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Old 06-09-2009, 11:13 AM   #1
markas OP
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F800GS Rear mudguard

I have seen some pictures of dirty rear suspensions.Sometimes the mud is just TOO much! Check this photo:

Its from Dert Gerl and was posted here:http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...&postcount=417
I think a rear mudguard is something more than necessary , even for a rainy day , not to mention in extreme mud conditions like seen in the photo!
So , why not post some photos with your solutions to this problem? Here is a small rear mudguard from Wunderlich to start:


I think it is impressive that BMW Is not yet selling such a part as an extra (to my knowledge at least) even if it has an obvious use.
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Old 06-09-2009, 11:17 AM   #2
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Both of these mudguards have been covered here before. But here's the Mudsling that I've installed on my F800. Goes on very easily, and does the job.



You can get it at Adventure Designs.

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Old 06-09-2009, 11:54 AM   #3
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I have seen 2 or 3 solutions for this while lurking the past months , until i suddenly had a good deal from my BMW dealer and made an order. The posts where random and it will be a bit difficult to find all again.So , unless i missed a thread about this , any help choosing a good solution would be appreciated.
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:22 PM   #4
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$159 for a piece of plastic , two screws and a zip tie?!

Why is everything for this bike so bloody expensive....
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:59 PM   #5
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Injection moulding isn't cheap and it's the economy of scales.. how many are they going to sell to recoup their investment in the moulds?

Make your own and see what you come up with
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Old 06-09-2009, 01:03 PM   #6
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Speaking from experience:

I have had both the Wunderlich and the Mamo rear mudguards. They both do the same thing equally well. The thing that separates the two products is installation - the Mamo piece is a SUPERBLY made product in terms of fit and ease of installation.
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Old 06-09-2009, 01:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whitham_wannabe
$159 for a piece of plastic , two screws and a zip tie?!

Why is everything for this bike so bloody expensive....
Well, if you could go down to your local Home Depot and buy a flat piece of plastic, and then have it magically morph into the proper shape on your way home, with pre-drilled holes and all, then maybe $159 would be expensive. But what you're paying for here is the designer's and engineer's years of education and expertise, the prototyping, and the sourcing of materials, and the manufacturing of a relatively small-volume item.

That's why.

Nobody's holding a gun to your head. You don't HAVE to buy one if you don't want to. But just be thankful it doesn't have to be FAA certified. Then it would cost $1599!

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Old 06-09-2009, 01:40 PM   #8
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Again , another post from a fellow advrider , thelouv this time , about Wunderlich: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...0&postcount=15
His photo :


Another , different product ,is a Fiberglass one at f800depot made by Skidmarx.You can find this here
Personally, i don't think it suits the Of road character of the F800GS , but the price is $179.99 , not bad at all for anyone who likes it.

markas screwed with this post 06-09-2009 at 02:03 PM
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Old 06-09-2009, 01:52 PM   #9
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And a thread at vendors i obviously missed and perhaps interests many F800GS owners : http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=468063 , discount for advrider members!

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Old 06-09-2009, 02:07 PM   #10
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Eh? Bit steep, isn't it ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodWorks
Well, if you could go down to your local Home Depot and buy a flat piece of plastic, and then have it magically morph into the proper shape on your way home, with pre-drilled holes and all, then maybe $159 would be expensive. But what you're paying for here is the designer's and engineer's years of education and expertise, the prototyping, and the sourcing of materials, and the manufacturing of a relatively small-volume item.
Well, here:

http://www.800gs.de/viewtopic.php?t=...r=asc&start=30

someone else went to his local Home Depot and bought a curved piece of plastic (wastewater PVC tubing). On his way home, he thought about cutting it into two matching pieces which he screwed with three screws together and with another three within half an hour to his bike.

Therefore, he spent only about 10$ for the designer's and engineer's years of education and expertise, the prototyping, and the sourcing of materials, and the manufacturing of a relatively small-volume item.

That's why he can spend now 152$ on designer mud to splatter onto it...
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Old 06-09-2009, 02:47 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R75/5
Therefore, he spent only about 10$ for the designer's and engineer's years of education and expertise, the prototyping, and the sourcing of materials, and the manufacturing of a relatively small-volume item.

That's why he can spend now 152$ on designer mud to splatter onto it...
Well, I can spend nothing and fasten on a piece of an old, plastic garbage can I have sitting out in my backyard with bailing wire and duct tape. Does that make for a better solution? Is that your idea of design and engineering expertise?

The question (for me) isn't whether or not you can find a cheaper way of protecting the shock from mud. Of course you can! But I'd rather spend $159 on a well-designed and engineered piece of plastic that fits the look of the bike, does the job to perfection, and will stay on the bike under heavy use, than $10 to hang an ugly piece of sewage pipe back there that's going to fall off within the first 100 miles.

