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View Results: I have been to the county of Fuckshire, it was ...
Nice? 29 13.18%
Nasty? 30 13.64%
Nasty but nice? 161 73.18%
Voters: 220. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-14-2012, 06:02 AM   #2311
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Correction

The 2 brown wires come out of the tail that holds the plug for the fuel tank, i.e. fuel pump & ballcock fuel level indicator. Just thought I'd mention it :-)
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Old 01-14-2012, 07:43 AM   #2312
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Didn't 'win' the clutch unit, which went for £12.50, but then in all reality the point is moot as bankruptcy looms, or more precisely a Debt Relief Order...
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Old 01-14-2012, 12:18 PM   #2313
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How do you stand up a lowside? Why, run over your own foot of course...

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planktonnn screwed with this post 05-23-2013 at 05:51 AM
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Old 01-14-2012, 01:20 PM   #2314
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Trouble is the cylinders get in the way
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Old 01-14-2012, 03:55 PM   #2315
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Originally Posted by Dirtyboydeadly View Post
Trouble is the cylinders get in the way
Ah, but I've told you the answer to that one, skateboards tied to the rocker covers
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:30 AM   #2316
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Provisional 2012 MotoGP entry list -

1 CASEY STONER AUS - HONDA TEAM, HONDA
4 ANDREA DOVIZIOSO ITA - YAMAHA TECH 3, YAMAHA
5 COLIN EDWARDS USA - FORWARD RACING, SUTER*
6 STEFAN BRADL GER - LCR HONDA MotoGP, HONDA
8 HECTOR BARBERA SPA - PRAMAC RACING TEAM, DUCATI
9 DANILO PETRUCCI ITA - IODA RACING PROJECT, IODA*
11 BEN SPIES USA - YAMAHA FACTORY RACING, YAMAHA
13 ANTHONY WEST AUS - SPEED MASTER, ART*
14 RANDY DE PUNIET FRA - ASPAR TEAM MotoGP, ART*
17 KAREL ABRAHAM CZE - CARDION AB MOTORACING, DUCATI
19 ALVARO BAUTISTA SPA - HONDA GRESINI, HONDA
20 ALEIX ESPARGARO SPA - ASPAR TEAM MotoGP, ART*
22 IVAN SILVA SPA - BQR, BQR-FTR*
26 DANI PEDROSA SPA - HONDA TEAM, HONDA
35 CAL CRUTCHLOW GBR - YAMAHA TECH 3, YAMAHA
46 VALENTINO ROSSI ITA - DUCATI TEAM, DUCATI
51 MICHELE PIRRO ITA - HONDA GRESINI, FTR*
68 YONNY HERNANDEZ COL - BQR, BQR-FTR*
69 NICKY HAYDEN USA - DUCATI TEAM, DUCATI
77 JAMES ELLISON GBR - PAUL BIRD RACING, ART*
99 JORGE LORENZO SPA - YAMAHA FACTORY RACING, YAMAHA

*Claiming Rules Teams
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:52 AM   #2317
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Dont forget me on this
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Old 01-16-2012, 12:56 PM   #2318
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Laugh Addendum

Ah, sorry -

101 MR & MRS DB DEADLY GBR - BOD/G SIDECAR RACING, UTTERSHITE*

* Imaginary teams

Personally I'll be rooting for Colin on the Beemer engined Suter number 3 amongst the claiming rules teams, with a second/third pair of fingers crossed for Ellison & Crutchlow, but best of luck with your world championship campaign DBD

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Old 01-16-2012, 02:00 PM   #2319
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Originally Posted by Dirtyboydeadly View Post
Dont forget me on this
Maybe you'd be better off entering one of these?

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Old 01-16-2012, 02:58 PM   #2320
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Trouble is the cylinders get in the way
Tried to ride out a low-side on a '77 R100RS (sans fairing) once...

Things looked promising at first... Still in the proper lane heading more or less in the proper direction and figured "If I can just scrub off a bit of speed I might be able stand it back up... "

That's when I high-sided.

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Old 01-16-2012, 03:18 PM   #2321
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That looks a lot like the old Ecomobiles.


Quote:
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Maybe you'd be better off entering one of these?

