ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-21-2015, 09:43 AM   #1
roma258 OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Oddometer: 241
Dual-sport tires for playing in the twisties

Tried searching, but nothing really came up. So say you have a nicely motored DS, like KTM 690 or DRZ with a big bore kit. You ride it in the dirt, but also want to play in the twisties. Does it really matter what tires you're running, or are there DS tires (21 front, 18 rear) that have better grip on the street than others? Street guys will talk your ear off with why their preferred tire is better, how about the DS guys?
roma258 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 09:48 AM   #2
pretbek
Beastly Adventurer
 
pretbek's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Oddometer: 1,145
Quote:
Originally Posted by roma258 View Post
Tried searching, but nothing really came up. So say you have a nicely motored DS, like KTM 690 or DRZ with a big bore kit. You ride it in the dirt, but also want to play in the twisties. Does it really matter what tires you're running, or are there DS tires (21 front, 18 rear) that have better grip on the street than others? Street guys will talk your ear off with why their preferred tire is better, how about the DS guys?
I find that TKC-80s have a surprising amount of grip.

At first they feel a bit floaty on paved roads compared to street tires, but once you get used to them you can wail through turns at higher speed than you'd expect.
pretbek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 09:49 AM   #3
SloMo228
World Class Cheapass
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: SE Michigan
Oddometer: 1,825
Well, I don't have a high-powered DS, but I have flogged the hell out of my DR350 on tight and twisty roads in Tennessee, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Missouri while shod with Shinko 244s. They're billed as 50/50 tires but they are great on the street IME. Very predictable, not too squirmy,and more than enough grip for a lightweight DS bike on asphalt. I'm sure there are better tires out there but for the price I've not tried a better DS tire for pavement.
__________________
--------------------------- Steve----------------------------------------
'96 DR350SE
SloMo228 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 09:52 AM   #4
LittleRedToyota
Yinzer
 
LittleRedToyota's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Pittsburgh
Oddometer: 2,314
as far as DOT knobbies go (assuming you want to stick to those so you have at least half decent dirt performance), i've found dunlop 606s to handle pretty well in the twisties. they're far from the best dirt tires going (especially the front), but are OK. the rear holds up on pavement pretty well. the front cups quickly (and, since it is a directional tire, you can't flip it around when it starts to cup).

i imagine that if you are willing to give up knobbies, you can get better twisty handling, but then you lose dirt performance.

the only non-knobby DS tire i have run is the kenda 270. if the pavement is wet at all, though, it actually handles pavement worse than the 606s.

if you want better dirt performance than the 606, the pirelli XCMH is a good choice. the front is a really good tire. handles dirt like a real dirt tire. handles pavement not quite as well as a 606 front, but not terribly. lasts twice as long as a 606 front. the XCMH rear is a significantly better dirt tire than the 606 rear, handles pavement close to the same, lasts close to the same.
__________________
2009 KTM 450 xc-w (plated); 2009 DRZ400s
go soothingly on the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.
LittleRedToyota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 09:55 AM   #5
el queso
toda su base
 
el queso's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: colinas del norte, california sur
Oddometer: 745
Dunlop D606's always performed surprising well for me in the twisties. They were very predictable, and to me that's the most important trait.
el queso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 09:58 AM   #6
MeinMotorrad
Beastly Adventurer
 
MeinMotorrad's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: UK for now.
Oddometer: 1,520
It depends how much and what kind of off road you're doing I guess.

I use Pirelli MT21s (there was nothing else available) for dry off road (desert/gravel/stone/sand etc) and mine have also held up pretty well on road including high speed 1000+ mile ride fully loaded with luggage. Never ridden them in the wet or mud so can't comment. Grip wise on tarmac they're OK but you notice the difference with more road orientated tyres like the MT90 which is like riding on rails on road but limited off road.

My bike came with TKC80's - I didn't trust them on wet roads, rear kept trying to break away, I actually got wheel spin at 70mph when I opened the throttle to overtake once, really scary
__________________
'12 KTM 690 Enduro R
MeinMotorrad is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 10:07 AM   #7
kfsinc
Chaingolian Observer
 
kfsinc's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2003
Location: Crystal Lake, IL
Oddometer: 2,583
I've seen a few mixed tire set-ups that seem to make sense for this type of riding.

Road oriented in the front (Distanza?), and more dirt (TKC?) in the back.

The one guy I spoke to said it worked well. Plenty of grip up front on and off road, and lots of grip in the back.

I'm certainly no expert, and I'd do more research before taking this route, but certainly worth a look.

kfs
__________________
Karl
R1100GS
F650GS -- sold -- what's next?
“If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough.”, Mario Andretti


Indulge. Repent. Repeat.
kfsinc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 10:29 AM   #8
High Country Herb
Adventure Connoiseur
 
High Country Herb's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Western Sierras
Oddometer: 9,235
I currently have the TKC80's. They do fairly well in corners, but have very little stopping ability.

