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Old 07-28-2009, 04:20 PM   #31
Twistn'roads OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ooobah-Moto
..... one more question

I noticed you're using a Garmin 276 (...I am as well). How did you manage the Mapsets as you traveled through Canada and the US? Did you upload the a general corridor you meant to stay inside (thus using the 512mb card) - or did you use your laptop and reload the appropriate mapsets when necessary?
I'm still using Garmin City Navigator NA V8. You'll find, as I'm sure you already know, that the Garmin maps in less populated regions take less memory space on the data card even though they may represent greater geographical area. Less POI I guess. I pretty much just loaded the mapset that encompassed my planed routes + a few more just in case! I did make on the fly route changes but the maps I had on the 512mb card covered my changes. The mapset for this trip was only 270mb, so I had lots of space on the card. Also, I was running mapsource on my Dell Mini 9 so I could make major map changes if needed.

FYI, also I set the track resolution to "time" and set the value to 5 sec. I wanted a more accurate track for geo tagging purposes. My gps ran for the entire time I was riding every day and then some and I never ran out of available track points. I would download the track at the end of each day.

Steve
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Old 07-29-2009, 05:37 AM   #32
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Day 11

"When you are everywhere, you are nowhere.
When you are somewhere, you are everywhere."


~ Rumi



Day 11 – June 22
Hyder, Alaska (Sealaska Inn)
Today’s mileage: Not very much, Trip to date: holding





This morning I slept in and it felt good! Today I would hang around Hyder and stay another night. I liked it here. I found it a rather unique and interesting place. After 10 days of traveling, I wanted to take a rest, do some laundry and take care of some minor motorcycle maintenance. It was a brilliant sunny morning.





I opened the door to my room only to discover that none of my new friends had left yet, nor were they even up and about. All the motorcycles were still sitting in front of the Inn waiting for their riders. I guess these folks didn’t buy into the “early bird gets the worm” nonsense or perhaps the camaraderie of the night before had influenced their motivation this morning. Now I understood why Phil, John and Dean arrived at their daily destinations so late in the day! Eventually John and I hooked up and struck out in search of breakfast. I had a craving for some bacon and eggs.





After breakfast I headed back to the Sealaska where I found “the family of 4” slowly getting packed up. I can’t imagine it being all that easy traveling as a family on motorcycles, especially with all the extra gear needed. I know for myself, it took me a good hour or more after I got up each day to take down my camp, have some simple breakfast, pack everything up, gear up and be on my way. I guess it didn’t help matters much that they were also trying to solve a mystery about a missing shoe! I don’t think that they ever did find that shoe when I talked with them days later.











One by one John, Phil then lastly Dean, headed over to the Canadian border. I can’t quite remember the exact circumstances in the planning of the arrangements, but I would meet up with Phil and the guys at Phil’s log home in Wasilla, AK later in my trip. Phil had mentioned that his wife was away on a fishing trip and they had the house to themselves. When the cats away, the mice play! I think I asked him if it would be OK to set up my tent in his back yard. Anyway, Phil asked “so you’ll be coming then?” I assured him I would be there.





Gradually as all the travelers left, the Sealaska Inn grew quite. I stood outside alone enjoying the morning sun. I decided that I would take a ride back up the Salmon Glacier road to take a few more photographs. I enjoyed the ride up yesterday so much. Later, when I got back, I met Michelle. Michelle and Gary are the proprietors of the Sealaska Inn. Michelle was busy making up the vacated rooms. I told her to not bother with mine because I had my gear strewn all over the place and it wasn’t a pretty sight. I was trying to dry out my tent and air out my riding shorts. We talked a bit about some of the wildlife in the area just as an eagle flew overhead. I mentioned to her that I had not seen any bears this trip yet and was having difficulties trying to get some decent photographs of eagles. My camera really wasn’t up to the task. Most animals I had encountered so far were always at a distance. Michelle would take me out to a good eagle viewing spot at the end of the wharf later that evening.


There are bears here. I have the evidence!




























After all my chores were done for the day, I walked over to “the Bus” for some fresh halibut & chips and and an "Alaskan Amber", yum! For any of you that come to Hyder, this is a must do. The locally caught seafood is fantastic!





