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Old 08-20-2004, 05:06 AM   #61
Ian640 OP
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Carlos,

> t'was Portugal - Mauritania and return
Which piste(s)? I went Nouadhibou to Nouackhott in 01. Since this, apparently is almost sealed, now thinking of Nouadhibou to Choum and Atar etc. next to the railway track.

> notice the sign
Voila...

Cheers.
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Old 08-20-2004, 06:29 AM   #62
meat popsicle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack
As to the Rallye oil cooler, that thing looks oversized for non-race liquid cooled bike. Overcooled oil is not a good thing either. The LC4 oil resevoir is designed to act as an oil cooler, so if an additional oil cooler was added it would need a thermostat, and IMHO you would want something small. First step would be to add a Sommer supplied oil temp gauge to see what it is running at. (I suspect the Monomaniacs, KTMax, etc. already have a really good idea of what we are discussing, if someone wants to persue this.) There is also a cooler available for Duke IIs and SMCs though the location is a bit low for dirt use. I live in Texas, and have been watching the temp tabs I installed on my bike, at this point I am not the least bit worried. Though I am a bit concerned about my motor fragging as the miles build, but not in a matter related to oil. Sorry for the diatribe.
Wow, slow down fellas I can't keep up! Mack, never appologize for your diatribes - they help. Do you think that the oil cooler might keep the oil too cool? I will let Happe and you settle this as you are over my head fer sure. I was asking b/c it seems that alot of people overheat on-road, and there is always this fellas original question about oil longevitity (on topic!!!!). PS - I want that Sommer oil temp dipstick...

No you watch it Creeper - that is what I meant. Just: (But my bike-O-chondriac tendencies might constitute wankerness...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happe
Sorry if it sounds like but I don't think it is a good idea straight away.
If you plan to make a tour through wide and hot deserts and you know that the usual oil change intervals will not fit in here, go for a bigger reservoir.
Normally you don't need to do anything, but maybe it gives you a bit more confidence.
I am talking of a tour not a Rally Raid or any kind of competition.
It is pretty easy to reach an oil temperature of 120-130deg. C.
But to reach more than 150 deg C. is quite a hard job. Even on competitions like the "Le touqet" êt is unusual.
I have a lot of buddies riding the African deserts every year. The lub system was never an issue. The biggest Problem is the Airbox and the possibility of getting Sand into the engine. So spend more time in preparing the airbox and air filters than thinking of extra oil gadgets.
Also be prepared for the bad fuel down there. Try to fit the CDI from the '03 models. Or if you can get, the older 80 octane CDI.
Thanks Happe! More gems for us nOObs! (Flanny ) So my '03 has an adjustable CDI??? News to me... "simple plug disconnect"??? I'll do a little searching.

Hey Buckster, Creeper may like those "screaming for attention" day-glow bikes, but I say you jumped on a year too late. So you can keep the '04.

Creeper (back to you again?), I heard that PD axed the big bikes (i.e. the 950) from the competition, so they will definately have some smaller bike in their works but wouldn't they need to keep runnin with the LC4, even if its just to support the LC4 folks (even out of competition)? Seems like there will be plenty of demand from all us'all for awhile.
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Old 08-20-2004, 07:18 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meat popsicle
Creeper (back to you again?), I heard that PD axed the big bikes (i.e. the 950) from the competition, so they will definately have some smaller bike in their works but wouldn't they need to keep runnin with the LC4, even if its just to support the LC4 folks (even out of competition)? Seems like there will be plenty of demand from all us'all for awhile.
Hi Meat,
Sorry I am not Creeper, but this is maybe interesting for you.
Carlo DeGavardo was riding a 450ccm Lc4 on the last Dakar & Rally D'orient.
And the funny thing is you should be able to buy a conversion Kit for your Lc4 Engine in the near future
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Old 08-20-2004, 07:38 AM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happe
Hi Meat,
Carlo DeGavardo was riding a 450ccm Lc4 on the last Dakar & Rally D'orient.
And the funny thing is you should be able to buy a conversion Kit for your Lc4 Engine in the near future
Spent a weekend trail riding a 400LC4 a few years back. Subjective I know, but I found it a dream to ride on the tighter off road going, but I missed the extra grunt of the 640.

