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Old 03-01-2009, 12:34 PM   #31
Pedro Navaja
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Bob,

Did you guys do any air pressure regulating on your tires due to altitude. I find I gain 3-5 lbs of air pressure (cold measurement) when I am in places like Saltillo. Are you bleeding your tires when you get to any certain elevation?

Mike
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Old 03-01-2009, 02:29 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedro Navaja

Did you guys do any air pressure regulating on your tires due to altitude. I find I gain 3-5 lbs of air pressure (cold measurement) when I am in places like Saltillo. Are you bleeding your tires when you get to any certain elevation?

Mike
I had to sit back and think about this one. And honestly, I'll throw it open to the gallery for opinions. I am a bad boy, and I should check air pressure in the tires no matter what more often than I do. Technos in the bar might opine what importance even 2-3 lbs of pressure make, a fact to which I could not argue either way. Heck, I'm just now getting real good at making sure the oil level is somewhere in the sight glass every morning. And I bought one of those overpriced-but-oh-so-sexy BMW pressure guages.

I let the air out of bicycle tires when shipping by airplane. In that case, the pressure in a bicycle tire is (for me) usually 120 psi. And you are rising 30K+ into the stratosphere. Motorcycle tire? 38-42 psi, and rising only up to, let's say, 6,500 - 7,500 feet (typical in Mexico). I would not guess that you would find a pressure deviation inside the tire, but you have me thinking. I would really like to hear opinons on this.

I am not as bad at checking as I might have made myself appear, and I do get all about tire pressure reduction off-road. That topic alone is worth bets and beers. I have a Cycle-Pump, with guage, so de-pressuring and re-inflating are no problem on the road (except for the flat tire due to road bits at Palenque, but I am getting ahead of myself). Point is, I have the gear and I have no excuse when it comes to having the tires set correctly. And since I love talking techno stuff like this, but bow to those with more experience or better suggestions, I am all

Good question Mike - and now open to other's opinions now or later
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Old 03-01-2009, 03:14 PM   #33
Pedro Navaja
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
...
Good question Mike - and now open to other's opinions now or later
I didn't mean to to stimulate such a response. However, I only asked because it sounded like you were doing some serious twisty carving in the mountains. Could make a difference there, but for normal riding I would not inflate/deflate or get to hyped over +/- 5 psi. Nevertheless, I would think for serious carving I would rather have the air pressure on the low side.

Mike
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Old 03-01-2009, 04:43 PM   #34
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[quote=Pedro Navaja]I didn't mean to to stimulate such a response. However, I only asked because it sounded like you were doing some serious twisty carving in the mountains...


I have never worried about set the tire's pressure depending on the riding altitude. I have riden my CBR 600 (38 psi) straigth from Reynosa 210 feet elevation, to Guadalajara (passing over the 7200 feet elevation at Zacatecas), same with the KLR 650 (32 psi) and no problem at all.


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Old 03-01-2009, 05:40 PM   #35
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Insanely jealous

Seriously, Motorcycles, Mexico and diving?! OK, I'm happy for ya, just I could've gone.
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Old 03-01-2009, 05:51 PM   #36
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The Town With the Silver Lining, I mean, Mining

Pachuca is a very lightly touristed town, just about 50 miles northeast of Mexico City. It sits in somewhat of a bowel, with houses brightly painted and dotting the hillside somewhat like San Miguel and Guanajuato, and like Guanajuato, Pachuca owes much of its history to mining. Two years ago, I was in such a mine in nearby Real de Monte, experiencing what getting smacked in the noggin is like even though you think you’re protected by a mining helmet. Pachuca is the capital of the state of Hildalgo, and we would probably not have stopped there, save for the fact that we had been shooting for Puebla, but since we made the stop at Xilitla, we didn’t have the desire or the need to push to Puebla, so we selected Pachuca as the overnight stop. Being Saturday night, it meant that we would pull into Puebla on Sunday, the big market day, and see all of the activity centered on that. Better than getting to Puebla on a Saturday, and missing the festivities. Serendipity at work again. Love it.

The zócolo is dominated by the Reloj Monumental, the Clock Tower, built in the early 1900s to celebrate the centennial of the independence. I shot it in the evening at daybreak, when nobody was around. I’m not sure why Pachuca doesn’t see more tourists, as it is plotted in the direction away from Mexico City in the direction of the Sierra Madre Oriental, the mountains we had just traversed. Perhaps it is too close to Mexico City, easily by-passed by nationals on their way to the coast or to the Huasteca region.

