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Old 04-27-2009, 08:08 PM   #1
toolfan OP
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Easy Peasy Bead Breaking - Tire Levers only

I've read about this technique a few times lately - forgive me for not knowing from whom.

Check it out - remove wheel, lay out some tools:


Put your levers in between the tire and rim, like so:


Now, push down on the outer two levers, and UP on the middle (black) lever:


You can see it starting to peel away there. I had to space out my outer two levers a titch more.
Easy as that -


Almost no force required.
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Old 04-27-2009, 08:10 PM   #2
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Check out my new balancer/wheel adapter for balancing my r100gs wheel:



A fellow inmate made that for me.

Works good:
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Old 04-27-2009, 10:25 PM   #3
Skippii
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How about for a tubeless?
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Old 04-27-2009, 10:43 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skippii
How about for a tubeless?
That is a tubeless rim.

Off an 1150GS it looks like....
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Old 04-28-2009, 04:01 AM   #5
R-A-M-O-N
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Very nice, being a real noob at tire repair would you have one with a tube type were you see how to slip in the tube and tire?
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Old 04-28-2009, 06:16 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R-A-M-O-N
Very nice, being a real noob at tire repair would you have one with a tube type were you see how to slip in the tube and tire?
You would be best off checking out the thread 'Neduro's tire changing class' (well, it's really close to that, anyway). That goes into working with tubes, and the full process of the tire change. This technique is strictly one for popping the bead, which is just one (often difficult) part of the job. People resort to c-clamps, leaning sidestands on the tire, driving over boards laid over the thing, etc...
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Old 04-28-2009, 06:46 AM   #7
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I like that method. I also break all beads with just a tire iron and one 10 1/2" spoon. I have always just worked around and around the rim a couple or three times, but I'll have to try this next time. Looks even quicker and easier than what I've been doing, and that way has been pretty easy & quick.(Except the one time I was doing a rear tire while trying to carry on a conversation with 1reddawg. I learned I can't talk and work a bead at the same time )
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Old 04-28-2009, 06:47 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDLuke
You would be best off checking out the thread 'Neduro's tire changing class' (well, it's really close to that, anyway). That goes into working with tubes, and the full process of the tire change. This technique is strictly one for popping the bead, which is just one (often difficult) part of the job. People resort to c-clamps, leaning sidestands on the tire, driving over boards laid over the thing, etc...
+1 to Neduro's thread, found here:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717

I took more pics of the process, but Neduro's thread is much better than I could do, and it's already out there.

Tube type beads are much easier to break, but this technique will work for them as well.

I've been a c-clamper, but this is much quicker and more efficient and it takes fewer tools. I think I you could probably do it on the bike, if you really wanted to.
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Old 04-28-2009, 06:48 AM   #9
toolfan OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1305
I like that method. I also break all beads with just a tire iron and one 10 1/2" spoon. I have always just worked around and around the rim a couple or three times, but I'll have to try this next time. Looks even quicker and easier than what I've been doing, and that way has been pretty easy & quick.(Except the one time I was doing a rear tire while trying to carry on a conversation with 1reddawg. I learned I can't talk and work a bead at the same time )
I actually took the photos on this myself - it's that easy. I was going to wait for my gf to take a photo, but I started to position myself to see how it would work, and I almost broke the bead just putting the levers in!

So, I figured if it's that easy, I'd put the camera on a tripod and take the pic myself.
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Old 04-28-2009, 06:49 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toolfan
+1 to Neduro's thread, found here:
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717

I took more pics of the process, but Neduro's thread is much better than I could do, and it's already out there.

Tube type beads are much easier to break, but this technique will work for them as well.

I've been a c-clamper, but this is much quicker and more efficient and it takes fewer tools. I think I you could probably do it on the bike, if you really wanted to.
I often do mine on the bike to facilitate holding the wheel and being able to turn it as I go around. Then, just pull the wheel and get busy with the irons.
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Old 04-28-2009, 05:00 PM   #11
Django Loco
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Lots of techniques as shown work fine on most bikes/tires/wheels .... but not all wheels/tires!

