ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-15-2009, 11:25 AM   #181
sbaumann
bark eatin
 
Joined: May 2008
Oddometer: 5
"I've tried to find the source of the vibration but no look so far. It's fine while we're moving, just when we're stopped the handlebars vibrate and stop only when you pull the front brake, any ideas?"

With the nearly horizontal piston trying to move the bike fore and aft, and the front brake having the ability to stop the front tire from going for and aft, the vibration might be something in your front end. The front end is critically important to directional control, so check everything top to bottom. Handle bar mounts, steering bearings, fork tube clamps, fork bushings, front axle, basically everything in front of the fuel tank. It sucks a lot if the front end goes bad while moving. Maybe it's just a smaller part of the front, like the fender or light assembly, but check the chassis and suspension components very carefully.

With the engine off, lock the front brake, and then push/pull the handlebars back and forth. Hear anything?

The vibration could also be coming from the front brake itself, which may explain why it goes away when you apply the brake. Check that, too.

And awesome adventure. Have fun.

sbaumann screwed with this post 05-15-2009 at 11:33 AM
sbaumann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2009, 11:48 AM   #182
ShiftHead
the f is silent.
 
ShiftHead's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Fort Mill, SC
Oddometer: 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbaumann
"I've tried to find the source of the vibration but no look so far. It's fine while we're moving, just when we're stopped the handlebars vibrate and stop only when you pull the front brake, any ideas?"

With the nearly horizontal piston trying to move the bike fore and aft, and the front brake having the ability to stop the front tire from going for and aft, the vibration might be something in your front end. The front end is critically important to directional control, so check everything top to bottom. Handle bar mounts, steering bearings, fork tube clamps, fork bushings, front axle, basically everything in front of the fuel tank. It sucks a lot if the front end goes bad while moving. Maybe it's just a smaller part of the front, like the fender or light assembly, but check the chassis and suspension components very carefully.

With the engine off, lock the front brake, and then push/pull the handlebars back and forth. Hear anything?

The vibration could also be coming from the front brake itself, which may explain why it goes away when you apply the brake. Check that, too.

And awesome adventure. Have fun.
Yeah, I would check that the neck bearings are tight. have someone pick Dot up just behind her neck, and see if her head is a bit wobbly.
ShiftHead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2009, 12:43 PM   #183
petefromberkeley
-
 
Joined: May 2004
Location: Berkeley, CA
Oddometer: 3,292
You should be able to get the Iran visa on the spot in Delhi (things change with current politics though). I have never gotten one in Nepal though. When you get to Delhi you should look this guy up http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=267233

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...nal+friendship

ADVrider extraordinaire
petefromberkeley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2009, 02:50 PM   #184
petefromberkeley
-
 
Joined: May 2004
Location: Berkeley, CA
Oddometer: 3,292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhodie
Pakistan is a bit sticky at present - avoid Quetta and NWFP.
Iran -if you can get a visa- will be a delightful change to the rest of the sub-continent.
The Iranian people are wonderfully hospitable and unlike the perceptions that exist of a "fundementalist nation".
I you cannot get a visa fly in to Turkey or one of the Stans.
Whilst in Pai or around Chiang Mai look up riders on the
http://www.gt-rider.co forum.
Cheers
Rhodie




You pretty much have to go to Quetta since it's on the way to the only open border crossing into Iran. You will be given a police escort for that area. They literally sit outside your hotel room door holding a machine gun all night and drive with you during the day. You probably shouldn't go to the Swat valley or NWFP now which is a shame because it's beautiful- as is the area around Gilgit. If you don't get a visa for Iran, you may see Gilgit, because the only way around Iran is to take the KKH (spectacular) to China, pay the Chinese a ton of money to escort you to Tajikistan or Kyrgyzstan and go over Iran. Take the ferry from Turkmenistan across the Caspian and boom, you're in Azerbaijan. Then onto Turkey and Iran is behind you. That would actually be a really fun ride, but the China part would slow you down paperwork wise. And missing Iran would be a terrible shame.