The hotel we stayed at was another Lonely Planet find. We followed the highway into town, easily, using the “Centro” signs. Wasn’t hard at all to find the Hotel Emily. Right on the zócolo. Parking for the motorcycles was right beneath the hotel, although we parked on the street initially, and walked to the front desk which borders the zócolo on the south side, the only side without a street for cars, just a pedestrian walkway. Access to/from the garage seems to be via a short, private drive reserved only for the hotel. If you visit Pachuca and stay at the Emily, I hope you meet Mayte (Mah -E-Tay) at the front desk. Charmer. She speaks virtually self-taught, almost perfect English, and she was most helpful. Rooms were mid-priced, but the amenities of the hotel were welcome after beating ourselves up in the mountains. It was another long day for Subcomandante, but after this day, there would only be a short day to Puebla and another short day to Veracruz, with lots of chances to stop and see things.

























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Our Pachuca Taxista

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Old 03-01-2009, 05:55 PM   #37
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Great RR Trice!!

Consider that one atmosphere is 14.7 PSI. So to take a tire from 32 PSIG (G equals Gauge the engineers tell me) to 49.7 PSIG you would have to go to space. 0 up to 10,000 feet is 2 miles. Depending on who you decide is right, space is between 50 and 62 miles up. So at most you are 1/25 of the distance to space. 1013 Millibars of pressure is the average pressure at sea level. 697 millibars at 10000 feet. 697 / 1013 = .68 So at 10,000 feet you have only .68 atmospheres of pressure, or 10.1 PSI. If you stick that same 32 PSI tire on a gauge it would read approximately 14.7 - 10.1 = 3.6 + 32 = 35.6 PSIG.

On a little YSR race bike I can maybe tell the difference between 19 and 22 PSIG on a hot sticky summer race track if playing with pressures. But on a street bike or dirt bike I would be clueless how 32 vesus 35.6 PSIG would feel!! I usually just pump em up till it looks and feels good.
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Old 03-01-2009, 06:27 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadman

Consider that one atmosphere is 14.7 PSI. So to take a tire from 32 PSIG (G equals Gauge the engineers tell me) to 49.7 PSIG you would have to go to space. 0 up to 10,000 feet is 2 miles. Depending on who you decide is right, space is between 50 and 62 miles up. So at most you are 1/25 of the distance to space. 1013 Millibars of pressure is the average pressure at sea level. 697 millibars at 10000 feet. 697 / 1013 = .68 So at 10,000 feet you have only .68 atmospheres of pressure, or 10.1 PSI. If you stick that same 32 PSI tire on a gauge it would read approximately 14.7 - 10.1 = 3.6 + 32 = 35.6 PSIG...........
My head hurts, but I just KNOW you know what you're talking about!
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Old 03-01-2009, 06:33 PM   #39
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The Taxi Trick



I’m about to tell you about one of the most powerful tools for touring Mexico that there is. I didn’t invent it, I didn’t perfect it, but I use it all the time. It involves the use of following taxis to find your way into and out of congested cities and/or cities with complicated highway patterns.

Save yourself the headache or worry about getting lost. Hire a taxi, your private tour guide. Never paid more than 70 pesos this whole trip, and that was a lot. Usually paid an average of 30 pesos. Be a part of the economic stimulus, and start to depend on taxis to get where you are going and save time.

It is easier to find your way into the city than out of it, especially if all you are trying to do is find the zócolo. All centers of town have hotels, and they are usually in the Lonely Planet. If they are not on the zócolo, they’re usually one or two blocks off of it. Here in Pachuca, we left the highway and followed signs to the Centro, where the Hotel Emily was located. 9 times out of 10 in any typical Mexico town, you’ll find accommodations on or near the Centro. If your hotel is from the Lonely Planet and isn’t on the zócolo, then use a taxi to find it. It is easier than asking for directions. The taxistas almost expect you.
When you are coming into town, its easy to find the Centro.

Not so fast finding your way leaving town. You can leave by almost any compass direction. Fumble with maps? No thanks. Most maps don’t map the grid you face and only mark the major autopistas and rutas to your next destination. Let the taxi guy do the navigating.

Taxis are always, always, all over the place. Just come to the outskirts of town and get some gas, and you’ll find a half dozen at the pump within 15 minutes. Leaving town, ask the hotel desk to call a cab, or just walk to the street and flag one down. Explain to the driver what you want. When that’s understood, settle on a price. I always pay the driver in advance, so he doesn’t have to stop to collect.

