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Old 06-24-2009, 04:00 PM   #91
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I believe the hooks are on the roof to attatch ladders to for maintainence since it is a slate roof. Someone else might have some more info on that, but that is my understanding.
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Old 06-24-2009, 07:15 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMead11
I believe the hooks are on the roof to attatch ladders to for maintainence since it is a slate roof. Someone else might have some more info on that, but that is my understanding.
makes sense to me! :-)

cheers - and thanks again for this awesome RR

Shane
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Shaggie screwed with this post 06-25-2009 at 01:36 PM
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Old 06-24-2009, 07:36 PM   #93
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We took the last part of the day on the autobahn, so we were soon back on the Moselle. I did take a little detour in the woods above the river valley and these are the resulting images.






When we got back to Thorsten’s a feast awaited us. Thorsten doesn’t eat meat, so he had some different stuff, but I had this wonderful plate of food with veal, potatoes, and this round ball is a Kartoffelkloesse, in English, a potato dumpling. It would not be complete without the local wine of course.







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Old 06-24-2009, 07:50 PM   #94
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The next morning, June 1, 2009, we attended the Berg Cup Race near Bitburg. It was a hill climb race with many different categories of cars ranging from the smallest up to former Formula race cars. It was a great thing to get to go see. We sat in the woods along the road that had been closed for the event. It reminded me of when I was a kid and would go to motocross races with my parents. It was a great thing to get to see.

But first...some baby swans on the side of the Moselle River.....
















and here is the neighbors 320i.....


















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Old 06-24-2009, 07:52 PM   #95
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Old 06-24-2009, 07:53 PM   #96
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Old 06-24-2009, 08:08 PM   #97
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More pictures at the auto race.....





























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Old 06-24-2009, 08:23 PM   #98
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The rest of the day was just some eating, relaxation, a little spin around the village by Thorsten on the TransAlp.....






Freddie was exhausted and took a nap.......


As did Mr. Nike.......











Thorsten packed to return to his condo.....he had to go to work the next day....




In the morning I would be leaving here for a while to go visit France.....
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Old 06-25-2009, 08:59 AM   #99
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First of all, fantastic thread

Secondly, I'm going to kick my mate in the nuts for sending me this link (and a certain female who sent it to him - she knows who she is )

Thirdly the pictures of Vogelsand gave me serious flashback

Stayed there a few times as a 'guest' so I will be forwarding your pics to mates of mine.

Guy in the top left is a Brit squaddie....

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Old 06-25-2009, 09:59 AM   #100
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great RR

keep it coming, i'm in!

nice photography, interesting stories, and fun to read.

Even though i live in Germany, i have never explored the region you've been touring!

:-)
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Old 06-25-2009, 11:08 AM   #101
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In the morning on ate Year="2009" Day="2" Month="6">June 2, 2009ate>, I got up at a reasonably leisurely pace and soon ended up getting on the autobahn at Wittlich and headed for Luxembourg. You always want to gas up in Luxembourg as they have some of the cheapest gas you can find. I stopped at the last station before entering France and filled it up to the top. A guy was filling up next to me, he had a Honda Deauville. What a cool bike they are, again one of the things I do not understand why Honda does not offer this bike in the USA. I have been disappointed in the Honda lineup for years, as I guess many others are. All the bikes I would buy from them they do not offer in the USA, and this is one of the ones I really like. As a matter of fact it was on my list of possibilities when shopping for a bike for Europe, but the TransAlp is better for me really as I then do not have to give much thought to going off road, and Africa is so close, I imagine that we will end up there eventually. I haven’t been to Africa since 1994 so I should be thinking about it again. Anyway, I chatted with him for a while, he was on his way to the Alps for a two week riding trip. He thought it funny that so many Americans want to come over to Europe when most Europeans love the idea of traveling in the United States. He dreams of the Route 66 ride. I think more people would do it if it weren’t so expensive to rent a bike.


I got off the freeway at the next exit and hit the back roads, with my destination eventually being neat Laon, France, but I had a few things to hit along the way. The Zumo sent me on a lot of strange roads and even down unpaved roads. I thought it weird to hear my Australian English Zumo girl tell me to turn on the unpaved road, but it turned out to be some great riding.














I soon caught something out of the corner of my eye and turned back to check out this old bunker.