Maybe this 450cc kit will offer a nice compromise. And, staying (almost) on topic, greater engine longevity?
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Old 08-20-2004, 07:45 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian640
Spent a weekend trail riding a 400LC4 a few years back. Subjective I know, but I found it a dream to ride on the tighter off road going, but I missed the extra grunt of the 640.

Maybe this 450cc kit will offer a nice compromise. And, staying (almost) on topic, greater engine longevity?
De Gavardo won all the technical sections on the Rally D'orient but Jean Brucy on the 660 all section where power was required.
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Old 08-20-2004, 07:54 AM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckster
Your shitting me, right?
Why.... yes I am actually.
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Old 08-20-2004, 08:14 AM   #67
Carlos M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian640
Carlos,I went Nouadhibou to Nouackhott in 01. Since this, apparently is almost sealed, now thinking of Nouadhibou to Choum and Atar etc. next to the railway track.
Cheers.
I think this is something like "thread owner hijacks himself!" In April the coast road was far from finished. There are some works going on around Bou Lanouar and the border oficers proclaim that this time the road will finally come through... but I suspect it'll take some years before it'll reach Nouakchott

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian640
Which piste(s)?
Acctually part of it was off-piste :-). See the map here I'll try to finally post a small trip report and I'll let you know when finished.

Cheers,
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Old 08-20-2004, 11:10 AM   #68
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I think we need to get Flanny in on this, I sense he is holding back!

Best improvements and/or preventative maintenance for LC4 longevity???
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Old 08-20-2004, 11:34 AM   #69
meat popsicle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flanny
You guys are funny...four pages...wow...



I don't think Flanny is interested. Bummer...

What's this business about an adjustable CDI???
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Old 08-20-2004, 12:32 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meat popsicle
What's this business about an adjustable CDI???
The CDI in the '03 & '04 models have two different ignition curves.
One for 95 octane and one for 80 octane. You just have to unplug one cable.
Before this there was a Hardequipment CDI with a 80 octane ignition curve for use with fuel in third world countries.
But if you use the low octane setting or CDI you will lose power, but at least the engine will survive.

cheers

Stefan
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Old 08-20-2004, 04:19 PM   #71
Flanny
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack
I think we need to get Flanny in on this, I sense he is holding back!

Best improvements and/or preventative maintenance for LC4 longevity???
For Longevity most of the stuff you have to do has nothing to do with "add-ons", but rather consistent and regular maintenance:

1) Clean your air filter really often by keeping three filters in a rotation. NO-TOIL makes cleaning a snap. This is the single bigest factor in engine wear -- grit being admitted direcly into the cylinder.

2) Change your oil at about 1000 miles of hard off-road, 2500 miles of regular service. Change oil filters every other oil change. (I also used the Scotts stainless filters...they don't present as much pressure drop in the system, and prevent filter by-pass in cold running conditions). Any good oil will do if you change it often. Also...don't forget that your fork oil wears too...change it after the first 600 miles, and then again every 7000 miles or so)

3) Don't beat your bike up when it's cold... low loads until full operating temps is reached (it's longer than you think...sometimes it can be up to 15 minutes (see point below about oild temp gauge).

4) Take care of your chain. Wash/Brush with Simple Green or citrus de-greaser after a messy ride. Then WD-40 to get the watter off. When it's dry, apply a good lube (90wt Gear Oil in wet conditions, Bel-Ray Super Clean in dusty conditions). Keep it properly tensioned

5) Keep your valves properly adjusted. It's a pain in the ass, but has a big effect on fuel-mileage and on vibes.

6) Wash your bike with low-pressure hose...Power sprayers will get water in behind seals.

7) Keep an eye on your wheel spacers and on your brake pad retention pins...they wear gooves faster than you'd think.

8) Protect the electrical system. The vibes and the dirt really work into the molex connectors and cause the wires to wear through. I cleaned and die-electric greased all connectors and encased pretty much my entire harness in rubber bicycle tubing. Never had a short ever after that.

9) Keep a stock of the common bolts/nuts and replace the ones that eventually get worn (like the fairing bolts, airbox cover bolts etc.)

Pretty much anything else you do (carbs, pipes, cams, air-box mods etc.) will be negative in terms of longevity. A properly jetted stock motor is the best bet for reliability.