I've changed a lot of tires in my garage on both dirt and street bikes for many decades.

The other day I ran across a very stubborn one. I've changed rear tires twice on my DR650, no problem. Once on the side of the road. I was able to just stand on the tire and the bead broke. This with a Pirelli MT90 Scorpion tube tire and the stock Trail Wings broke down easy too.

I got another set of wheels. The rear came with a nice Avon Distanzia. Near new. So I ran it. Got 8500 miles out of it. I bought another. Went to change it but could NOT break the bead on the old Distanzia. Keep in mind, the Distanzia is TUBELESS, but the wheel on the DR is for TUBE tires.

I tried every bead breaking technique I know but no luck. I even rode the bike for half and hour. No dice. That bead would NOT POP.

YES, the valve stem was removed. Dish soap was used.

I've changed rear tires successfully on 17" sport bike tires (170 to 180 section) and been able to break the bead. But this Distanzia was tough.

I finally took it to a local shop and they put it on the machine. POP! They got it! The guy said it was like it was glued on!

I like the Distanzia but am reluctant to run it. How would I deal with a
flat on the road? Sure, I can ride it flat (rides really well actually) but
it gets very hot after a while.

Any ideas or reasons why this tire was so tough? One clue: It was on this wheel for over three years, mostly unridden.
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Old 04-28-2009, 08:02 PM   #12
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What techniques did you try?

I've tried a bunch of stuff in the past - this 3 lever method was only slightly more difficult than using the bead breaker that was on the HF, and only because it takes a little more set up time.

I'm going to try it again on a friends bike in the next couple days - it's a mid 90s GS500 and I'm pretty sure it's the stock rear tire - so it's been on there for well over 10 years.
We'll see how it goes.
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Old 04-28-2009, 08:53 PM   #13
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I tried a few different methods.
My tried and true method for tough tires is to use two 2x4's, one foot long piece and one 8 footer. I hook the long piece under my work bench and put the short piece on the tire, working close to the bench. Then lever onto the tire close to the rim using the 8 foot 2x4 hooked under the work bench to lever down on the short piece and onto the tire. Works very well. It sounds complicated but when you see it in action ... it's dead simple. Creates tremendous force.

Using this method I was able to push the tire all the way down flat! ..... but the bead would NOT break.

I also have an actual bead breaker which works OK on dual sport/dirt bike tires. No go with that either, in fact, not even close. This bead breaker is kinda of half assed but OK on dirt bike tires usually. The Distanzia was too
tough.

I also have really good tire irons and tried using all four. No dice. I have two
18" ones and two Ty Davis irons (ones with the red handle). No luck. I used wood blocks to try to increase force/leverage. Nope. Tried forcing an iron past the set bead lip ... couldn't do it.

I was able to do the front Distanzia easily. But this rear one would not let go. I've also mounted TKC's and D606's on my other set of wheels .... no
problems with any of them either .... going off or on.

Man, I would love a real Coate's tire machine! Makes changing tires FUN!!!
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Old 04-28-2009, 09:41 PM   #14
toolfan OP
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Did you do the opposing directions thing with the levers?

The tire I put on this wheel is an anakee - I used it on my old DR650, and I remember it being a pain in the ass to remove... we'll see how it goes in a couple weeks when I replace it again.
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Old 04-29-2009, 06:51 AM   #15
Bigger Al
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Even minute amounts of corrosion on the beads can make breaking the damned things nearly impossible. For whatever reason, the AVon tires seem to be more succeptable to this. Dunno why.
I use the Tyre Pliers bead breaker, and it's never let me down.

http://tyrepliers.com.au/store/index...&products_id=1


One thing to be careful of when using the (very good) method whon by the OP is that the levers will occasionally slip out and find their way to your forehead at a high rate of speed. I've been in the tire biz for a long time, and have the scars to prove it.
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