Some random pictures from around Hyder




























Later, Michelle took me down to the end of the wharf to see eagles. I made a lame attempt at photographing one. I do need to get a better camera! While there Karen, who works at the Sealaska, and her boyfriend came down to try and fly a new kite. They had some difficulty! I ended the day socializing with Gary & Michelle and some of the colourful locals at the Sealaska bar.






























Oh, and one more of “stoopid shit” you do while under the influence!


Twistn'roads screwed with this post 07-29-2009 at 06:09 AM
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Old 07-29-2009, 05:58 AM   #33
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That family of 4 started their own ride report several weeks back and I was surprised to see your picture of them. Small world there mustn't be many roads up there if you keep meeting up with these people.
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Old 07-29-2009, 06:17 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnewt
That family of 4 started their own ride report several weeks back and I was surprised to see your picture of them. Small world there mustn't be many roads up there if you keep meeting up with these people.
They were a fun bunch! There are plenty of roads; we just all happen to be headed the same way. There are only so many gas stations! I was amazed at how many fellow travelers I'd keep meeting up with. A certain camaraderie would develop. It was a great experience!

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Old 07-29-2009, 09:13 AM   #35
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Day 12

No! There's the land. (Have you seen it?)
It's the cussedest land that I know,
From the big, dizzy mountains that screen it
To the deep, deathlike valleys below.
Some say God was tired when He made it;
Some say it's a fine land to shun;
Maybe; but there's some as would trade it
For no land on earth - and I'm one.

Verse 2, “The Spell of the Yukon

~ Robert Service ~





Day 12 – June 23
Hyder, Alaska > Junction of the Cassiar & Alaska Highways, Yukon
Today’s mileage: 697.3 km, Trip to date: 7181.2 km





I packed my motorcycle this morning in a steady downpour. I knew this was coming. I had checked the weather report yesterday. I would ride in rain most of the day, at least until Dease Lake where things would clear up some. Too bad, there was a lot of great scenery that I wouldn’t be able to see today. I did however see my first “live” bears. One, a good sized black bear, crossed the road in front of me shortly after I got back on the Cassiar. It took it’s time crossing and actually paused to stare at me. Of course, I had my camera packed away due to the rain. I was frozen just watching him anyway! A little later on I rounded a rocky outcropping with a big Grizzly atop it! I slowed as quickly as I dare on the wet road surface and scrambled to get my camera out all the time watching the bear in my mirrors. I was actually shaking! I saw him stand up on his hind legs, sniff the air then vanish into the forest before I could even get my gloves off, shit! It would have been a fantastic photograph.

As the morning ride continued, I started to get cold again. So a quick stop to put on my heated jacket and I was good to go. My shitty high-tech “waterproof” gloves on the other hand, soaked up water like a sponge. I would eventually buy a cheap pair of PVC coated work gloves that would keep my hands quite dry on future rain days. There would be some new challenges today as well. The many wooden and steel deck bridges along the Cassiar can become quite slippery when wet so caution is advised.

While getting gas at Dease Lake, I met up with Billy on his heavily loaded BMW again. We talked about our plans for the day and the potential road conditions ahead. We couldn’t help notice the state of all the vehicles coming down the Cassiar from the north. They were covered in a thick brown coating of muddy goo. Not a good sign! Eventually I would find the source of the “goo”; the last remaining section of gravel on the Cassiar and it was under construction. Initially it didn’t seem all that bad I thought. The road surface was actually drying out but just for “shits & giggles”, mother nature decided to direct a local shower my way. The road very quickly turned to a slippery muddy mess and to make matters worse, I had a very aggressive RV right on my ass. I guess he was seeking payback; I had passed him earlier in the day! These road conditions would be good practice for what lied ahead in a few days!

I camped that day at Junction 37 Services. I found this campground to be adequate at $15/night but the washroom / shower facilities were pretty “crusty” and that’s being nice. The worse mosquitoes of my entire trip lived here. There was a car wash area that I was able to use to try and rinse the mud and bug goo from my bike. Oh, and don’t build a fire anywhere but in the designated communal fire pit or the “nice” campground lady will tear a strip off you!

I went across the street that evening to have dinner at Sally’s Café, a great little spot. The food was really good. It’s only a small place with limited seating. A local couple, Gerry & Sandra came in and had no place to sit. I invited them to join me at my table. I had a very enjoyable meal talking with and getting to know these folks and learning about their horses. They had a small farm just down the road towards Watson Lake.


