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Old 08-13-2009, 01:22 PM   #31
JeremyZ
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I haven't seen it mentioned yet, but I think it is time to start looking into Lemon Laws.

He seems to have been sold a bike worth several thousand dollars. It broke down, through no fault of his own, and the manufacturers are shrugging their shoulders.

If the dealer says they can't or won't fix it, and Kawasaki says the same thing, they owe you a new bike or a refund.

If not, I bet you can sue the pants off them, and win. When/if it comes to this, remember to sue for lawyer costs, cost of time off work, cost of getting the bike home, etc. Make it clear to Kawasaki that it will be MUCH cheaper to give you a new bike or a refund.

Although I love my KLR so far, I have to admit that I had considered the roughly equivalent Suzuki, Honda, and was sad that Yamaha's XT660 is not available here.

It starts to seem that one way Kawasaki keeps their costs down is by forgetting their customers directly after the sale.

Keep us informed of how this turns out.
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Old 08-14-2009, 07:45 AM   #32
Arkman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NICO
Not this time. What he is going through is the result of a whole bunch of shit product making it to the showroom floor. Kawi has addressed it, allegedly, but it is what it is now. Many sub-standard motors on the road right now because of it. Very unfortunate. Used to be the only the a KLR owner had to worry about was doin' the doo.

I have an 08 KLR that I've ridden the holy piss out of, and have taken on many long road trips (some three and four state trips talking 600/700 miles) and never had a single issue. Not one. No oil issues, no mechanical issues of any kind. That's my experience with owning a KLR.

I don't consider my bike a shit product. Actually, it's one of the best bikes I've ever owned.. and this is my 5th.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 08-14-2009, 11:41 AM   #33
Blackout
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Just posted this on KLR650.net:

[rant]

Holy *$#!@! shit!! I just got off the phone with the dealer. They told be the reason that my KLR is burning so much oil is that some "fine dust" made it past the air filter and got into the cylinder and that this is not covered under warranty (i.e., it's my fault!)! Seriously, they sell this bike as a dualsport bike (implying it is offroad capable) and yet they put a filter on it that can't keep dust out?!! It's freakin' 3 months old!!! Now they want to charge me $300 just to tell me what's WRONG with it!! Of course I'm getting the same run-around as everyone else "You can call Kawasaki and see if they will work with you blah blah blah......".

Why is it that we have to do all the work on these freakin issues. They sold the bike, they KNOW there are issues, THEY should have to talk to Kawasaki, not all the individual buyers.

So now, we are required to not only check the oil every 100 miles, but apparently we must also clean/change the air filter every 100 miles (or more appropriately, realize when the "dust" we are riding on is too small to be kept out of the air intake)!! I was brand-loyal until this little incident, now I think it is time to start exploring other options. Having to dump another $1000 into a 3 month old bike?? For something that would appear to be a design flaw and should be covered under warranty?? I would hope that I'm not the only one that has taken this bike offroad. Are we seriously supposed to stop at the end of the pavement now and say "oooohhh, better not ride on that dirt road, the dust looks a little too fine..."

As much as I have loved this bike until this point, I just can't get behind a company that considers these issues normal, or the fault of the purchaser.

My .02

[/rant off]
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Old 08-14-2009, 12:01 PM   #34
Solo Gato
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackout
Just posted this on KLR650.net:

[rant]

Holy *$#!@! shit!! I just got off the phone with the dealer. They told be the reason that my KLR is burning so much oil is that some "fine dust" made it past the air filter and got into the cylinder and that this is not covered under warranty (i.e., it's my fault!)! Seriously, they sell this bike as a dualsport bike (implying it is offroad capable) and yet they put a filter on it that can't keep dust out?!! It's freakin' 3 months old!!! Now they want to charge me $300 just to tell me what's WRONG with it!! Of course I'm getting the same run-around as everyone else "You can call Kawasaki and see if they will work with you blah blah blah......".

Why is it that we have to do all the work on these freakin issues. They sold the bike, they KNOW there are issues, THEY should have to talk to Kawasaki, not all the individual buyers.

So now, we are required to not only check the oil every 100 miles, but apparently we must also clean/change the air filter every 100 miles (or more appropriately, realize when the "dust" we are riding on is too small to be kept out of the air intake)!! I was brand-loyal until this little incident, now I think it is time to start exploring other options. Having to dump another $1000 into a 3 month old bike?? For something that would appear to be a design flaw and should be covered under warranty?? I would hope that I'm not the only one that has taken this bike offroad. Are we seriously supposed to stop at the end of the pavement now and say "oooohhh, better not ride on that dirt road, the dust looks a little too fine..."