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Old 01-16-2012, 03:28 PM   #2322
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That's when I high-sided.
Yeah, it seems like running over his own foot was all that stopped a hi-side. Can't say I'd recommend that, or even manage to do it on purpose

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That looks a lot like the old Ecomobiles.
I'd like to see either without the bodywork. I'm sure a search would throw up a pic somewhere but here in the Former United Commonwealth Kingdom it's time for sleep, and I'm pretty sure that if I start pic hunting right now I'll get dragged into something interesting and be up all night
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Old 01-17-2012, 04:24 PM   #2323
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Ah, perfect, I'll take it...

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Old 01-17-2012, 06:57 PM   #2324
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Thumb Morning reads...

Thinkers Dip - A great selection of 27 really readable downloadable digital books in a fantastically functional & highly innovative electronic reader, all at a special offer price equivalent to the cost of one paperback, only at http://digitalhardbacks.com/ I'm reading Gibbons Decline & Fall now, and I have to say that for ease of use & comfort of reading these are the finest digital readables available

*****

And in bike related reading - Airheads in the Dakar, R100GS at Motorcycle Classics & Cycle World on the birth of the GS

Pictured Herbert Schek on his R75/5 in 1971 -



And BMW Boxer Enduros on a training day in Wuppertal / Germany -


And from the BMW/GS USA page on Facebook, reproduced here for those that don't Fb -

A brief history of the legendary GS
by BMWGS on Tuesday, 21 September 2010 at 20:30

At Avignon, in September 1980, BMW presented the R 80 G/S to the press. At the time, off-road motorcycles were rarely much bigger than middleweight capacity and clearly defined in their role. BMW’s radical machine forced the birth of a versatile new genre – the R 80 G/S could tackle anything from urban and long-distance riding to off-road enduros. Three decades later, the GS has been much copied and big all-terrain machines have created one of motorcycling’s most popular classes. BMW Motorrad pays homage to this iconic model series…

The BMW G/S model was conceived in 1978 during a period of declining sales, following nearly a decade of growth. On 1 January 1979, a new management team aimed put the BMW motorcycle business back on track. The first model presented to them by the development department, was a large-capacity off-road prototype.
The prototype was built without a formal development brief and was immediately used by the test department to accompany the works team in cross-country motor sport events.



A cross-country tradition
Cross-country racing had become familiar territory to BMW. In the Twenties and Thirties the company had been successful in six-day events, and in the Fifties and Sixties BMW won a series of titles. From 1970 to 1972 Herbert Schek claimed three cross-country championships on a modified BMW R 75/5 road bike. In 1978, the rules again allowed 4-stroke motorcycles to compete in championship events. Laszlo Peres from the BMW test department came second in the German Championship on a self-built 800cc machine that weighed only 142kg.

Peres’ success created an appetite for more and in 1979 BMW established a works team to compete officially in cross-country competitions. The reward for this commitment was the German Championship – won by Richard Schalber in 1979 and Werner Schütz in 1980. In addition, Rolf Witthöft won the European Championship, also in 1980.

Building a successful sports model is one thing, developing an economically viable production machine presents a far-reaching challenge. The new machine had to be suitable for everyday use and the selling price had to be competitive.

Seeking a market position
A concept gradually emerged of a machine with all-terrain capability, combined with high performance and on-road ride comfort. A careful market study of enduro riding revealed that a mere two per cent of kilometres ridden were across really difficult terrain; and 98 per cent were on normal roads, unsurfaced tracks or narrow paths. The idea of a comfortable, large-capacity enduro/street machine was born. Its concept was reflected in the G/S model designation – G for Gelände (terrain) and S for Strasse (road). It created a new market and a demand that has so far proved virtually inexhaustible.

Technically sophisticated rear-wheel drive
BMW management gave the go-ahead for series production and Rüdiger Gutsche, head of chassis development, was put in charge of the project. The focus of development was on new single-arm rear wheel suspension. This feature was new technical territory and the question was whether such a design would be able to withstand heavy stress.

