in this respect. Even considering the dimensions I was given, I had to spend a fair bit of time doing some estimating of how exactly I would design my bracket. I drew up some scale blueprints and printed out the pictures that LukasM had so kindly sent me and set off for some machine shops. Several shops and a week later and I had an estimate I could live with - $120 for a complete bracket.

Q Bracket in hand, now what?
I had to wait for the mask (fairing) frame to be certain the new bracket was going to fit as intended. When I received the mask frame I matched it up to the custom head tube bracket and it fit beautifully. With the bracket fitting I now had to figure out where exactly to weld it to my frame. I first mounted the tank and fairing brackets that fit in front of the radiators, then fit the mask/fairing frame. This gave me the location that I’d have to weld the main head tube bracket. A dealer helped me locate a custom fabrication shop that had a lot of experience with welding on motorcycles and I took my stripped Enduro there to weld up the bracket. (I pulled the bearings but not races due to heat damage and potential warpage.) I had some concerns about frying my CDI or other electrical system parts but was assured by the welding shop that disconnecting the battery was sufficient because there would be little stray electricity because the welding ground would be so close to the part being welded and it was far away from electrical parts. (I did not end up having any problems with the electrical system after this but it’s always a possibility.) $75 later I had a bracket welded on the head tube and was off to get started building this thing.

Q What challenges lay ahead?
Note: At this point in my conversion I was due to leave on an adventure trip with my fellow adventurer ‘Worone’ in less than 12 hours and had a garage full of parts and no idea how this went together. What had happened to the whole winter I had given myself to complete this project? Don’t ask. I was now in a pressure cooker of my own creation. I felt like I was back in University with two research papers due the next morning. Oh well, I had completed those on time so I would survive this to – or would I…

In the back of my head I was apprehensive about the electrical ‘nightmare’ I thought I’d have to encounter when I got to that stage but my plan was to take it one step at a time and be confident in my skills and potentially my network of friend’s skills. Two things ended up taxing my brain especially hard and they didn’t have to do with electrical systems. Having never looked at an Adventure model in person I didn’t know where to mount the fuel pump. I searched the Internet far and wide for a picture that would show where the fuel pump was located but couldn’t find a picture for the life of me. With bracket in hand I just kept matching up the holes with frame bolts and continued to spin the bracket and look for a match. Finally I found a spot that fit the bracket and would also allow the fuel pump room to fit. Wow if only I had had an actual Adventure model to look at it would have saved me two hours or more of my time.

Next problem…er ‘challenge’, was how to hook up the fuel pump. An Internet search told me that I needed to hook it up to a vacuum source but where was I to find that? I looked at the carburetor but couldn’t come up with a suitable candidate. A quick phone call to Larry (the owner of Excalibur Motorcycles in Thunder Bay, Ontario) had him searching for my answer. He called me later with the answer for which I was truly appreciative of. On the right side of the cylinder there is a hole for a vacuum line fitting. It’s not needed on the Enduro model so it had an allen head bolt stuck in it. I removed it and went - bolt in hand - in search of a vacuum fitting or hollow bolt that I could fit a line to. Several hours and no luck later I was dumbfounded…or just dumb. My search of motorcycle scrap yards and various specialty shops had come up short. What was I going to do now? Time was running out! What would you have done? I ended up just getting a long bolt that fit the vacuum hole and carefully drilling it out. It worked nicely. I would have ordered the bolt but I didn’t have time as I was leaving on a bike trip today come hell or high water! Unfortunately, or fortunately depending on how you look at it – the shock spring was a day late in arriving and I got an extra 18 hours or so to work on my bike. Sorry Worone.

Q Electrical nightmare?
The electrical system on a 640 Adventure is a little more complicated than on an LC4 640 Enduro but not insurmountably so. In fact the conversion turned out to be fairly straightforward and I believe – possible for an electrical neophyte if you have a schematic diagram of both bikes – which I did. The lighting and instrumentation wiring on the 640 Enduro model is quite a bit shorter than on the Adventure model because it doesn’t have to go out so far to reach the headlight, signals and instrumentation. I decided to keep things simple (and cheaper) and make the Enduro wiring work. I printed out a schematic of the 640 Adventure from a manual I had purchased and downloaded from the Internet, and compared it to the LC4 schematic. Hmm I thought, all the necessary sources of power seemed to be on the LC4 wiring harness and it shouldn’t be hard to get them to match up. Boldly going where no man has gone before I clipped the plugs off of several wires that went to the headlight of the LC4. I was committed now and there was no turning back. It gave me confidence that I’d actually finish this job as soon as I cut those wires. It was now just a matter of staying focused. A trip around town looking for some exact electrical plugs to match the factory plugs came up short and as I was in a time crunch I had to make due. I soldered what I could to make things less likely to cause me problems in the future and labeled some of the connections. All electrical connections were hooked up as per the Adventure schematic and then zip tied to allow the forks to be turned from stop to stop without getting caught up. The turn signal wires are the only connections that can’t be hooked up until the mask or fairing is mounted. Be sure to use easy connect/disconnect connectors for the signals because each time the fairing has to come off these also have to come off.

Q What about the instrumentation panel, etc?
As I was under a tight timeline I simply used the old instrumentation panel and fastened a quick mount for it. I used a hack saw and dremel to cut some superfluous parts off the old panel to make it look a little better – little being the key word. It is not pretty and definitely has to be fixed up in the future but it worked fine for the trip. My other concern was the brake line getting caught up on the fairing or other lighting stuff. I used a number of zip ties to control the area where the cable could run. There is a stiff metal brake cable guide wire that bolts to the underside of the top triple clamp on the Adventure model, but unfortunately I hadn’t ordered it and frankly didn’t’ have the time to order it and wait for it to arrive. I also missed ordering some bushings for the headlight mounts but fabricated some from fitting two rubber hoses together (one inside the other) and cutting off sections of it so as to form rubber washers/bushings. Other than a few hiccups the conversion went well. Having left things way longer than I should have caused me to go with little sleep on the last night due to frantically fabricating parts but overall it was a success. The new fuel pump even makes my bike start easier with the kick-starter than it had previously as an LC4 model.

