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Old 09-03-2009, 06:25 PM   #1
Crush OP
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Jet Metal Lathe Operation?

I recently acquired a Jet 1340 geared metal lathe. The manual that came with it is a scant 19 pages. I have yet to find any more instruction of how the lathe works.

There is a series of pictures in the paperwork telling what each lever does. I cannot get the feed rod/lead screw to engage.

Do any of you have one of these lathes that can explain how to get the lever to engage? It is not frozen or bound up, it just won't engage.

BTW, I have never operated a metal lathe before, and I know a lathe is a dangerous piece of machinery, therefore, I would prefer to be armed with a little knowledge.

Thanks, Dennis
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Old 09-03-2009, 08:41 PM   #2
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Is the lead screw turning when the chuck spins?
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Old 09-03-2009, 09:10 PM   #3
Crush OP
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I did manage to move the lever to the right which engaged the leadscrew, but it will not go to the left to engage the feed rod.

At first it would not engage at all. In order for me to engage the leadscrew, I unplugged the lathe and engaged the power feed and kept rotating and moving things by hand and the lever went to the right, but still won't go left for the feed rod.

I am sure it is operator error. I just want to make sure I know what every lever and setting does before I try to make anything.

Thanks, Dennis
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Old 09-04-2009, 04:29 AM   #4
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This should give you plenty of reading:
Homeshop Machinist

That's a pretty popular lathe, so you should be able to find some more info.

I have an Atlas/Craftsmen from just after WWII. So everything is manual on mine.
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Old 09-04-2009, 05:14 AM   #5
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Laugh

This manual?

http://content.jettools.com/manuals/M-321810.pdf


Yeah, it is pretty lame, but I'm sure the manual for actually using the machine proficiently will cost you $$$$...

Quote:


3.
Leadscrew/Feed Rod Directional Lever


(F, Fig. 13) - located on front of headstock.
Moving the lever up causes carriage travel
toward the tailstock. Moving the lever
down causes carriage travel toward the
headstock. When chuck is spinning in the
forward or counter-clockwise direction.

Do not
move lever while machine is

running.


I could have used one of these the other day. I wanted to turn down 2 aluminum sheaves that were damaged from a belt. But $3500 for the machine compared to $17 for new sheaves.
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Old 09-04-2009, 07:01 AM   #6
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Crush,

Congratulations on your lathe acquisition, and I admire you for wanting to try out machining, that is very cool.

There are some excellent books on amazon.com that are inexpensive and make a good introduction, but I can also recommend this forum:

http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/

The basis of which is small model steam engines, but they have a wealth of knowledge on general machining and workshop practices - a great resource for the newcomer to machine tools. I wouldn't be surprised if someone there can talk you through each piece on your lathe.

That said, I'm off to look at the 1340 now.......

OK, you have two feed mechanisms on that lathe. One is the leadscrew, one is the feed rod. I believe you have a lever on the headstock, which selects either one of these (but never both).

This lever is the second one down I believe. When in one position the leadscrew will turn (the long threaded rod), when in the other position the feed rod will turn (this is the middle rod, running along the bed, between the leadscrew and the bottom rod).

Once you have either of these turning, you then have to engage a separate mechanism to start the saddle feeding down the machine. In the case of the leadscrew, you have to engage the "half nut", which is done with the lever at the rear of the saddle - pointing towards the back of the machine. It should have a diagram showing the half nut clamping on to the leadscrew (or not for the off position).

In the case of the feedrod, there is another leaver on the front of the saddle, pointing outwards, which I believe engages the feedrod.

The leadscrew is used for cutting threads, and the feedrod is basically used for turning diameters / facing parts.

Does any of that make sense? It's a bit tricky to describe. Maybe I can doctor up and image with some arrows to help explain it better. This is assuming I have judged the levers correctly from the crappy pictures I found.