Initial trials were promising and in January 1980 BMW press spokesman Kalli Hufstadt and journalist Hans Peter Leicht set off on two pre-production machines for a 2,000-kilometre ride through Ecuador. During the trip the motorcycles had to combat extreme weather and atrocious road conditions but the men and their machines emerged with no more than a few slight injuries. The development work of the BMW engineers had paid off and the backroom staff were able to start fine-tuning the new, and now proven, G/S machine.

The press impressed
By 1 September 1980 everything was ready. The BMW R 80 G/S was introduced to the international press in the French city of Avignon. Less than 21 months had elapsed since the project was launched and those involved at BMW were anxious to see the reaction. With a dry weight of just 167kg, it was the lightest 800cc motorcycle available. It had a ground clearance of 218mm – and its spring travel of 200mm at the front and 170mm at the rear delivered off-road qualities to satisfy most riders.

The enthusiasm among journalists at the launch of the new motorcycle was universal. One magazine described it with tongue in cheek as ‘the best road motorcycle from BMW’, so impressed were they by its handling qualities. A summary of all the G/S test rides indicated that the new BMW concept had produced ‘A motorcycle for all terrain’. The 800cc BMW R 80 G/S was not only the largest capacity of any enduro machine with road capability, but with a maximum speed of 168km/h it was by far the fastest.

Customers go for the G/S
On 19 September, when it was shown to the public at the IFMA (international motorcycle show) there was a huge crowd around the BMW stand. The public were anxious to see the ‘Bavarian all-rounder’, which had already received so many compliments in the press. Enthusiasm on the stand was converted into orders and by the end of 1981 a total of 6,631 machines – more than twice the number originally planned – had left the workshops in Berlin. One in every five BMW motorcycles sold was a G/S. It meant that the enduro tourer was making a decisive contribution to BMW’s steadily rising sales figures – and to this day, 30 years after the launch – the market segment has maintained its enormous importance for BMW.



Success in the desert
BMW set its sights on the toughest and most prestigious off-road event in the world, the Paris-Dakar Rally. First staged in 1979, the race distance was 9,500km – and a mere 30 per cent of the route was on surfaced roads. In 1979 Fenouil, the only BMW rider, retired with a technical fault. In 1980, Hubert Auriol signed on as the second BMW France rider alongside Fenouil and was in the lead after 11 stages, but in the 12th he was disqualified for unauthorised assistance. By finishing in fifth, Fenouil earned a succès d’estime.

The following year BMW went to the start with three motorcycles prepared by HPN. Auriol was the first to reach Dakar and he was to repeat BMW’s overall victory in 1983. In 1984 and 1985 the Belgian Gaston Rahier also won the Paris-Dakar. With four victories in the Paris-Dakar, BMW had provided impressive proof of the off-road potential of the G/S.

Riding the G/S into the distance
While BMW offered a substantial range of accessories for the G/S, a second market established itself, specifically designed to meet the demands of long-distance travel. In 1984 BMW brought out a special ‘Paris-Dakar’ model. A 32-litre tank with the striking Paris-Dakar logo, a single seat and generous luggage rack gave it the appearance of a competition machine.

The G/S sold supremely well and success attracted not only admirers, but also imitators. It was clear that BMW could not rest on its laurels and would have to defend its position as market leader.

The successors
The result of further development was presented to the public for the first time in Florence on 24 August 1987. The successor models were called the R 80 GS and R 100 GS – the oblique stroke in the designation had been dropped. With the 1000cc R 100 GS, BMW was once again able to offer the largest engine enduro machine on the market. However, it was not the engine – already sufficiently well known from the road models – that attracted attention. Once again it was the rear suspension and frame that had seen substantial modifications.

In addition to the ‘Paralever’ – as the new suspension arm was named – there were numerous detail improvements incorporated in the new GS. For example, the frame and rear end were given additional reinforcement and a new Marzocchi telescopic fork was fitted to the front wheel. The front brake disc was enlarged and a larger Brembo brake calliper fitted. The wheels were of the new cross-spoke type and enabled the use of tubeless tyres. The tank capacity was increased to 26 litres and the longer and wider saddle promised more comfort – as did a small windscreen, which was introduced as standard on the R 100 GS and available as an accessory for the R 80 GS.