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Old 06-25-2009, 11:31 AM   #102
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Nearby was the village of Fillieres and this small cemetery, erected as a result of the losses from the August 1914 offensive.











There was an even larger cemetery in nearby Pierrepont.






With a German section attached on one side.


And here is the battlefield.








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Old 06-25-2009, 11:42 AM   #103
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One of my big destinations for the day though was a place that I had never been to before. The American monuments of the Meuse Argonne Campaign. Sadly, I had passed near these places many times in the past, but had not hit them yet. I had been giving a lot of thought to Frank Luke. Once or twice a year I take a group of my students to the state capitol in Phoenix for a field trip, and there is a statue of Frank Luke there right in front of the building. In last October's ride report I posted a picture from Sky Harbor of a plane they had in the airport done up to replicate Frank Luke’s plane.

I thought it was time to finally go to this region, find his grave, find the village he was shot down in, and then when I talk about him in history class, I can show the pictures of my trip relating to it also.

First stop was the Montfaucon American Monument.

From the ABMC website:
The World War I Montfaucon American Monument is located seven miles south of the Meuse-ArgonneAmericanCemetery and Memorial and 20 miles northwest of Verdun. It consists of a massive granite Doric column, surmounted by a statue symbolic of Liberty, which towers more than 200 feet above the war ruins of the former village. It commemorates the American victory during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive during the period ate Year="1918" Day="26" Month="9">September 26, 1918ate> to ate Year="1918" Day="11" Month="11">November 11, 1918ate>, when the American First Army forced the enemy to conduct a general retreat on this front.


This is what I expected to see.....

This is what I got to see.....I guess I will have to come back another time.








There was an old church directly behind it, which was showing the destruction of being in a strategic location.












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Old 06-25-2009, 12:26 PM   #104
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Just seven miles down the road was the Meuse Argonne American Cemetery and final resting place of Frank Luke. I was also interested in finding Freddie Stowers grave also, as he was the only African-American to wind the Medal of Honor in the First World War.








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Old 06-25-2009, 02:33 PM   #105
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I found many other MOH recipients while looking around.


First was Harold W. Roberts.....

*ROBERTS, HAROLD W.
Rank and Organization: Corporal, U.S. Army Company A, 344th Battalion, Tank Corps. Place and Date: In the Montrebeau Woods Franceate Month="10" Day="4" Year="1918">4 October 1918ate>. Entered Service At: San Francisco, Calif. Birth: San Francisco, Calif. G. O. No.: 16, W.D., 1919.
Citation:
Cpl. Roberts, a tank driver, was moving his tank into a clump of bushes to afford protection to another tank which had become disabled. The tank slid into a shell hole,
10 feet deep, filled with water, and was immediately submerged. Knowing that only 1 of the 2 men in the tank could escape, Cpl. Roberts said to the gunner, "Well, only one of us can get out, and out you go," whereupon he pushed his companion through the back door of the tank and was himself drowned.




Then I found Oscar F. Miller....


*MILLER, OSCAR F.
Rank and Organization:Major, U.S. Army, 361st Infantry, 91st Division. Place and Date: Near Gesnes, France, ate Month="9" Day="28" Year="1918">28 September 1918ate>. Entered Service At: Los Angeles, Calif. Birth: FranklinCounty, Ark. G. O. No.: 16, W.D. 1919.
Citation:
After 2 days of intense physical and mental strain, during which Maj. Miller had led his battalion in the front line of the advance through the
forest of Argonne, the enemy was met in a prepared position south of Gesnes. Though almost exhausted, he energetically reorganized his battalion and ordered an attack. Upon reaching open ground the advancing line began to waver in the face of machinegun fire from the front and flanks and direct artillery fire. Personally leading his command group forward between his front-line companies, Maj. Miller inspired his men by his personal courage, and they again pressed on toward the hostile position. As this officer led the renewed attack he was shot in the right leg, but he nevertheless staggered forward at the head of his command. Soon afterwards he was again shot in the right arm, but he continued the charge, personally cheering his troops on through the heavy machinegun fire. Just before the objective was reached he received a wound in the abdomen, which forced him to the ground, but he continued to urge his men on, telling them to push on to the next ridge and leave him where he lay. He died from his wounds a few days later.







Then finally Freddie Stowers......