As much as I have loved this bike until this point, I just can't get behind a company that considers these issues normal, or the fault of the purchaser.

My .02

[/rant off]
this answer from the dealer is dealer bullshit; push it up the chain, the same dust is on the highway as is on dirt. if it got past the filter then the filter wasnt installed properly. talk to kawasaki usa right away. push push push and holler alot, call everyone at kawasaki; they will eventually move on this. the filter is faaaar better then the stuff in the seventies and you would have a power loss first from low compression and thats not what killed your engine. you followed the service schedule for air & filter changes and its not your fault. find another dealer too.
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Old 08-14-2009, 12:44 PM   #35
VStromNC
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Certainly sound like the dealer is feeding you a bunch of BS! WTF kind of response is that after buying a bike from that dealer while also getting it serviced by the same dealership.

I would start with local BBB and Kawasaki USA. I've had two KLR's and currently have a 95 KLX650C and have never experienced any issues other than having to replace the automatic cam chain tensioner with a manual model. These engines are bulletproof or so I thought.

Jon
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Old 08-14-2009, 12:54 PM   #36
RoberTx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TravisThumb
I bought a brand new 09' KLR for my dream trip to Alaska. It had 84 miles on it when we left on 07/17/09.

.......................................

This trip took over a year to plan. ................
You planned for over a year for this trip then took off for Alaska on a bike that wasn't even broke in yet? That was not very good planning.
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Old 08-14-2009, 01:35 PM   #37
bush pilot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoberTx
You planned for over a year for this trip then took off for Alaska on a bike that wasn't even broke in yet? That was not very good planning.
Especially on a bike that is notorious for little things like not having any grease on the swing-arm bearings when they roll off the assembly line.
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Old 08-14-2009, 01:42 PM   #38
RoberTx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bush pilot
Especially on a bike that is notorious for little things like not having any grease on the swing-arm bearings when they roll off the assembly line.
Exactly, even a BMW would require some research and prep for such a ride, even more so for a KLR.
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Old 08-14-2009, 02:30 PM   #39
Karlonz
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The KLR, in particular, requires careful running-in. Probably wasn't the best plan to load up and head out and break-in the engine at the same time, as it is especially susceptible to issues if allowed to work and labor under loading...and constant speeds (read: highway) during this period. With a bike fully packed for a long trip (heavy!), the bike was probably not really allowed to freely spin through the gears without bogging the engine down.

The KLR's a great bike and very bulletproof, but it has to be run-in correctly for it to be this way.

If I were in your position, and Kawasaki weren't going to resolve this, I'd look at getting a Shnitz 685 kit and put this experience behind you. I'm not sure whether what happened here would be covered by Kawasaki (sorry, but had to say it) warranty repair/replacement. Good luck
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Old 08-14-2009, 02:59 PM   #40
Kbetts
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There is a discussion on the KLR650.net site .......

http://www.klr650.net/forums/showthr...t=69985&page=3

Starting with post #40.....

The discussion revolves around the shock cooling of the cylinder causing it to go out of round. The theory goes that the improved air flow of the '08- KLR due to a better cowling will cause enough rapid cooling to cool the bottom of the cylinder skirt unevenly causing it to go out of round.

IMO, this fits the facts perfectly. Most bikes were at speed when they developed oil problems meaning they had max load and max cooling. The KLR radiator set up can cause the temp needle to visibly move through half it's range under these conditions.

KHI needs to get on this and investigate it immediately, IMO.
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Old 08-14-2009, 03:06 PM   #41
Blackout
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karlonz
The KLR, in particular, requires careful running-in. Probably wasn't the best plan to load up and head out and break-in the engine at the same time, as it is especially susceptible to issues if allowed to work and labor under loading...and constant speeds (read: highway) during this period. With a bike fully packed for a long trip (heavy!), the bike was probably not really allowed to freely spin through the gears without bogging the engine down.

The KLR's a great bike and very bulletproof, but it has to be run-in correctly for it to be this way.