The entry-level model
Alongside the two big machines, and specifically for the German market, BMW introduced a 27bhp entry-level model, the R 65 GS. However, the bike was only granted a brief production life. In three years no more than 1,727 units had been sold and the R 65 GS was removed from the range in 1990. A 10th birthday upgrade In 1990, on the 10th anniversary of the GS series, extensively redesigned versions of the R 80 GS and R 100 GS were presented at IFMA in Cologne. The basic models now had a fixed cockpit fairing with external tubular frame. Also new was an adjustable wind deflector and suspension strut, a rectangular headlamp, and instruments borrowed from the K series.

A new dimension
The R 1100 GS made its debut at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September 1993. With its audacious styling and impressive size – compared with the R 100 GS – the new model was 65mm higher and kerb weight had increased by 23kg. The R 1100 GS hit the enduro market like a bombshell. Many observers openly expressed doubts as to whether a motorcycle of such dimensions would be at all suitable for adventure touring. But public demand for the new ‘Über-Enduro’ was enormous – by the end of 1994, the production line at BMW’s Spandau plant had despatched 9,500 units.

The Telelever
At high speeds, the height and aerodynamics of the R 1100 GS might have made it difficult to ride. The problem was solved by a chassis design taken from the R 1100 RS where the frame had been constructed in three sections – with the engine and gearbox housing forming a single, stressed unit. The rear wheel was fitted with an improved Paralever single swing-arm and the front with BMW’s new Telelever. The latter, which had also been introduced a year previously on the R 1100 RS, was a combination of telescopic fork and a leading link between the bridge of the fork and the frame. In conjunction with an anti-dive feature this technical solution guaranteed outstanding responsiveness and a high degree of rigidity, thereby preventing a hardening of the suspension when the brakes were applied.

Farewell to the twin-valve boxer
The end of the air-cooled, twin-cylinder horizontally-opposed engine was imminent. This engine design, which since 1923 had been inseparably linked with BMW motorcycles, was no longer able to meet the severe restrictions on noise and exhaust emissions. Thus at IFMA in 1994, BMW introduced a Classic Edition of the successful twin-valve engine. The GS Special – in elegant black with silver transfers – continued to be manufactured until January 1996. At that point, the era of BMW’s twin-valve enduro models appeared to have finally come to an end.

Despite this, BMW went back to work and produced the R 80 GS Basic. With its 19.5-litre tank and white paintwork it was outwardly reminiscent of the original G/S of 1980, albeit fitted with second generation Paralever technology. In a few months over 3,000 units had left the Berlin factory. The last R 80 GS Basic and thus the last BMW twin-valve boxer engine machines came off the line on 19 December 1996.

In September 1998, at INTERMOT in Munich, the R 850 GS was launched as the little brother to the 1100. The engine (from the R 850 R Roadster) was introduced in 1994 and developed 70bhp (52kW) but was also available in a downgraded 34bhp version. The R 850 GS was only produced for three years and in 2000 a single-cylinder model, the F 650 GS, replaced it.

Historic triumph in the desert
In 1998 BMW celebrated a comeback in cross-country sport when, after a gap of 13 years, it again entered a works team in the Paris-Dakar Rally. This time, the four-man team was not riding big boxer machines but single-cylinder motorcycles based on the F 650 GS. Their expectations were deliberately modest and the main objective was to finish the course. Results proved disappointing and a mediocre 35th place and three retirements were added to the record.

The major competition the following year came from Austria: 75 riders, nine of them in the works team, were riding KTMs. No less than 12 trucks provided servicing facilities. However, the small BMW team held their own against superior forces. Richard Sainct, who had only joined the team in 1999, won the motorcycle category, repeating the success of Auriol and Rahier in the 1980s, to give BMW its fifth victory in the event. The fact that all four BMW starters completed the course was proof of the reliability of the single-cylinder enduro bike – and the excellence of the riders.

In 2000, BMW entered six motorcycles. In addition to four single-cylinder models there were once again two boxers on the starting line. The two R 900 RRs had been built by HPN and their high-revving 900cc power unit developed 90bhp at 8,200rpm. BMW once again celebrated a historic triumph in the Dakar when Richard Sainct repeated his success and BMW also took 2nd, 3rd and 4th places. Between the three single-cylinder models, Jimmy Lewis had ridden his boxer into third position.

