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Old 09-02-2012, 01:52 PM   #1
gmk999 OP
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Joined: May 2011
Location: New England
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Rookie mistakes

C'mon we all make them, Like today I was taking a hard, low speed turn onto a side street almost 180 degrees, Leaned hard to stay in my lane, but when I throttled up to stand the bike back up. I was in Neutral. I almost kept turning back onto the main rode.
Experience has taught me to handle it. I downshifted and made the turn Ok , But had to laugh at myself for the Rookie mistake after 35 years of riding.


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Old 09-02-2012, 02:05 PM   #2
Seppo
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i´ve got one:
about a week ago, i came home on my ducati. put it in neutral und let the engine run to cool down a little bit. when i wanted to put out the sidestand, i unfortunatley hit the gear lever and put it into 1st gear without the clutch and the engine idling...the bike jumped a feet foreward and luckily stalled then. no damage done, but it would have been easy to drop it.
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Old 12-17-2014, 09:22 PM   #3
Telemarktumalo
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Greasy Lugs

I have one that I just accomplished. Changing tires last night and installing wheels. On the rear wheel, I stared at the lug bolts and decided to apply some of my bicycle maintenance strategy of putting grease on everything. Only after looking in the manual afterward, did I see the warning "Never apply grease to the lug bolts"! Doh! I can remove the bolts and easily dunk them in Simple Green and brush away the grease. But, what about the grease in the rear hub. Any recommendations?
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Old 12-17-2014, 11:10 PM   #4
Bucho
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Originally Posted by Telemarktumalo View Post
But, what about the grease in the rear hub. Any recommendations?

I wouldnt lose any sleep over it if I were you.
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Old 12-17-2014, 11:35 PM   #5
JohnCW
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Trying to start the bike with the kill switch in the on/off?? (you know what I mean) position. Never usually use it just turn off the key. But one day filling up at gas station did before going to pay for the fuel. Forgot that I did and go to start it and dead as door nail. Rest of the rides is waiting to take off and I can't get the bike to even turn. Someone even asked me if the kill switch was the problem, I say no having it locked in my head I've got an electrical problem.

Just about to tell everyone else to take off I'll work out how to get the bike home, when one of the ride walks over and flicks my kill switch. Bike starts immediately.

Verrrrrry embarrassing.
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Old 12-18-2014, 04:17 AM   #6
imnothng
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Had a buddy that just got a new 2 stroke and he fouled a couple of plugs within the first few times of riding it. So we start riding one day with me in front and I notice after a few turns that he is no longer behind me. I head back to find him and he's trying to kick the bike over and over, really working up a sweat. I offer to try and I get a good sweat going. I ask him if it might be the plug yet again or did he forget to turn the gas on, and he says it shouldn't be the plug and of course the gas is on. Since he had another plug on him, we go ahead and change it. The thing still won't start, then I look at the fuel filter and sarcastically ask him if there's supposed to be gas in it. After I turned the fuel on we rode for the rest of the day with no issues.... I gave him a hard time about it for the next few rides.
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Old 12-18-2014, 05:01 AM   #7
trailer Rails
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I would clog up the Internet with my list.


A couple that stand out:

I began riding dirtbikes while living on colorado and my riding buddies were rookies as well. We all ran 20+ psi in fear of getting pinch flats. I moved back east and could not ride at all. Then my buddy turned me on to the joy of single digit tire pressures. Sometimes around here I run 4psi in my rear tire.

