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Old 01-01-2013, 01:00 PM   #1
Red Devil OP
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Automatic Clutch (Postie) Help!

I'm experiencing an issue with my Postie where when down shifting, it seems as though the clutch is released to quickly and the bike will jolt and decelerate suddenly into that gear rather than the revs lifting and it being a smooth shift.. is this because I'm not keeping the revs high enough during a downshift, or should I look at adjusting the clutch as per the instructions in the manual?

The instructions advise how to adjust the clutch, but not what the actual adjusting changes so I'm hesitant to fiddle with it without a bit of expert knowledge.

Any thoughts?
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Old 01-01-2013, 02:52 PM   #2
Quirky
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I havn't been near a postie for a long time 15 years or so. But what you describe sounds nornal to me.
In my un-knowledgeable opinion, I am thinking that if it was stalling in gear or the clutch was slipping without engine lugging down would be more of an adjustment issue. Give it heaps & try matching throttle to gear/groundspeed for making it a tad smoother.
I'm sure there's lots of postie guru's that will be along shortly.
Philth were are you? Dairy farmers are experts on posties I reckon.
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Old 01-01-2013, 03:08 PM   #3
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Cheers Quirky, once I get it back together (hopefully today if the parts arrive) I'll have a crack and see if that helps, I may have been dropping the throttle entirely, shifting, and then reapplying throttle - it's a bit weird not having the manual clutch inbetween. I was mainly concerned because the bike did allegedly have a new clutch, or some work done to the clutch about 12 months prior to me purchasing it but it had not been ridden much since and didn't want to fiddle with the adjustment not knowing what it did..things tend to stop working if I do that
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Old 01-01-2013, 09:53 PM   #4
WILL_S
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Adjust the clutch per manual
You are adjusting when it engages/disengages
The gear lever works like a clutch lever when pushed





Quote:
CLUTCH

Adjustment:

The clutch is adjusted with the engine off. Remove the cover protector (1) and loosen the adjuster lock nut (2).
Turn the clutch adjuster (3) clockwise one turn; do not turn excessively.
Slowly turn the adjuster counterclockwise until a slight resistance is felt.
From this position, turn the adjuster clockwise 1/8 turn, and tighten the lock nut.
After adjustment, test ride the motorcycle to be certain the clutch operates properly.
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Old 01-02-2013, 07:41 PM   #5
slapper
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I'm gonna go all simplistic here without asuming too much about your bike riding experience - I could be way orff the mark, but it makes the explanation simpler!

when you push the gearshift forward or back, it also pushes the clutch plates apart for you - same way as a "manual" clutch. When you release the lever and it springs back to center, this "manual clutch action" also releases - leaving only the centrifugal action to do any more "clutching". As you're already spinning the engine fast enough ( and dowshifting is going to spin it up even more), chances are the centrifugal clutch is going to be pretty much engaged, giving no slip to help you with smoothly pulling the motor up to higher revs.

So, you need to come off the gear select pedal "a bit gently" like you would with a manual clutch - and you need to rev the engine whilst you're pressing the gear select (ie. the "manual" clutch is disengaged) the same as any other bike/car.

Treat the gear shift action like a clutch - to go down a gear step on the pedal, twist the throttle to match revs and gently release the pedal. It's the same action as any other bike, it's just that your foot's doing both gear select and clutch disengage/engage!

Hope that helps :)
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Old 01-03-2013, 01:28 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slapper View Post
I'm gonna go all simplistic here without asuming too much about your bike riding experience - I could be way orff the mark, but it makes the explanation simpler!

when you push the gearshift forward or back, it also pushes the clutch plates apart for you - same way as a "manual" clutch. When you release the lever and it springs back to center, this "manual clutch action" also releases - leaving only the centrifugal action to do any more "clutching". As you're already spinning the engine fast enough ( and dowshifting is going to spin it up even more), chances are the centrifugal clutch is going to be pretty much engaged, giving no slip to help you with smoothly pulling the motor up to higher revs.

So, you need to come off the gear select pedal "a bit gently" like you would with a manual clutch - and you need to rev the engine whilst you're pressing the gear select (ie. the "manual" clutch is disengaged) the same as any other bike/car.

Treat the gear shift action like a clutch - to go down a gear step on the pedal, twist the throttle to match revs and gently release the pedal. It's the same action as any other bike, it's just that your foot's doing both gear select and clutch disengage/engage!

Hope that helps :)
Hey slapper! Thanks for that post man, it made a lot of sense actually and I was trying it out on the ride home today and I know exactly what you meant - I think I was treating the bike a bit like an automatic car in the sense that I wasn't trying to match revs and just letting it do it's thing.

Thumbs up mate, makes perfect sense!

I've ridden manual bikes before no problem, but I guess removing the clutch left me in the lurch
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:44 PM   #7
rabbitears
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Hi mate

I'm not an expert by any means but I did have a postie for a few months. What you're experiencing sounds normal to me. You do need to give it a bit of gas when you're changing down (just like a manual bike) otherwise it will jerk. The tricky bit is that you can't release the clutch gently or progressively on the postie - as soon as you click the lever down, it dumps you fairly sharply into the lower gear. Edit: just noticed that Slapper's experience was that you could release the pedal gently - maybe I have that wrong in that case!

It's just a question of getting used to the bike (which are usually very good and practical).
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