One more of Bear Glacier, I couldn’t resist as I went by.

















































Ah! Bugs & Bud!





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Old 07-29-2009, 11:20 AM   #36
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Day 13

You come to get rich (damned good reason);
You feel like an exile at first;
You hate it like hell for a season,
And then you are worse than the worst.
It grips you like some kinds of sinning;
It twists you from foe to a friend;
It seems it's been since the beginning;
It seems it will be to the end.

Verse 3, “The Spell of the Yukon”

~ Robert Service ~


Day 13 – June 24
Cassiar & Alaska HWY junc > Whitehorse, Yukon (Robert Service Campground)
Today’s mileage: 434.5 km, Trip to date: 7615.7 km




I woke to clear skies and sunshine. Today would be a nice weather day, a bit on the chilly side to start, but nice. I was headed to Whitehorse today on the Alaska Highway. The traffic was light and the road in very good condition with only a few construction areas. I was making very good time. I stopped at Teslin for fuel after crossing that long, steel grated bridge. I imagine that would have been a hoot in rain! As it was, I really took my time. Later on when I met up with my friends at Phil’s place in Wasilla, John told me ran out of gas in the middle of the bridge, yikes!

I got to Whitehorse very early in the afternoon. Tomorrow, I had an appointment scheduled at Yukon Honda for some new tires and an oil change. I thought I’d head directly there to see if they could squeeze me in today. My tires were there waiting for me. Les & Catherine at Dualsport Plus in Stoney Creek, Ont. had shipped them up weeks earlier. Matthew at Yukon Honda was a great guy to deal with. He was able to fit me that afternoon, excellent! This would give me a head start on the Dempster Highway the next day. There were a number of other motorcyclist there having tires and work done to chat with while I waited.

I camped at the Robert Service Campground in Whitehorse >

http://www.robertservicecampground.com/

I highly recommend this place! The atmosphere was quite fun, with many friendly people. They have wifi available at the common area, showers, and all the firewood you can cut and carry back to your site for $4. The other nice thing is that it’s walk in only, unless of course you ride a motorcycle, which you can ride to your site. There are no RV’s! I shared my fire that night with a couple of other motorcycle travelers headed back home. We talked and shared stories well into the night not really paying attention to the time. I looked at my watch and it was well past midnight and it was still very light out! This was a weird transition for me. Also, I was starting to lose track of time (changing time zones) and what day of the week it was and I didn’t mind at all!






























Camp Life!










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Old 07-30-2009, 07:07 AM   #37
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Day 14

I've stood in some mighty-mouthed hollow
That's plumb-full of hush to the brim;
I've watched the big, husky sun wallow
In crimson and gold, and grow dim,
Till the moon set the pearly peaks gleaming,
And the stars tumbled out, neck and crop;
And I've thought that I surely was dreaming,
With the peace o' the world piled on top.

Verse 4, “The Spell of the Yukon

~ Robert Service ~


Day 14 – June 25
Whitehorse, Yukon > Tombstone Mt Campground, Dempster Highway, Yukon
Today’s mileage: 570.8 km, Trip to date: 8186.5 km



It was always in my plans to bail on the “Dempster” portion of my trip if the weather was foul. By all accounts of everything I had read and heard from other riders, the Dempster highway could turn quite muddy and treacherous if there was any amount of rain. I did not plan to change my dual purpose Tourance tires for knobbies. I was relying on dry conditions. The weather forecast for the next 3 days was outstanding! I was elated! I would get the opportunity to ride the most northern road in Canada to Inuvik, another of my milestones.

It was another brilliant morning, clear and sunny. I packed up my camp quickly and didn’t bother firing up the stove for breakfast. I stopped at the Tim Horton’s for a large coffee and maple pecan danish. Whitehorse has all the necessary amenities!

The Klondike Highway had a number of areas under construction but nothing that really gave me problems. I just looked at it as “practice”. There was one section north of Pelly Crossing that was being graded. You did have to be careful when negotiating the grader “wake”. Traffic on this road was sparse. There were RV’s and campers but not as many as back on the Alaska Highway. I did start to see many more “adventure” touring motorcycles, some headed back south and others the same direction as me. I continued to take hordes of photographs at every opportunity.