Your mileage, etc., etc.

David
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Old 06-09-2009, 02:52 PM   #12
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Old 06-10-2009, 02:11 AM   #13
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Ok David, now I switch the irony off (sorry, one of my bad habits) and give you a honest reply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodWorks
Well, I can spend nothing and fasten on a piece of an old, plastic garbage can I have sitting out in my backyard with bailing wire and duct tape. Does that make for a better solution? Is that your idea of design and engineering expertise?
I'm a strict "form follows function" guy.
The function of a mudguard doesn't need to be discussed.
That leaves the question: Does a mudguard need to be pretty (= a well designed piece of art)?
First of all let me agree with you that I also wouldn't like to have one that is so "ugly" that it sticks out like the proverbial sore finger. However, while the mudguard/fender of the front wheel should even in my books better look good, I would say what an auxiliary mudguard for the rear wheel of the F800 is concerned, which is placed under the tank, hidden behind the wheel and next to the chain, etc ..etc, it should be, if well designed, at best be unnoticeable.
I think so far we can agree, can we David? (If not, I would advise you to have a look at the new aftermarket carbon fiber rear spash-guards and not to read further, because there wouldn't be much common ground for a purposeful discussion anyway.)
So to answer your question:
If both criteria (serves it's functional purpose and is optically unnoticeable) are fulfilled on all competing solutions, then I would say: Yes, cost effectiveness is my criteria for a better solution.

Which brings me to the (Ver-) Wunderlich "mudguard" which I have seen in action.
And I have seen it in action in heavy mud.
While I would consider this thing as a useful "splash guard" for road use in rain, the sordid scenes I was forced to witness convinced me that as a mudguard it serves only a purpose if you feel like stopping every ten miles and take a screwdriver to remove the clogged up stone/mud-cake out of that thing. My pal did get finally so annoyed, he took it in the end off.
But again: I don't want to offend folk that is happy with that thing, I just mention this to illustrate that maybe you should better not draw general conclusions from the price of some assessory on it's true real world functionality.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodWorks
The question (for me) isn't whether or not you can find a cheaper way of protecting the shock from mud. Of course you can! But I'd rather spend $159 on a well-designed and engineered piece of plastic that fits the look of the bike, does the job to perfection, and will stay on the bike under heavy use, than $10 to hang an ugly piece of sewage pipe back there that's going to fall off within the first 100 miles.
Well David, as you see from my nick, I am - what BMW is concerned - old school and in that light there is actually quite a lot that I could reply on this David, but let me instead just share with you a little story that doesn't tell much about BMW aftermarket mudguards, but rather a lot about the apparent state of mind of the people who buy them these days (and thus answers maybe whitham_wannabes question).

This dude there had the same problem than you or markas or I have.
He found for himself a solution that is very well mounted (PVC plastic blade (1.5mm strong) wedged between tank and fender and soundly bolted on: no zip-ties, no fiddlesticks) and doesn't look offensive at all. The color of the material he used is just slightly different than the rest of all the ABS plastic of that bike and you really don't notice that it's not stock if you wouldn't know beforehand.

He notices that quite some people share his problem and - well we're all fellow BMW riders, aren't we - agrees to make his solution available for others, too.
So he offers his solution as a private seller for a mere 20$ fixed price, which reimburses him for the cost of the material + the shipping, on ebay and throws even a flier describing the installation into the bargain.

Well, to cut a long story short, It doesn't sell very well. Ironically most people who did actually display some interest complained in the and that it's too expensive.

After some contemplation (and let's say more as a kind of sociological experiment than as serious business opportunity) he tripled the price.

Then he sold quite a few.

Go figure.

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Old 06-10-2009, 04:06 AM   #14
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I am not sure that they look like garbage.The dude made good work it seems , all the people in the forum who bought it are happy with their purchase as i read (i know a bit German). When they heard about the Mudsling price they where like:WTF etc. Here is a photo from their thread to whoever didn't bother reading the whole German:

Doesn't look like a garbage can at all i must say. More photos at the site. R75/5 , My German is a bit rusty , why don't you tell the Dude that made this to write something here in English , every F800/650GS owner needs a rear mudguard , better cheap and well designed than expensive and well designed i say
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Old 06-10-2009, 06:53 AM   #15
WoodWorks
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Ich kann auch ein wenig Deutch sprechen. Und Ich habe gar kein Problem mit diesen Schutz. Billig? Sicher! Aber schön ist es nicht!

And I agree with most of what you guys say. But I don't find $159 too much to pay for what I consider a well-designed piece of gear (unlike the Wunderlich offering, BTW), and am happy to support vendors who make the effort to produce and sell them. The more manufacturers out there willing to take a risk on making some good accessories for our bikes, the more options guys like markas are going to have. Everyone has a price. But I find this repeating "You paid WHAT for that?" theme a little tiresome.

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