Another thing I learned on my own and no one ever told me, the clutch on a bike is not like a clutch on a car. Using the clutch while offroad is mandatory. I don't know how I rode without using a clutch before. Just twisting my wrist.
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Old 12-18-2014, 06:13 AM   #8
Conedodger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
Trying to start the bike with the kill switch in the on/off??
Years ago I was taught to use the kill switch every time I shut the bike down. I never forget to turn it on as it is now habit before every ride. The added bonus is the switch is "tested" every day, so I know it will work if/when I need it.
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Old 12-18-2014, 09:23 AM   #9
BootsandPants
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Was logging a 600 mile day down to Oregon and pulled in for the last gas stop of the day. Pulled up to the pump and stayed on the bike while I took my gloves off and popped the cap. I then shifted the bike's weight to the side in order to get off. At some point in the next half a second, I realized that I had forgot to put the side stand down. Too late; had to lay 'er down . Three seconds later I was laying on the ground with my bike at my feet, the pump attendants and other customers looking on in concern, and me laughing at myself. Popped up, got the bike back up and the pump attendant came over and asked if I was OK. My response was "Yeah man, I'm good at motorcycles" which sent him away laughing.

I blamed it on being on the road for so long that day...but really it was just my general stupidity at the moment .
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Old 12-18-2014, 09:44 AM   #10
xltrider
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Using the rear brake only, my first 2 years of street riding. Back in 1978 and 79. Came from riding exclusively from off road as a teenager/kid. Yikes, never down either though.
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Old 12-18-2014, 09:51 AM   #11
bwalsh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Telemarktumalo View Post
Any recommendations?


Use the straw that comes with it to direct the spray into the holes and hold a rag under it.
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Old 12-18-2014, 09:51 AM   #12
riverflow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BootsandPants View Post
Was logging a 600 mile day down to Oregon and pulled in for the last gas stop of the day. Pulled up to the pump and stayed on the bike while I took my gloves off and popped the cap. I then shifted the bike's weight to the side in order to get off. At some point in the next half a second, I realized that I had forgot to put the side stand down. Too late; had to lay 'er down . Three seconds later I was laying on the ground with my bike at my feet, the pump attendants and other customers looking on in concern, and me laughing at myself. Popped up, got the bike back up and the pump attendant came over and asked if I was OK. My response was "Yeah man, I'm good at motorcycles" which sent him away laughing.

I blamed it on being on the road for so long that day...but really it was just my general stupidity at the moment .
I did that once. I usually put my side stand down as soon as I stop, but I happened to be discussing dinner options with a friend. We decided to eat where we stopped, and I leaned the bike over onto its newly installed SUPER-ULTRA-LIGHT-AS-AIR-GROUND-LEVEL-KICKSTAND and it nearly took out his bike in the process. Don't worry, I'll look stupid enough for the both of us so you don't have to
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Old 12-18-2014, 10:04 AM   #13
bwalsh
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The friction zone

Quote:
Originally Posted by trailer Rails View Post

Another thing I learned on my own and no one ever told me, the clutch on a bike is not like a clutch on a car. Using the clutch while offroad is mandatory. I don't know how I rode without using a clutch before. Just twisting my wrist.
That's one topic I always explain to my students, in the classroom and again on the range, when we get into the slow speed maneuvering parts of the course. Still, they have a hard time grasping the concept of holding a steady throttle and using the clutch to increase or decrease their speed.
They think they'll burn up the clutch if they don't immediately release it(because they would if it were a car/truck clutch). It's a night and day differeance using the friction zone to do slow speed maneuvers verses using the throttle alone.
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Old 12-18-2014, 10:08 AM   #14
High Country Herb
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First long trip with TKC80 knobby tires on my 750 Aprilia. They seemed to handle decent, considering the type of tire. After gaining some confidence in them, I was caught off guard. I came to an intersection a bit too hot, and the car in front of me chose to stop at the yellow light. There simply wasn't enough traction to stop the bike, so I slid into the intersection between the car and the curb (front tire at the edge of traction too). I kept the bike upright, but looked like an idiot. Stopped, looked around, and made a right turn to get out of there.
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Old 12-18-2014, 10:13 AM   #15
Telemarktumalo
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Excellent! Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bwalsh View Post


Use the straw that comes with it to direct the spray into the holes and hold a rag under it.
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