The F 650 GS
When BMW introduced the F 650 GS in January 2000, under the fairing was a completely reworked F 650 Funduro. For the first time on any single-cylinder motorcycle BMW had fitted digital electronics to control the ignition and fuel injection. The F 650 GS was also the first single-cylinder motorcycle to employ a three-way catalyst as standard. This meant that BMW was once again a pioneer in environmental protection and in 2000 was the only manufacturer whose entire range was fitted with the most effective form of exhaust gas cleaning.

The F 650 GS was introduced in two variants to include a F 650 Dakar model for more intensive off-road use. The concept of the ‘small’ enduro caught on quickly and by the end of 2000 BMW had manufactured over 18,000 F 650 GS machines.

Model development with the boxer GS
After six years, and over 40,000 sales, the R 1100 GS was replaced by the R 1150 GS. Output was increased by 5bhp between 3,000 and 6,500rpm and torque was consistently in excess of 90Nm, which gave the R 1150 GS superior acceleration in all riding situations. The chassis and frame were subject to numerous detailed modifications, beginning with the improved Telelever fork, through a shorter Paralever suspension arm, to an optimised rear-end frame. In addition there was a reworking of the design, which set the R 1150 GS apart from its predecessors in terms of appearance. With the R 1150 GS, BMW asserted its lead in big enduro tourers and was able to stay ahead of competitors who were also crowding into the lucrative market segment.

The ultimate GS for adventure and global touring
For global travellers BMW brought out a new model in the spring of 2002, which was named the R 1150 GS Adventure. In doing so, BMW not only offered a comprehensive range of special equipment and accessories but also modified the standard GS features. Suspension play was enlarged by 20mm on each wheel to 210mm at the front and 220mm at the rear. On the rear wheel a Showa suspension strut with travel-dependent damping was used. The front wheel was fitted with the EVO brake and as an option BMW offered Integral ABS anti-lock braking system.

Further modifications were principally designed to enhance the comfort of the rider; for example, the windscreen and front mudguard were lengthened and widened. This gave better protection from wind, weather, spray and mud. Hand protection and protection from handlebar jolting were standard features and under-the-engine protection was also strengthened. In place of the 22-litre fuel tank, customers could opt for a 30-litre tank. Adequate stowage space was provided by a set of aluminium cases specially designed for the Adventure – the two side cases and a top box provided 105 litres of space. There was even a large cylinder protection bracket, protective grille for the headlamp, and a fog lamp also with protective grille.

With these special accessories BMW could once again claim to be a system provider and offer the globetrotting community ‘one-stop shopping’ as a complete solution.

A new benchmark – the R 1200 GS
In summer 2004, BMW presented a new generation of its classic enduro model. Rather than facelift the existing R 1150 GS, the company decided to create a new motorcycle, the R 1200 GS, which would offer all the advantages of the predecessor models but in a far more dynamic form.

The new model was an industry surprise and weighed only 199kg dry – a reduction of 30kg compared with the R 1150 GS. However, the low weight was not achieved through compromise. On the contrary, the R 1200 GS surpassed its famous predecessor in every respect and set new standards of agility, handling and reliability. With a capacity of 1200cc the boxer engine was the largest ever fitted in an enduro machine. With an output of 100bhp (74kW) and a maximum torque of 115Nm, the GS guaranteed a supreme power curve and sufficient pulling power at all engine speeds – on or off-road. Thanks to the first-time use of a counterbalanced crankshaft in a boxer, the engine generated less vibration than its predecessors despite being larger in cylinder capacity.

An important factor for long-distance travellers was that the engine, although tuned for super-grade unleaded petrol, would happily run on normal fuel without any manual adjustment. Fuel consumption was been improved by eight per cent compared with earlier models, and power output and torque were raised by nearly 18 per cent.

The R 1200 GS had an unmistakable appearance and every detail of the new bike underwent modification and weight optimisation. All these improvements were also featured just over a year later on the BMW R 1200 GS Adventure, which now replaced the BMW R 1150 Adventure. With all this going for it, the R 1200 GS couldn’t fail to be a success, and after just three years, sales of the two large BMW enduros had already topped the 100,000 mark.