Speaking of paperwork, you DO have a Carnet right? I have always thought it is absolutly impossible to get into Iran with a vehicle and not have a Carnet, but David at Stantours recently suggested there might be a way. He may be able to get you an Iran visa even though others have failed. He is really good at visa support. If you end up going through the stans, he is indispensable. www.stantours.com


edit: You are going to need the Carnet for India anyway, so I hope you have it already.

petefromberkeley screwed with this post 05-15-2009 at 03:41 PM
petefromberkeley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 03:49 AM   #185
nathanthepostman OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Oddometer: 610
Dot's definitely on her way

It's a sad day. Dot's gone. She's in a box. Preparing for take-off.

Yep, today i went to the shipping company, whipped off her handlebars, footpegs and front wheel and did my best to keep the dimensions down. I'd be warned by many of the tricks these companies use to hike up the bill so I was kinda ready for them.

But they have you by the balls.

The woman i've been dealing with could only give me an approximate price because the box was still to be made and that price might change a bit. Down she even thought.

But then you ask for clarity and you hear that it could also go up, it's likely to go up. No more than 10 percent she reckons. And i hope not with it already up to 425 quid. What's that; about 500 or more $?

And I just think it's because she was shocked by how small we'd got it. You could see the commission draining from her eyes. So they have to find another way to sting the foreigner. But I had it in Australia where they inflated the price by 50% so I'm not grumbling.

I'm now just booking myself a flight. I can save 60 quid if I fly via india so I might do that.

And yep, i certainly have got a carnet. I applied for it in Rockhampton as I rode up Australia's east coast and had it sent to the son's house of a woman I met at a tea stop in Brisbane. She said if I ever needed anything I should give him a call. So I did, and asked if he could recieve my mail - the carnet and the new registration docs for Dot.

His dog bit me when I picked it up. It really drew blood and I had to have tetanus. So yeah, alll good with the carnet.

The info on Iran and visas really helped. Thankyou for that. I should be hearing back in the next few days from the visa company I'm using, but they don't sound optimistic with me being English. Fingers crossed. But at least it sounds like there's plenty of options.

Will post a vid and some pics shortly but just wondered if you'd be interested in this; it's just something I've knocked up to see if I can get some more general interest in the trip. It's about motorcycle adventurers. I'd be interested to know if you guys think it's accurate; you know, the bit about why we do it.

Regards
Just nathan, no dot.



Travelling the world by motorbike. We’ve all seen Ewan McGreggor and his mate do it. Long Way Down, Long Way Around; the pair of them jumping on expensive motorbikes and riding to earth’s every sacred corner with a team of medics, mechanics and film crew in tow. But what’s it really like, who are the people living this dream off their own back, without any corporate support or the glittering flash of fame to greet them at the end?

Well I shall try my best and tell you, because I’m a 29 year old Englishman currently riding from Australia to England on a moped called Dorothy.

Three months ago me and Dorothy, or Dot for short, left Sydney, headed north to Darwin, crossed to East Timor before riding along Indonesia, over to Malaysia then on to Thailand where we currently are now. Nepal is next, then down into India and on through Pakistan, Iran and Turkey until we reach Europe and the last leg home. So far we’ve covered 18,000 kilometres and reckon to have the same again to go.

That’s a lot for Dot. On a slender budget she’s all I could afford; a five year old decommissioned Australian Post bike bought from auction and fitted with a long range tank and panniers. With a 105cc engine and 80km/h flat-out-downhill-wind-behind-us top speed she might be slow, but she’s tough and easy to fix; a crucial ingredient in the wild’s of this vast fascinating world.

Despite 60,000 km/s on her clock she’s in rude health, even with all the weight she has to carry. Clothes, electrical gear, spares, tools, camping gear… me. It’s a lot for a little bike originally designed to potter around the streets. Sometimes, if the hill is so steep, I have to get off push. Once, when I camped by the road In Indonesia, it took me two hours to shove her out of a ditch. Then the bitch wouldn’t start.