If I were in your position, and Kawasaki weren't going to resolve this, I'd look at getting a Shnitz 685 kit and put this experience behind you. I'm not sure whether what happened here would be covered by Kawasaki (sorry, but had to say it) warranty repair/replacement. Good luck
Kind of ironic. No one seems to agree on the "proper" break in for a KLR. When I purchased the bike new at the dealer I asked about the break in. They told be that bike didn't really have a break in procedure, just ride it like any other bike. Yet there are others on various forums that insist on various (required) KLR break-in "rituals". That being said, I "broke mine in" for 1000-1200 miles, and yet still have the same problem as TravisT (who doesn't appear to have followed a break in period). So can you really say his misfortune is from failure to follow someones suggested break in period (when Kawasaki says there is none) since we both still ended up with identical oil consumption issues after almost the exact same mileage? My vote is no....
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Old 08-14-2009, 03:36 PM   #42
Hutchie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeremyZ
That's a bummer. I waited for the '09s because I'd read about this on the '08s.

My '09 has been flawless. I keep a wary eye on the oil sight glass, but it hasn't gone down at all. No pinched fuel hose issue. No brittle turn signal mounts.

This seems more like either a manufacturing defect or dealer screw-up than anything else.

One thing to check yourself: Look for the aluminum washer that acts as a gasket between the oil drain plug and bottom of the engine. It is quite possible that fell off when the oil was drained. If the drain plug is put back in tight without that washer, it may not leak at a standstill, but as it gets out, maybe it drips out one drop at a time.

The only reason I mention this is because when I did my first oil change, I was just putting the drain plug in. "Hmm, no washer." I put it in anyway. I thought I'd better just get dirty and go fishing in the dirty oil to make sure there's no washer in there. Sure enough, there was the washer. It fell right off, and I didn't even notice. The bolt never left my hand, so the washer must've been stuck to the bottom of the engine and the oil pouring out took it right with.

It seems to me that over that few miles, at that speed, it could NOT have burned up or "aspirated" all the oil. There would be a lot of smoke, a fouled plug, SOME indicator that something was wrong.

More likely is that it leaked out, either through the drain hole or the oil filter cover if it wasn't tight enough.

Check those two things first, before spreading the word that Kawasaki doesn't know how to make a bike that doesn't leak oil.

Related side story. After about 150,000 miles of re-using the aluminum washer with my oil drain plug on my old '98 Civic. The Civic started leaking oil. At first, I couldn't figure it out. Finally, it dawned on my to check that washer. It was much flatter than it was when new, and it was pulled up onto the threads of the drain bolt, allowing a slow leak. I lost about a quart every two weeks.

Went to the Honda dealer, bought a baggie of the washers for about $3.

This is one example where the home mechanic may do the better job. He is not in a hurry, and is paying attention to detail, because he is the one who gets stranded if he screws up.
+1. This is sound advice. If you're properly torquing the oil drain plug then you will notice that you're washer won't last past 3-4 oil changes. Replace the drain plug washer about every 4-5K miles. Check your oil level after every tank fill-up. Happy trails.
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Old 08-14-2009, 03:37 PM   #43
RoberTx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbetts
There is a discussion on the KLR650.net site .......

http://www.klr650.net/forums/showthr...t=69985&page=3

Starting with post #40.....

The discussion revolves around the shock cooling of the cylinder causing it to go out of round. The theory goes that the improved air flow of the '08- KLR due to a better cowling will cause enough rapid cooling to cool the bottom of the cylinder skirt unevenly causing it to go out of round.

IMO, this fits the facts perfectly. Most bikes were at speed when they developed oil problems meaning they had max load and max cooling. The KLR radiator set up can cause the temp needle to visibly move through half it's range under these conditions.

KHI needs to get on this and investigate it immediately, IMO.
Oh bullshit, the bike was just overloaded I bet.
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Old 08-14-2009, 03:47 PM   #44
Boon Booni
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karlonz
The KLR, in particular, requires careful running-in. ...
The KLR's a great bike and very bulletproof, but it has to be run-in correctly for it to be this way.,,,
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoberTx
Oh bullshit, the bike was just overloaded I bet.

Some people just can't put the Koolaid down.
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Old 08-14-2009, 04:09 PM   #45
hobbner
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You bought a new bike, and left for the trip with only 84 miles on the odometer?

If i were you i would bury this post into the deep sea as this is the kind of evidence that would destroy your case in court. I am amazed no one has raised a fuss about this.

You can not take any new engine and just roll it down the high way on an extended trip, it needs to be broke in properly short drives with varying speeds and distances. The engine needs to heat up, and completely cool down multiple times. Engines are not factory broken in...EVER

I dont care what your driving from sports cars motorboats or motorcycles you have GOT TO BREAK IT IN. The owners manual for the KLR will probably have a huge section on engine break in guidelines.

Your valves and piston rings never had a chance to seat. Add the stress of a long distance ride, heavily loaded and pop goes the motorbike.
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hobbner screwed with this post 08-14-2009 at 04:16 PM
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