HP2 Enduro
For many boxer fans, this was a dream come true. Never before had a boxer model been this athletic and had such radical off-road capabilities. There had already been plans for a radical off-road boxer years before, but not until the lightweight R 1200 GS was a suitable technical basis available for developing such a machine.

The engineers had already gained experience with the tubular space frame from working with the R 900 RR, while for the engine and driveline they were able to draw on the R 1200 GS. The air spring strut and TDD telescopic fork gave the bike competitive speed on the worst imaginable off-road trails. Here the HP2 Enduro went way beyond all previous GS models. The handling, heavily influenced by the 21-inch front wheel and the light weight of the bike, was unrivalled too. But obviously such a machine could neither be cheap nor meet a wide spectrum of wants and needs. The production run was consequently limited to 2005 and 2006.

F models continue to be as popular as ever
In 2008, the F 650 GS and its sister model the F 650 Dakar, were replaced by a brand new F 800 GS twin-cylinder model. The new models are powered by a parallel twin-cylinder engine taken from the F 800 S and F 800 ST street models, which were launched in 2006.

The F 800 GS enduro is not only equipped with the same engine as the 800 series street machines but also with the same tubular space frame. With a 21-inch front wheel, large ground clearance and more than 200 millimetres of spring travel, it can take on any type of terrain, while on the road its agile, 85hp engine powers it vigorously up to the 200km/h mark.

However, with the parallel twin-cylinder engine, liquid cooling and chain drive to the rear wheel, this was a completely different technical concept from that of the tried-and-tested boxer models. The particular strengths of the twin-cylinder 800 model are its compact and robust design, outstanding fuel economy and agile performance.

In 2008, the company then brought out a new version of the F 650 GS. In fact, the displacement of this model – 798cc – was the same as that of the F 800 GS. The only difference was that it was a little more softly tuned than in the F 800 GS version, making it more suitable for less experienced riders or those with a more leisurely riding style. The single-cylinder F 650 GS predecessor is still in production in Brazil, but only for specific markets.

The GS models just keep getting better
In 2007 the R 1200 GS underwent a facelift that introduced a large number of detail improvements. It became more agile with the incorporation of the six-speed transmission from the HP2 Sport street bike. The GS now shared its pistons and camshaft with the R 1200 R and RT, raising maximum output to 105hp at 7,500rpm. Seat and handlebar comfort was further improved and visually, the revised GS can be identified by the striking light-alloy side covers on the fuel tank and LED rear light.



Modernised yet again: the GS at 30
To mark its 30th birthday, the evergreen GS boxer engine was given a sporty makeover, with the 2010 models inheriting the high-tech cylinder heads of the meteoric HP2 Sport. Since an all-out focus on maximum power would have conflicted with the versatility that continues to be the hallmark of the boxer engine, the increase in output is relatively moderate, to 110hp at 7,750rpm. A more important priority was to ensure a further increase in torque over a wide rpm range. The increased compression ratio allows the GS to achieve outstanding fuel efficiency.

The GS and its sister model, the Adventure, have for many years been not only the most popular BMW motorcycles, but in some countries the best-selling motorcycles overall. Clearly, the fathers of the original R 80 G/S had the right instinct when they went against the trend and opted instead to create an all-rounder with strong touring qualities.

Thirty years have passed since the launch of the BMW R 80 G/S. In three decades that segment of the world market has grown tremendously and BMW, as a pioneer with each new model, has set the standard for a harmonious synthesis of off-road and on-road qualities. BMW still represents the benchmark in this market segment today. Indeed, more than 500,000 customers around the world can vouch for the talents of the GS models and their incomparable boxer engine.

Thanks to this range of models and a pride in 30 years of achievement, BMW Motorrad can look with optimism at the future of the enduro market.
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Old 01-20-2012, 01:43 PM   #2325
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"He who lives to see two or three generations is like a man who sits some time in the conjurer's booth at a fair, and witnesses the performance twice or thrice in succession. The tricks were meant to be seen only once; and when they are no longer a novelty and cease to deceive, their effect is gone."

Audio book @ http://librivox.org/studies-in-pessimism-by-arthur-schopenhauer/
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