Sometime in the afternoon, I caught up to a pickup pulling a camper with Ontario plates. I had not seen many Ontarians out here so I gave him a honk and a big wave as I overtook him. Later, while stopped at the Tintina Trench overlook this fellow pulls in as well. It was an elderly couple, Jr. and Brenda, from Kingston, Ontario. We struck up a conversation and I learned that they were headed up to Inuvik and planned to camp at the Tombstone Mountain campground 70 km up the Dempster Highway. Same here!

I stopped for fuel at the Klondike River Lodge at the start of the Dempster. This place was a hub of activity for all kinds of travelers. It makes sense I guess because there was no fuel or supplies for miles if you were traveling north or south on the Dempster. There were a number of motorcyclists gathered here, some having completed the journey down and others like myself, getting ready to go up. Because of the distance, 370 km to the next available fuel at Eagle Plains, I decided to buy another 4 liter fuel can for added insurance. Also, I wasn’t sure if there was potable water at the campground so I filled my 6 liter dromedary bag as well. At the same time as I was struggling to try and strap this additional ballast to my bike, Jr. and Brenda arrived to top up their fuel. As we were both going to the same place for the evening, Jr. offered to carry my gas and water. Excellent! This would allow me a bit less weight as I got used to the gravel I would be riding for the next 1300 km! We would meet later and camp beside one another at Tombstone Mt campground. They were a nice and hospitable couple and I would learn much more about their lives during camp “happy hour”.

Almost immediately as you start the northward trek up the Dempster, the scenery is spectacular as you travel through mountains. I passed several motorcyclists coming down the highway. We would wave to one another as most motorcyclists do but I noticed the waves I received in return were much more friendly and animated than the usual “two fingers to the road”. I recall one rider giving me a big thumbs up. I had a feeling that this was going to be an epic adventure; an experience I would never forget.










A Loon in the morning reflection, Twin Lakes, Klondike Highway









5 Finger Rapids, Yukon River













Pelly Crossing





View from the bridge, Stewart Crossing





Tintina Trench overlook





Random pictures from the first 70 km of the Dempster Highway

























My new friends, Jr. & Brenda from Kingston, Ontario





Tombstone Mountain Campground









My back yard that night, the sound of this river lulled me to sleep


















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Old 07-31-2009, 06:27 AM   #38
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Day 15

"Yesterday is ashes; tomorrow wood. Only today does the fire burn brightly."

~ Inuit Proverb


Day 15 – June 26
Tombstone Mt, Dempster Highway, Yukon > Inuvik, Northwest Territories
Today’s mileage: 666.1 km, Trip to date: 8852.6 km



During my planning for this trip, I had allowed myself 4 days to take the Dempster up to Inuvik and back. Getting my bike serviced in Whitehorse a day early gave me a head start. I would take advantage of the clear weather conditions and long daylight hours to go all the way to Inuvik today.

My neighbours, Jr. and Brenda, were up pretty early too. They were already pulling out of their campsite as I was making coffee and packing up. Jr. came over to say good bye and return my 12v battery charger I had loaned them the night before. Brenda’s camera batteries were dead and they had no way to charge them out here. What a shame it would have been not to have a working camera on this road! We thought we might meet up again later that day at a campground near Fort McPherson. This was not to be but I knew I would see them again sooner or later. There only is the one road!

Heading north that morning, again I was in awe of the scenery around me. It was a landscape that I had never experienced before. At times it was almost a distraction. Even though the road was in good condition, I needed to keep a keen eye out for the odd bone crunching pothole and loose gravel. I could not imagine driving through this wondrous place within the confines of a car or RV. I was out there in it. I was part of it.

























Not far along I would encounter oncoming transport trucks. You had to be careful around these guys. They could easily throw up a wall of blinding dust and flying rocks. You could spot them coming by the bellowing dust clouds on the horizon miles ahead! As they approached I would slow down and pull to the side of the road. I found that many of the truckers were very courteous and would slow down too as they passed by me. I quick wave and off I’d go again.

The other hazard of the day would be grader “wake”. What is this you ask? As a grader works his way across the road surface, a berm of lose gravel develops in the wake of the blade passing. This can prove to be pretty tricky to negotiate on a motorcycle as you pass the grader!