As for oil coolers and shit...I agree 100% with Mack. You should know that your oil needs a cooler before you run out and install one-so a temp gauge should be your first priority. Non-thermostatic coolers should only be used in race conditions. You need thermostatic control to deal with colder temps. Until your oil gets up to temp, it will by-pass the filter (too much pressure drop)...when you add an oil cooler without a thermostat the by-pass will stay on longer...that is a bad thing.

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Old 08-20-2004, 05:54 PM   #72
meat popsicle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flanny
For Longevity most of the stuff you have to do has nothing to do with "add-ons", but rather consistent and regular maintenance:

1) Clean your air filter really often by keeping three filters in a rotation. NO-TOIL makes cleaning a snap. This is the single bigest factor in engine wear -- grit being admitted direcly into the cylinder.

2) Change your oil at about 1000 miles of hard off-road, 2500 miles of regular service. Change oil filters every other oil change. (I also used the Scotts stainless filters...they don't present as much pressure drop in the system, and prevent filter by-pass in cold running conditions). Any good oil will do if you change it often. Also...don't forget that your fork oil wears too...change it after the first 600 miles, and then again every 7000 miles or so)

3) Don't beat your bike up when it's cold... low loads until full operating temps is reached (it's longer than you think...sometimes it can be up to 15 minutes (see point below about oild temp gauge).

4) Take care of your chain. Wash/Brush with Simple Green or citrus de-greaser after a messy ride. Then WD-40 to get the watter off. When it's dry, apply a good lube (90wt Gear Oil in wet conditions, Bel-Ray Super Clean in dusty conditions). Keep it properly tensioned

5) Keep your valves properly adjusted. It's a pain in the ass, but has a big effect on fuel-mileage and on vibes.

6) Wash your bike with low-pressure hose...Power sprayers will get water in behind seals.

7) Keep an eye on your wheel spacers and on your brake pad retention pins...they wear gooves faster than you'd think.

8) Protect the electrical system. The vibes and the dirt really work into the molex connectors and cause the wires to wear through. I cleaned and die-electric greased all connectors and encased pretty much my entire harness in rubber bicycle tubing. Never had a short ever after that.

9) Keep a stock of the common bolts/nuts and replace the ones that eventually get worn (like the fairing bolts, airbox cover bolts etc.)

Pretty much anything else you do (carbs, pipes, cams, air-box mods etc.) will be negative in terms of longevity. A properly jetted stock motor is the best bet for reliability.

As for oil coolers and shit...I agree 100% with Mack. You should know that your oil needs a cooler before you run out and install one-so a temp gauge should be your first priority. Non-thermostatic coolers should only be used in race conditions. You need thermostatic control to deal with colder temps. Until your oil gets up to temp, it will by-pass the filter (too much pressure drop)...when you add an oil cooler without a thermostat the by-pass will stay on longer...that is a bad thing.

Single post sticky!?!
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Old 08-21-2004, 04:24 AM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian640
>

How's the double disk in loose off road going?

Cheers.
I spent all day yesterday in pure slime, no grip at all, made me realise how little I use the brakes off road, but I can "feather" the front no problem, on road you can screech the front.
Where are you based UK?
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Old 08-21-2004, 11:56 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckster
I spent all day yesterday in pure slime, no grip at all, made me realise how little I use the brakes off road, but I can "feather" the front no problem, on road you can screech the front.
Where are you based UK?
Thought the double discs may be a bit fierce for the dirt, hence the KTM rally bikes not having them.

Based in the beautiful north, soon the midlands.

I hope you add to the small number of KTM owners at next year's Horizons meeting, a great opportunity to listen to and tell travel tales, talk for hours about adventure bikes/gear and drink beer. Also there's usually a few 'ride outs' on local trails and roads.

If you're looking for something to do at the weekend with your Adventure, I used to compete in long distance trials on mine, but now ride an LC4-E. Here's a link - http://www.themotorcyclingclub.org.uk/ The club's always looking for new members, especially motorcyclists
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Old 08-21-2004, 12:27 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian640
I hope you add to the small number of KTM owners at next year's Horizons meeting, a great opportunity to listen to and tell travel tales, talk for hours about adventure bikes/gear and drink beer. Also there's usually a few 'ride outs' on local trails and roads.

If you're looking for something to do at the weekend with your Adventure, I used to compete in long distance trials on mine, but now ride an LC4-E. Here's a link - http://www.themotorcyclingclub.org.uk/ The club's always looking for new members, especially motorcyclists
That sounds promising.
Are Aliens welcome?

cu
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