I explain that we will follow behind, so please be careful when crossing traffic lights, please don’t lose us in traffic. I ask them to watch their mirrors, and let them know that we’ll be in a pack right behind. It has always worked, always worked like a charm, and never once have we failed to find our hotel on the way in, or find our autopista/quota on the way out. What’s more, these guys KNOW their cities. You get the top secret, super fast, short cuts in and out. They like bikes too, and it gives them something different to do.

Sometimes the experience is funny. Like entering Coatzacoalcos. We were looking for the hotel Terra Nova, and flagged down a taxi at the Pemex. “Excuse me, do you know where the Hotel Terra Nova is located”…..”Yes, of course”….”Can you take us there?”….”Sure, 30 pesos”….”30 pesos?, let’s go!” With that, we did a quick u-turn with the taxi, went about a ¼ mile, and pulled into the drive for the hotel. Other times, like leaving Puebla or entering San Cristobal, we did so many left and right turns I couldn’t recreate it if my life depended on it. We got in, we got out, super fast. Cheap. Love it.

Forget Bicimapas. Sometimes the autorouting feature worked, but most times not. I like the personal touch, the local knowledge the taxista can provide. Plus, I like helping the local economy. I also like the stress-free feeling and the knowledge that we’re probably saving a ton of daylight by not running rabbit trails. I didn’t need a taxi in San Miguel, I can almost find the Posada de las Monjas by feel alone. But the new, big cities, forget it. Taxi! Over here!

Don’t speak Spanish? You can still use the taxi trick. Find someone to write out the basic request in Spanish for you, just leave a blank for the destination. Make up a couple of these cards, and carry them with you. Even if you don’t plan up front to use a taxi as I’ve described, make up the card anyway. When you get lost and are at your wits’ end, pull out the card to get you home.

Taxis are even useful when you’re buttoned in your hotel, and wondering what to do. Do you like to take a lot of photographs and you have a day to kill somewhere? Hire a taxi by the hour! Explain to the taxi driver that you’d like to see the major sites. He can drive you around and wait while you jump in and out to take your photos. That’s what I did in Puerto Vallarta. Saves lots of time and walking around from one end of town to the other. You don’t want to continually flag down taxis from one destination to the next. Just make sure you agree on the fee ahead of time. And be sure the taxi has air conditioning.

To use a taxi in this way, since you’ll be inside it and not behind it, just use common sense and consider asking the desk to call the cab for you, as a measure of insurance that you are getting a reputable company.


tricepilot screwed with this post 03-01-2009 at 07:42 PM
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Old 03-01-2009, 06:43 PM   #40
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Another fantastic Trice Pilot adventure!! I'm subscribed!

Las Pozas is high on my list of places to visit.
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Old 03-01-2009, 06:49 PM   #41
Pedro Navaja
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadman
...
On a little YSR race bike I can maybe tell the difference between 19 and 22 PSIG on a hot sticky summer race track if playing with pressures. But on a street bike or dirt bike I would be clueless how 32 vesus 35.6 PSIG would feel!! I usually just pump em up till it looks and feels good.
I'm not sure "feel" is the issue here. Contact patch area seems to be the main issue if we are to believe people like Lee Parks. Personally, I keep an eye on the pressure more for tread wear purposes. Anyways, it was just a questioned proposed to Bob. Not meant to get us off topic.

Bob, great pictures of Pachuca
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Old 03-01-2009, 07:32 PM   #42
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Thanks for the tips, nice touch.

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Old 03-01-2009, 09:31 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
...use of following taxis to find your way into and out of congested cities and/or cities with complicated highway patterns.
I once spent two hours getting out of Guatemala City, asked for directions about 10 times, finally a guy just said, follow me, I'll show you the way. I'd probably still be there wandering around if it weren't for him. Taxis...yes...good.
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Old 03-02-2009, 01:29 AM   #44
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Pulled into big Monterrey once, from the south. Needed the Harley dealership. Asked, asked, and asked, telephone books, car dealerships. Nada. Finally in despiration hit upon following a taxi. No problema. (In case you don't know, it was a small miracle finding the Harley dealership in Mty.) 'Course nowdays there are cell phones that work in Mexico, and internet. Still............

I head south to Mexico in two weeks .
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Old 03-02-2009, 04:09 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot
Pachuca is a very lightly touristed town, just about 50 miles northeast of Mexico City. It sits in somewhat of a bowel, with houses brightly painted and dotting the hillside somewhat like San Miguel and Guanajuato, and like Guanajuato, Pachuca owes much of its history to mining.
+ this





= funny as shit!
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