*STOWERS, FREDDIE
Corporal Stowers, a native of Anderson County, South Carolina, distinguished himself by exceptional heroism on ate Month="9" Day="28" Year="1918">28 September 1918ate>, while serving as a squad leader in Company C, 371st Infantry Regiment, 93rd Infantry Division. His company was the lead company during the attack on Hill 188, Champagne Marne Sector, France, during World War I. A few minutes after the attack began, the enemy ceased firing and began climbing up onto the parapets of the trenches, holding up their arms as if wishing to surrender. The enemy's actions caused the American forces to cease fire and to come out into the open. As the company started forward and when within about 100 meters of the trench line, the enemy jumped back into their trenches and greeted Corporal Stowers' company with interlocking bands of machine gun fire and mortar fire causing well over fifty percent casualties. Faced with incredible enemy resistance, Corporal Stowers took charge, setting such a courageous example of personal bravery and leadership that he inspired his men to follow him in the attack. With extraordinary heroism and complete disregard of personal danger under devastating fire, he crawled forward leading his squad toward an enemy machine gun nest, which was causing heavy casualties to his company. After fierce fighting, the machine gun position was destroyed and the enemy soldiers were killed. Displaying great courage and intrepidity, Corporal Stowers continued to press the attack against a determined enemy. While crawling forward and urging his men to continue the attack on a second trench line, he was gravely wounded by machine gun fire. Although, Corporal Stowers was mortally wounded, he pressed forward, urging on the members of his squad, until he died. Inspired by the heroism and display of bravery of Corporal Stowers, his company continued the attack against incredible odds, contributing to the capture of Hill 188 and causing heavy enemy casualties. Corporal Stowers' conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroism and supreme devotion to his men were well above and beyond the call of duty, follow the finest traditions of military service and reflect the utmost credit on him and the United States Army.










Then Frank Luke Jr.....








*LUKE, FRANK, JR.
(Air
Mission)

Rank and Organization:Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps, 27th Aero Squadron, 1st Pursuit Group, Air Service. Place and Date: Near Murvaux, France, ate Month="9" Day="29" Year="1918">29 September 1918ate>. Entered Service At: Phoenix, Ariz. Born: ate Month="5" Day="19" Year="1897">19 May 1897ate>, Phoenix, Ariz. G. O. No.: 59, W.D., 1919.
Citation:
After having previously destroyed a number of enemy aircraft within 17 days he voluntarily started on a patrol after German observation balloons. Though pursued by 8 German planes which were protecting the enemy balloon line, he unhesitatingly attacked and shot down in flames 3 German balloons, being himself under heavy fire from ground batteries and the hostile planes. Severely wounded, he descended to within
50 meters of the ground, and flying at this low altitude near the town of Murvaux opened fire upon enemy troops, killing 6 and wounding as many more. Forced to make a landing and surrounded on all sides by the enemy, who called upon him to surrender, he drew his automatic pistol and defended himself gallantly until he fell dead from a wound in the chest.




Then Fred E. Smith.....

*SMITH, FRED E.
Rank and Organization:LieutenantColonel, U.S. Army, 308th Infantry, 77th Division. Place and Date: Near Binarville, France, ate Month="9" Day="29" Year="1918">29 September 1918ate>. Entered Service At: Bartlett, N. Dak. Birth: Rockford, Ill. G. O. NO.: 49, W.D., 1922.
Citation:
When communication from the forward regimental post of command to the battalion leading the advance had been interrupted temporarily by the infiltration of small parties of the enemy armed with machineguns, Lt. Col. Smith personally led a party of 2 other officers and 10 soldiers, and went forward to reestablish runner posts and carry ammunition to the front line. The guide became confused and the party strayed to the left flank beyond the outposts of supporting troops, suddenly coming under fire from a group of enemy machineguns only
50 yards away. Shouting to the other members of his party to take cover this officer, in disregard of his danger, drew his pistol and opened fire on the German guncrew. About this time he fell, severely wounded in the side, but regaining his footing, he continued to fire on the enemy until most of the men in his party were out of danger. Refusing first-aid treatment he then made his way in plain view of the enemy to a handgrenade dump and returned under continued heavy machinegun fire for the purpose of making another attack on the enemy emplacements. As he was attempting to ascertain the exact location of the nearest nest, he again fell, mortally wounded .











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