Not far from the Ogilvie Ridge overlook, I pulled off the road into a clearing to transfer the gas from the can I was carrying to the bike tank. As I removed my helmet and ear plugs I couldn’t help notice how incredibly silent and peaceful it was. This beautiful solitude reminded me how far away from my life at home I had come. There was a high stony ridge and on it passing travelers had erected many inuksuit.

“Inukshuk (singular), meaning "likeness of a person" in Inuktitut (the Inuit language) is a stone figure made by the Inuit. The plural is inuksuit. The Inuit make inuksuit in different forms and for different purposes: to show directions to travellers, to warn of impending danger, to mark a place of respect, or to act as helpers in the hunting of caribou. Similar stone figures were made all over the world in ancient times, but the Arctic is one of the few places where they still stand. An inukshuk can be small or large, a single rock, several rocks balanced on each other, round boulders or flat. Inuit tradition forbids the destruction of inuksuit.”

In a spur of the moment I decided to climb up the ridge and build one of my own. This trivial gesture held a greater meaning for me.






“I came this way”
















I got to Eagle Plains around 1:00PM. I fuelled up and took a short break to think about my plans for the rest of the day. While gassing up the attendant told me of a motorcycle accident a couple of days ago just down the road from the way I had come. The rider had lost control of his bike in a rough section of road and crashed. He had to be airlifted to the south. This was a sobering reminder for me not to get too complacent. The weather conditions were perfect so decided to continue on.

About 36 km north of Eagle Plains you will come to the Arctic Circle and the sign marking it. The landscape here is pretty amazing. It is still mountainous but totally void of trees. As most do, I took this opportunity to take a number of photographs. I could have easily turned back at this point and been content. I had reached my true intended goal of getting to the Arctic but the “adventurer” that I had become wanted more.






















The Dempster Highway would take on a different and more mischievous personality from here on. Around the Northwest Territories border, I encountered grading, construction and road repair that would last almost the entire way to Inuvik. It was extremely dusty and the gravel was quite loose and deep in areas. I had a number “butt clenching” moments where I almost lost control. I found that standing up on the pegs does really make a difference in these kinds of conditions. My heavy, overloaded motorcycle with dual purpose tires was becoming a handful. I really had to take my time. It was going to be a long afternoon! I could see how this road would be absolute crap if it rained.














After plenty of dust, 2 ferry crossings and several bouts of self doubt in my decision to go this far, I made it to Inuvik! It was going on 9:00PM when I rolled into Jak Territorial Park just outside of town. I was feeling pretty tired and stressed. My last challenge for the day would be setting up my tent on the wooden tent pad in the gusting wind that had developed. This strong breeze was actually a godsend because the mosquito population here was quite prolific! After a warm shower and a healthy ration of rum I felt pretty good. I sat at the picnic table updating my journal. The mental haze was waning and the clarity of this day’s achievement was slowly sinking in. I stayed up past 12:00 AM just to see the midnight sun. What an incredible day!






























Midnight Sun


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Old 07-31-2009, 07:11 AM   #39
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I hope you took coordinates for your little creation. Set it as a geocache!
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Old 07-31-2009, 07:20 AM   #40
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Sure did!

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/23889580

Zoom out on the Google Earth map beside the picture....

~TR~
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Old 07-31-2009, 10:52 AM   #41
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Day 15 Video Clips

Here are some video clips of riding in the loose gravel on the Dempster Highway north of the NWT border >












Twistn'roads screwed with this post 03-11-2010 at 09:46 AM
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Old 07-31-2009, 02:40 PM   #42
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Beauty

This is one very comprehenisve ride report. Love it. Especially the elevation charts. Reminds me of the Tour.. Thanks for taking us along. Hyder, Sally's, Whitehorse .... many of my favorite places. Loving the Dempster experience as well.
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Old 07-31-2009, 10:54 PM   #43
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amigo

1) where is the crisis? I only see great pictures, some bad ass scenery and one great time!! are you not liking this ?

2) More pictures!!! por favor!

3) thank you for posting, it is my dream ride

damasovi

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Old 08-02-2009, 09:40 AM   #44
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I think over again my small adventures, my fears, these small ones that seemed so big. For all the vital things I had to get and to reach. And yet there is only one great thing, the only thing. To live to see the great day that dawns and the light that fills the world.