For my next set, I am going to try the Pirelli's they just redesigned for the Ducati Scrambler: MT-60RS.

For light dirt use, I used to run the Kenda K761 on my XL600. They were cheap, awesome on pavement, but bad on loose dirt.
__________________
2009 Aprilia Dorsoduro 750 (adventurized): http://www.apriliaforum.com/forums/a...893274&thumb=1
High Country Herb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 11:10 AM   #9
Auto-X Fil
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Location: Montrose, PA.
Oddometer: 687
Quote:
Originally Posted by SloMo228 View Post
Shinko 244s. They're billed as 50/50 tires but they are great on the street IME. Very predictable, not too squirmy,and more than enough grip for a lightweight DS bike on asphalt. I'm sure there are better tires out there but for the price I've not tried a better DS tire for pavement.
The 244 is predictable, but not grippy. The MT21 (or MT21 front, D606 rear combo) provides far more performance on- and off-road. But they aren't cheap.
Auto-X Fil is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 02:21 PM   #10
Jim Day
full manic mechanic
 
Jim Day's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: So. Cal.
Oddometer: 1,115
Quote:
Originally Posted by SloMo228 View Post
Well, I don't have a high-powered DS, but I have flogged the hell out of my DR350 on tight and twisty roads in Tennessee, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Missouri while shod with Shinko 244s. They're billed as 50/50 tires but they are great on the street IME. Very predictable, not too squirmy,and more than enough grip for a lightweight DS bike on asphalt. I'm sure there are better tires out there but for the price I've not tried a better DS tire for pavement.
Currently I have Shinkos on all three of my dual sport mods. As you say they are inexpensive and very predictable. I love them. Of the three my R100R mod with 705s runs the best in the twisties but I actually really enjoy running my R75/6 with 241s. They do drift a little on acceleration and you can't push them as hard as the 705s but I find it kind of fun in a old fashioned enduro kind of way.

Like I said I really love the 705 on pavement and if you're riding on gravel, dry lakes or hard packed dirt they are great but start trying to climb a hill with loose dirt or corner hard in slop or sand and they just do not cut it for me.

So hows the 244 in softer stuff?

My new build is more about riding hard and less about touring so I'm considering a D606 on the rear and a Michelin Desert Race on the front, but I've looked at the 244 as a cheap more all around alternative for day to day use. Just curious how it holds up in softer conditions, or for more aggressive off road and trail riding.

Jim Day screwed with this post 05-21-2015 at 05:44 PM
Jim Day is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 02:24 PM   #11
Jim Day
full manic mechanic
 
Jim Day's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: So. Cal.
Oddometer: 1,115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auto-X Fil View Post
The 244 is predictable, but not grippy. The MT21 (or MT21 front, D606 rear combo) provides far more performance on- and off-road. But they aren't cheap.

That's some good info. what kind of wear/miles are you getting out of the MT21?
Jim Day is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 02:30 PM   #12
klaviator
Beastly Adventurer
 
klaviator's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2008
Location: Huntsville, AL
Oddometer: 6,620
Pirelli MT-21's work great on pavement and pretty well off road as well. If you're on a budget then Shinko 244s work pretty well on and off as well.
The only dual sport tire that I have tried that was crap on the pavement was the Kenda 270. Everything else (Duro Median, Avon Gripster, Dunlop D606, Bridgstone Trail Wing, and a few others I can't remember) all worked pretty well on the pavment. Some weren't so good off road. I always rode my DS bikes likie sportbikes on the pavement. I ran out of ground clearance before traction on most of those tires.
__________________
I ride, Therefore I Am.



klaviator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 03:35 PM   #13
trailer Rails
Beastly Adventurer
 
trailer Rails's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Location: Pittsburgh PA
Oddometer: 4,566
I can touch the pegs on the ground with Shinko 244s. I don't find them too squirmy but my perspective may be off because that is as close to a road tire that I have ridden in a long time. Don't expect them to last very long with spirited riding, I get about 2000 miles. I don't mind because they are cheap.


trailer Rails is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 04:20 PM   #14
el queso
toda su base
 
el queso's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Location: colinas del norte, california sur
Oddometer: 745
I absolutely hated the MT-21 on the back of my KLR. It only lasted about 500 miles in Death Valley and didn't grip very well either. The front was fine - the rear was a nightmare.
el queso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2015, 05:05 PM   #15
Snowbird
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2008
Location: Where the Great Lakes and Appalachia meet
Oddometer: 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Day View Post
Shinkos ..... 705s
The previous owner had those on my KLR when I bought it used and since I liked them for the mix of riding I do, I've replaced them with fresh ones twice now. Along the lines of what Jim said, they're probably 70% street and 30% dirt, so they match the KLR well. Dirt or packed sand at 70 feels pretty stable. Soft sand under 20, not as much.

Snowbird screwed with this post 05-22-2015 at 06:32 AM
Snowbird is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2015