My budget for everything, including the bike, the visas and all the living costs for the trip was 5.000 pounds. That was for a four month crossing. With delays and visa issues that’s going to take longer, maybe six months, so the budget has gone up, but only slightly, because on the road, in these countries, I spend no more than ten pounds per day. That’s for food, shelter if I’m not in the tent, and petrol. Those on bigger bikes like McGreggor need more because shipping and paperwork costs are calculated on the vehicles weight and value. It makes it cheaper for me riding Dot.

Some riders manage to get sponsorship and corporate funding. It’s a massive help. All I have, and all you need. to get started is a bike, the necessary paperwork - called a Carnet de Passage - to get your bike over the borders and the necessary tourist visas for the rider. Getting those involves many frustrated hours waiting in line at embassies where you begin to realise that riding’s the easy part of an overland trip. It’s the logistics and formalities that grind you down.

That’s where, as an adventure motorcyclist, you have two options. Plan or just go. Some take years to outline the perfect trip. They know where they’ll stay, the road they’ll take ,and the places they’ll visit along the way. Others, like me, just make it up. Set off on a whim and have total faith that things will work out along the way.

I only had 16 days left on my visa when Australian immigration said I had to go. I’d already had the trip in mind but suddenly, with the window of opportunity briefly open, a distant dream became an overnight reality. In two days I packed and planned and rushed around town picking all sorts of stuff. Tool kits, a storage box, tent, sleeping bag and clothing. Then I set off, leaving just two weeks to cover the 5000 kilometres to Darwin. For me it was the best way. Keep me focused and moving. And so began a life in a tent or hotel room. Up at dawn to ride in rain and across landscapes you’ve never before seen. Lost, alone, on the road, your home is your bike now

A typical day would have me wake at 5am, pack up my tent, skip breakfast, hit the road and for the next 14 hours just keep riding. As Dot can only cruise at 65km/h that gave us a realistic daily distance of 600 kilometres. At night we’d eat a banana sandwich, find a place to pitch the tent, sleep, then wake up and do the same thing again. It was like that across Indonesia, too, where my error in applying for a one month visa not two meant we had to cross this vast island chain without barely stopping. It was five thousand kilometres across Australia, six thousand across Indonesia.

My main worry, always, is having an accident or taking ill. Who will scrape me up off the road and ensure Dot and my belongings are safe while the hospital glues me back together? There’s no safety net on this tight-rope. Slip and fall and you’re on your own. Sometimes you worry too long about this and feel utterly vulnerable, which you are, but there’s no point thinking about it. In truth, on the road, the past and future barely exist. You don’t worry about yesterday or tomorrow, just on getting somewhere, in one piece, today. Total focus with no wasted energy on things that can’t be changed. Always in the zone; you could say that.

As for loading the bike, everything has a place, a purpose and necessity if it’s to avoid being abandoned as waste. You become attached to these things. I give them names and ask how they all are in the morning. We’re brothers, on the same quest, surviving in conditions their maker never intended. Clothes, laptops, cameras and footwear. All working overtime, being tossed around in accidents and crashes and in terrain they‘ve never been tested. But on we march. Together, a band as one.

That’s why it’s so upsetting when you have to say goodbye to something or see it lost. Hats, gloves, penknives and socks, casualties along the way for which you mourn. I now have to ditch some weight if Dot’s going to climb the hills of the Himalayas. The first thing to go will be clothes, but only once I’ve torn a off a piece of fabric to be tied around Dot’s handlebars. They’ve earned that place, deserve that place.

So why do we do it; to sight-see and send postcards? Nah. We’re escaping, running from something that in our minds make us go. Boredom, the routine of life, a relationship, an inadequacy, you can escape them all on the road. That is until you stop for a while and they quickly catch up. You will be sat, merry in the moment around a campfire or at a table having lunch, when WHAM, they come right back having pursued you all this way across the globe.

But solitude; it’s a mesmering sensation. One where you feel true and unsmudged. You can be you, you are you, not the one at home you think should be you. There’s no act, no face or front. Raw, bare and naked. Finding yourself. There’s no bigger cliché but that’s the truth. Only here are you faults and flaws completely exposed. You see yourself. Am I really like that, why have I not seen that before? It’s not always nice, but necessary, if you’re going to get more from this trip than a bedtime story.