~ Inuit Song


Day 16 – June 27
Inuvik, Northwest Territories > Eagle Plains, Northwest Territories
Today’s mileage: 370.2 km, Trip to date: 9239.6 km



Dark gray skies and a cold wind greeted me this morning. The weather was obviously changing. After packing up, I headed into Inuvik. I needed gas and wanted to pick up a few souvenirs. There’s a really good visitor center as you come into Inuvik. The very cute young lady working there was a wealth of information about the town. I learned, because this was Saturday, many of the shops would not be open until 10:00AM. I had some time to kill so she directed me to a coffee shop downtown. As I was leaving, I checked the updated weather forecast posted on the bulletin board and my heart sank. There was a high probability of rain today and again for the next several days. I knew the road conditions would deteriorate in the rain but I could not afford the time to wait it out in Inuvik. I had a new sense of urgency. I have to leave but not before I pick up a few things.














At one of the shops, I met up with a couple of riders that I had talked to the day before at the Mackenzie River ferry. Again, I’m sorry, I don’t recall their names. They had arranged a charter plane to take them up to Tuktoyaktuk on the Arctic ocean but the pilot had indicated that they may not be able to fly today due to low cloud cover and poor visibility. They invited me to join them. I very politely declined. I had other pressing plans.

I eventually found the items I was after and left Inuvik in haste much later in the morning than I had hoped. Not very far from town, I found myself back into the freshly graded Dempster gravel. A light rain had started and the sky to the south was very dark and threatening. Because it was the weekend, the Dempster was void of construction crews and transport truck traffic luckily for me! I did have to pass one grader early on. The light rain gave way to a steady downpour and the loose gravel changed to thick mud. I knew then that I was getting in over my head. I have no off-road motorcycle experience and must confess that I found the present riding conditions rather frightening. It was all I could do to keep my heavy V-Strom upright on two wheels. I traveled miles in first gear with the “outriggers” deployed, barely averting numerous spills. The road was very rutted and churned up. Some may think this dangerous and reckless but I would seek out what appeared to be the firmest surface even if it meant riding on the wrong side of the road. I would always try to work my way back to the right side as I approached a blind rise. There was no turning back now. I swore to myself that I would never get myself into a situation like this again!


The Only photo I took of the road, just before it turned muddy





Traffic on the Dempster was almost nonexistent that day. The few vehicles I encountered were very courteous and cautious as they passed me. I think they knew I had my hands full! I did see Jr. & Brenda again as they came off the Mackenzie River ferry hauling their mud caked camper. I feel bad that I did not give them a wave. I could see that they recognized me but I dare not take my hands off the handlebars as I negotiated my way through the muddy ferry gravel ramp. Also that day, I came across a couple of very miserable looking cyclist riding their bicycles north. We gave each other a nod. These extreme conditions were difficult for me but I could not imagine riding a bicycle. These folks definitely had my respect!

Eventually I would ride out of the mud near the Yukon border but not before going through a mountain pass that offered the greatest challenge and worst conditions of the day. Coming out the other side thinking I was almost in the clear, I experienced a very strong crosswind to further test my nerve and motorcycle handling skills.

As the Arctic Circle marker came into view, the sunshine returned and the Dempster Highway dried. I had not taken many photographs or video today for obvious reasons so I pulled in for a break. For awhile I was there alone. I stood in the warming sun admiring the view. I experienced such a wave of relief having traveled through some of the most extreme motorcycling conditions of my life unscathed. I felt so alive at that moment.






















I would get a room at Eagle Plains that night. My friends, the “atk_nut” family, had arrived there just ahead of me. They had come south through that same mud! So much for the “clean” family vacation! A number of motorcyclists would eventually show up here including the guys I had left behind in Inuvik. We talked over dinner. They never did get their flight up to Tuk. The pilot would not fly out in those weather conditions. They razzed me about not getting an “official” certificate of achievement having traveled the Dempster Highway from the cute young lady at the visitor center who they also claimed, was trying to talk them into staying in town that night. Bugger! She didn’t offer me one and I’m not going back to get it! They would carry on to Dawson that night and invited me to ride along with them. I was staying put. I had enough adventure for one day! There would be many a tall tale that evening. Today I was a humbled rider.


Dirty girls!







Twistn'roads screwed with this post 08-02-2009 at 10:16 AM
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Old 08-03-2009, 04:28 AM   #45
waterlilly
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Steve
This is a great report, your photos are great, thanks for your daily update.

Cheers
Lilly
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