ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-31-2009, 10:03 AM   #91
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


I rode around Mt. San Pedro, passed this guy who was feeding his cows... in his front yard. I turned the bike around and watched him walk among his herd- complete with a big black black bull- and thought to myself, "this is a fella whom I should respect."

Did I mention that they're longhorns?

Guy's name is Richard, and he's from Texas, and he keeps this herd on about ten acres. I asked, and he told me that it takes fifty acres to feed a mother-calf unit in this part of New Mexico. I wonder how many pounds of feed he goes through a week. He got most of his herd form Springer, NM a year or so ago.

NM 336
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:05 AM   #92
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


You should have seen him with his Great Pyranees dog- sweet as all get out. She's there to handle the coyotes.

He invited me in to feed the cows. He let me in the gate and we walked towards the garage where he stores his feed. The cows immediately started lowin- they knew it was food time.

Richard handed me a handful of Cow Chow (tm) and before I knew it I was surrounded by steer. I can't say that being surrounded by big-ass cows being for handouts is a comfortable feeling- especially when the bull starts tossing his head to rid himself of flies.

I was pleased I stopped. Richard was incredibly generous with his time.
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:06 AM   #93
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


Somewhere along the way, I blew out my visor. This caused much consternation for the rest of the trip.

John and I messed around with old Shoei parts for a crappy fix, but it wasn't working too well and I removed all the mis-matched parts.

I ended up buying another pair of eyeglass shields, and had to use a hankie to cover my face from bug strikes and from the sun.

The hankie/shield combo made it a drag to remove the helmet.

I-25N
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:13 AM   #94
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796
I'm really glad Mr. Dunbar let me crash at his homestead for a couple of nights- I got to see more of this fantastic part of the country that I'd never before seen.

I ran East on I-25, noticing how the mountains dropped away and how one faces plains so close to Albuquerque. The day I left it was cloudy, stormy in the east. As I got farther east, I saw the lightning and thunder- I could really consider it a good pathetic fallacy with my internal environment.

I hated the long straight slab, so I turned left on NM 3, which took me through the lovely Las Vegas Valley. I passed wineries, punched through more rain, clouds, and lightning (!) (yikes!), sand-covered roads... but it was a nice leg.

Made it to I-25, headed north.
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:17 AM   #95
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


I-25 was a great ride for me- big, expansive views, light traffic, cool stuff to look at. If I had to drive it from Colorado all the time, though, I'm sure I'd go nuts.

I did end up here in NE New Mexico at this old fort. S'help me, I can't think of the name of the place, but it was bee-yoo-tee-ful. Quiet, peaceful, still, and great smelling.

I took an excursion to see Fort Union National Monument, just to breathe in more high prairie air.
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:17 AM   #96
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


Another shot of the upper prairie at the fort.
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:18 AM   #97
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796
Driving out the gate at 6:30pm, I came across this:

baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:19 AM   #98
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:19 AM   #99
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


I-25N
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:27 PM   #100
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796
Team Roping!



I came across a team roping event- I had to pull over and investigate.

These guys were the real deal- raw-boned, laconic, bowlegged- I felt kinda like a big-city sissy next to these guys.
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:28 PM   #101
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796
From Wikipedia:

Team roping also known as heading and heeling is a rodeo event that features a steer (typically a Corriente) and two mounted cowboys or cowgirls. The first roper is referred to as the "header," the person who ropes the front of the steer, usually around the horns; the second is the "heeler," who ropes the steer by its hind feet. Team roping is the only rodeo event where men and women compete equally together in professionally-sanctioned competition, in both single gender or mixed gender teams.

The steers are moved through a series of narrow runways from a holding corral and lined up to enter a chute with spring loaded doors. One steer at a time is loaded into the chute. On each side of the chute is an area called the box. The header is on one side (usually the left, for a right-handed header) whose job is to rope the steer around the horns, or neck, then turn the steer so its hind legs can be roped by the heeler, who starts from the box on the other side of the chute. A taut rope, called the barrier, runs in front of the header and is fastened to an easily released rope on the neck of the steer of a designated length, used to ensure that the steer gets a head start. An electronic barrier, consisting of an electric eye connected to a timing device, is often used in place of the barrier rope.

When the header is ready, he or she calls for the steer and an assistant pulls or trips a lever, opening the chute doors. The freed steer breaks out running. When the steer reaches the end of the rope, the barrier releases. The header must rope the steer with one of three legal catches: clean horn catch (around both horns), a neck catch (around the neck) or a half-head catch (around the neck and one horn). The header then takes a dally, that is a couple of wraps of the rope around the horn of the saddle. Speed is important and some have lost fingers in this event. Once the header has made the dally, he will turn his horse, usually to the left, and the steer will follow, still running.

The heeler waits until the header has turned the steer. When he or she has a clear way, he throws a loop of rope under the running steer's hind legs and catches them. As soon as the heeler also dallies tight, the header turn his horse to directly face the steer and heeler. Both horses back up slightly to stretch out the steer's hind legs, immobilizing the animal. As soon as the steer is stretched out, an official waves a flag and the time is taken. The steer is released and trots off. There is a 5 second penalty for roping only one hind leg and a 10 second penalty for breaking the barrier.

A successful professional-level team takes between 4 and 12 seconds to stretch the steer, depending on the length of the arena. At lower levels, a team may take longer, particularly if the heeler misses the first throw and has to try again.

baldwithglasses screwed with this post 09-01-2009 at 01:47 AM
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2009, 10:31 PM   #102
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796




baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 09:05 PM   #103
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


Spent the night at The Colt Motel in Raton, NM- lots of neon, which is important if you're on the Sante Fe Trail (a north-south version of Route 66). It was cheap, kinda kitschy, clean.

Some Huevos Rancheros in the morning, fueled up, and rolled out.

In this photo, I'm on the pass that divides New Mexiico from Colorado. In the distance, fourteeners.

I-25N to Trinidad.
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 09:07 PM   #104
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


Har! I yam Funny! See the bike sign? See the bike on the bike? Har! Get it? Get it? Har!

This here's right around the actual CO-NM state line.

I-25N



baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 09:17 PM   #105
baldwithglasses OP
Godspeed, Robert
 
baldwithglasses's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Location: East Atlanta Village, Atlanta, Georgia
Oddometer: 796


Fisher's Peak, backside view, US 160E, Colorado, outside Trinidad CO.

Not having a proper visor sucked. I was getting tired and irritated every time I stopped to eat or drink, and had to take off glasses, take off helmet, take out earplugs, take off bug-smashed bandanna, do stuff like eat or drink, put on bandanna, put in earplugs, put on helmet, put on glasses.

I quit taking photos for a bit.
baldwithglasses is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014