I don’t know what Ewan and Charlie experienced on their trip, where their personal journey took them. The act for the camera must have been tough. To put on a smiling showbiz face when really all they wanted to do was sit and relax, think, stop, listen, look. Breath. Take in the magic of their adventure and get drunk on it. I imagine they yearned and longed for that.

Just to be alone and free. The life of a motorcycle adventurer.
nathanthepostman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 04:06 AM   #186
OneOff
Gnarly Adventurer
 
OneOff's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Location: S.E.Qld
Oddometer: 253
Phark mate, that says it all perfectly.. I'm gunna copy it and keep it, ok?
__________________
'14 Yamaha Super Duper Tenere XT1200ZE
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=546710
OneOff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 05:21 AM   #187
kuyaoli
Gnarly Adventurer
 
kuyaoli's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
Oddometer: 320
I agree, sounds great.
__________________
2012 Kawasaki KLX250S
kuyaoli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 05:28 AM   #188
Game over
Haha
 
Game over's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Texas
Oddometer: 137
Kinda reminds me of this guy

Keep an eye on wilson and another on the road. Good luck on you next leg.
Game over is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 05:30 AM   #189
river_rat
Perplexed
 
river_rat's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Oshkosh, WI
Oddometer: 652
awesome. If that doesn't get some press time in the motorcycle rags, I don't know what will
__________________
If I return before I get back, tell me to wait I'll be right there.

There are three kinds of people in this world, those that can count, and those that can't.
river_rat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 06:06 AM   #190
nathanthepostman OP
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Oddometer: 610
Thanks chaps, feel free to copy at will, but Game Over was right; it is a bit desert island. Just reflected a mood i've been in. Maybe I need to see one of those ping pong shows to snap me out of it.

As for Ragin Rabbi's question about my travelling companion that's a long and lengthy story perhaps better saved for another time. But let's just say she's the reason I was in Australia in the first place, the reason I came up with the idea for this trip, the reason I'm now on it, and rather ironically, the one thing I'm most at risk of losing while it's underway. She just visited for a few weeks. I think secretly she was after Dot.

Anyway, here's that vid I promised;






nathanthepostman screwed with this post 05-16-2009 at 06:36 AM
nathanthepostman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 06:11 AM   #191
pcdoc54
Gnarly Adventurer
 
pcdoc54's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Middle Island, NY
Oddometer: 212
I don't know what you plan on doing for a living

when your trip is done, but if you don't seriously consider travel writing, the world will have missed out on an exceptional talent!

Your writing is fantastic, the way you blend stories and facts, and the photos and film clips you include ... you might not have the corporate backing that others do, but I would bet it wouldn't take much for you to get it so that you can continue doing what you obviously love so much, and what we are all enjoying the hell out of as you write it.

Thumbs up mate, keep us all glued to our chairs and all the best for the rest of your trip.
pcdoc54 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 06:13 AM   #192
Game over
Haha
 
Game over's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Location: Texas
Oddometer: 137
Nothing but respect for you. Keep on having a great time, all the toil is obviously worth it, even if sometimes you have a hard time wading through the red tape. You have already seen more of the world than most of the people in it....That is simply amazing.
Game over is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 06:36 AM   #193
jonesaus
n00b
 
Joined: May 2009
Oddometer: 1
amazing stories so far, thanks for letting us tag along :P
jonesaus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 07:00 AM   #194
fyr
iRoast Coffee
 
fyr's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Location: Bytowne, Canuckistan
Oddometer: 1,270
Subscribed!
I love this type of shit.
__________________
"Best thing though, is I can just sit and stare at it with a big fat cigar in my yap and have that shit eatin grin.."
10 Ypan Patrol-07 Bonnie T100-84 R65
fyr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2009, 09:20 AM   #195
kjames
Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Dubai.
Oddometer: 40
what a great read..

+ 1 on the travel writing. Imagine if you could get paid to do that sort of stuff.

Good luck.

Karl
kjames is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014