See the accompanying pictures that follow on pages 2-4. I will also include a copy of the blueprint for the bracket that has to be fabricated as soon as I get it from the back seat of my car. As it’s currently -28 degrees Celsius here this might take me a while sorry.
December 13, 2009






Original post: Does anyone know where i can find information on obtaining or making a HEADSET BRACKET to mount the KTM 640 Adventure kit on my 640 LC4 Enduro?

I have the tank and the other parts are on the way but i'm not sure where i can buy a bracket to mount on my bike. Thanks
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2003 KTM 640 Adventure I made from an enduro model
2000 KTM 50 Pro Senior air-cooled
1998 KX 100; had(2007 KTM 450EXC, 2003 KTM 450SX 6sp, electric start, 18";1999 WR400 Baja Designs)

macuser screwed with this post 12-13-2009 at 10:10 PM
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Old 02-13-2009, 12:20 AM   #2
meat popsicle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macuser
Does anyone know where i can find information on obtaining or making a HEADSET BRACKET to mount the KTM 640 Adventure kit on my 640 LC4 Enduro?

I have the tank and the other parts are on the way but i'm not sure where i can buy a bracket to mount on my bike. Thanks
Hiya,

I have not heard of an aftermarket bracket, which I take you to mean the front subframe that holds the dash and fairing of the Adventure model. Maybe one of the Custom Rallye part mfgs... $$$$$$!

KTM stuff ain't cheap, but you can buy the stuff without a second mortgage. Links from the index (SXC conversion discussions) and a quick forum search for Steelhead's posts:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=167067
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=134499
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=198645
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...t=72586&page=2
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Old 02-13-2009, 12:46 AM   #3
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You already have the front subframe, right? AKA headlight carrier, #1





The bracket on the front of the frame that holds the front subframe is welded on as part of the frame, on the front of the head tube.
You'd probably have to custom fab one, and weld it up. Don't screw up the VIN when you weld it on. It's right there on the right side.
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Old 02-13-2009, 12:59 AM   #4
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Except for addin' "adventure" style, extra weight, and vulnerable plastic bits that get scratched when you go for adventure, why bother changing your E? An 18L tank, MRA Roadshield, and some luggage and you have all the functions of an Adventure and enough $$ left over to ride somewhere interesting for a month or two.
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Old 02-13-2009, 04:56 AM   #5
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You will have to get the bracket made or cut it out of metal yourself and then weld it to the frame. It is not available separately from KTM.

Thanks to the help of Bruce aka Gaspipe I have the measurements. I'll post them later when I get a chance.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk
Except for addin' "adventure" style, extra weight, and vulnerable plastic bits that get scratched when you go for adventure, why bother changing your E? An 18L tank, MRA Roadshield, and some luggage and you have all the functions of an Adventure and enough $$ left over to ride somewhere interesting for a month or two.
How about having room to mount roadbook and navigation gear, better lights and HID ballasts, switches, indicators, auxiliary fusebox, big horn, etc.?
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Old 02-13-2009, 08:22 AM   #6
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I'd just buy an adventure model, prolly cheaper in the long run.
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Old 02-13-2009, 04:24 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GodSilla
I'd just buy an adventure model, prolly cheaper in the long run.
This is indeed the CW when starting from scratch but if you re-read his initial post he already has the tank and other parts were "on the way". Maybe you could sell them all but if you've already bought them, you may as well keep going.
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Old 02-13-2009, 09:37 PM   #8
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I could trace mine and email it but im sure just with the measurements Lucas says he will post you will be fine. Once you get the plates and pipe for the bolts welded together all you need to do is with the tank brace radiator frame mounted you can bolt up the headlight holder and swing it up in to the head tube to find where it lines up. Ps I think from your previous post you will need a 28ltr tank the 18 from the lc4 wont fit right.

Godsilla, I converted an sxc including a frame for under 1,000 ...gently used parts and somehow it feels more like my own bike since I did the rebuilding.
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Old 02-15-2009, 04:05 PM   #9
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OK, here are the measurements from Gaspipe:

Quote:
Originally Posted by gaspipe
Lukas

Here you go:

A: 54mm
C: 28.5mm
D: 8.25mm (for an 8mm bolt)

The flange is made of 3.5mm thick steel, so you don't need dimension B.

Hope that helps!!!

Bruce

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Old 04-16-2009, 12:33 AM   #10
macuser OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM
OK, here are the measurements from Gaspipe:




Thank you soooo much for the great info!!! Time for me to get one made up and get this project started!
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Old 04-16-2009, 03:09 AM   #11
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dont forget the bracket has dowels between the plates for added strength...
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Old 04-20-2009, 10:34 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrk2surf
dont forget the bracket has dowels between the plates for added strength...
thanks 4 that I might have missed it :)
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Old 04-21-2009, 09:35 AM   #13
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Like this:



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Old 04-21-2009, 07:08 PM   #14
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Thanks!! That'll help
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1998 KX 100; had(2007 KTM 450EXC, 2003 KTM 450SX 6sp, electric start, 18";1999 WR400 Baja Designs)
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Old 04-26-2009, 01:42 PM   #15
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Here's the before picture of my 2003 LC4 640 enduro.

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1998 KX 100; had(2007 KTM 450EXC, 2003 KTM 450SX 6sp, electric start, 18";1999 WR400 Baja Designs)
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