EDIT: Dammit, the pic I am looking at has a different lever arrangement on the headstock to the manual in the link above......the saddle levers are the same though.
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propforward screwed with this post 09-04-2009 at 07:19 AM
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Old 09-04-2009, 02:45 PM   #7
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The quick change gear box controls the feed rate of the carriage and cross slide. The headstock provides the gearing for the spindle (i.e. RPMS). On the apron there should be a clutch, split nut lever, and a carriage/crosslide feed selector lever. You need to do ALOT of reading and get familiar with the machine before you ruin something or hurt yourself. These machines do not have any safeguards built in since most are run by trained operators that KNOW how to use them. So basically, if you don't know what you are doing STOP and learn before you break something.
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Old 09-04-2009, 03:00 PM   #8
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I have a healthy respect for the beast and am fully aware of (most) of the dangers. I've been reading and watching videos for a while now.

My problem was that I could not get the lead screw or the feed rod to engage. I have since discovered that if I turn the lead screw or feed rod by hand back and forth slightly I can get either to engage, I did this with the machine OFF.

I understand the principles of operation of the lathe, but I am making sure I know exactly what each lever etc does before I put a tool anywhere near a work piece, kind of like driving a large 988 loader for the first time, don't get near anything that can be damaged until one is familiar with how it works.

I was actually asking for input for this particular lathe. That being said, I really appreciate everyone's input. I want to be safe rather than sorry.

Thanks for the replies, keep 'em coming.

Dennis
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Old 09-04-2009, 03:36 PM   #9
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Well sounds like you have a sound approach Crush. I would suggest a tech course if possible at a local tech college if you have one. I am quite sure you can get the principles down, but there is a lot to learn in terms of cutting tools and set up, and how these are affected by the material you are trying to cut and so on. Just a thought.
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Old 09-04-2009, 04:27 PM   #10
Crush OP
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I wish there was a place to take a class near me. Next best thing is learning the basics and watch instructional videos.

I'll eventually get it pretty good, it'll just take a little longer this way.

Dennis
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Old 09-05-2009, 03:44 AM   #11
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we're far away from ea other, but phonecalls are cheap and easier, quicker than posting. i machine for a living, you can pm, for a phone# anytime or send yours, if any questions glad to help. 15 min spent yakking with an inmate is time well spent imho.
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Old 09-05-2009, 07:51 AM   #12
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Quick formula for calculating rpms:

SFPM X 12" / Diameter of workpiece X 3.14

SFPM = surface feet per minute

Get DeGarmo's Materials & Processes in Manufacturing (tenth edition). It's a great book and it covers lathes, tools, materials, mills and pretty much everything you can think of. It's a great resource. And as far as getting the feed rod and lead screw to engage, it's just like shifting a motorcycle when it's turned off and stopped (sometimes it will need the countershaft to be rotated a bit for the gears to engage properly). Same with the carriage and crosslide feed selector lever, if you find that it wont engage properly just turn the dials a bit while shifting the lever and it should engage.

I'm jelaous, I wish I had my own jet lathe!
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Old 09-05-2009, 07:56 AM   #13
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Dennis,

Don't know what kind of an area you live in in Anchorage, but machinists and retired machinists walk amongst us everywhere and as a group are pretty good people. That would be my approach, find a local machinist and get some first hand direction. There's a whole lot of old timer type methods that really help.
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Old 09-05-2009, 10:18 AM   #14
Crush OP
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Originally Posted by Langanobob
Dennis,

Don't know what kind of an area you live in in Anchorage, but machinists and retired machinists walk amongst us everywhere and as a group are pretty good people. That would be my approach, find a local machinist and get some first hand direction. There's a whole lot of old timer type methods that really help.
This is a really good idea. I'm not sure how to find a retired machinist, but I will start looking.

Thanks, Dennis
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Old 09-08-2009, 10:17 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crush
This is a really good idea. I'm not sure how to find a retired machinist, but I will start looking.

Thanks, Dennis
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