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Old 09-15-2009, 06:15 PM   #61
Armacham
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On a scale from 1-10, how hard would changing my KLR 650 rear tire be?
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Old 09-15-2009, 06:35 PM   #62
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I'm still waiting on that onion dip recipe from Lowdown!
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Old 09-15-2009, 07:22 PM   #63
emerson.biguns
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Armacham
On a scale from 1-10, how hard would changing my KLR 650 rear tire be?

Have you read Neduro's tire changing thread?

Do you have the right tools?

Is anyone going to help you?


If you answered no to all of those... 10.

If you answered yes to all of them....3.



How soon do you need to do it?


Don't pay someone else to do it. You need to know how for your next big trip.


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Old 09-15-2009, 07:38 PM   #64
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I have read that thread, I should most of the tools (full socket set, impact wrench, tire irons), except I would have to use a bike pump because I don't have an aircompressor. I also still need to get some sort of jack or stand or a 2x4 to lift the rear wheel off the ground.

I have probably about 20% tread left on the rear tire, so i should be able to go at least a little while longer, but i want to get a new rear on so i can change the front and rear at the same time the next time around

I've changed regular bicycle tires before, so I imagine it can't be that much different....

How long are the inner tubes usually good for?
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Old 09-15-2009, 07:53 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Armacham
I've changed regular bicycle tires before, so I imagine it can't be that much different....

How long are the inner tubes usually good for?


It's easier and harder than bicycle tires.


Easier, in the sense that pinching and putting holes in the new tubes is a lot harder to do. I always made more holes than I fixed when repairing bicycle tires.

Harder, in the sense that it's more physical. That new tire is a beefy piece of rubber. A preheat in the AZ sun and a lot of DW-40 will make things a lot easier.



If you don't know the age of the existing tube, does it matter? Go ahead and throw a new heavy duty tube in there.



If you want to do it with some help and standby tools and compressor, let me know. I've got plenty of room in a shady garage. I'm not an expert, but have done it before. PM me if you need some moral support.


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Old 09-15-2009, 08:05 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emerson.biguns
If you don't know the age of the existing tube, does it matter? Go ahead and throw a new heavy duty tube in there.



If you want to do it with some help and standby tools and compressor, let me know. I've got plenty of room in a shady garage. I'm not an expert, but have done it before. PM me if you need some moral support.


.
i was planning on replacing the tube for sure, I mostly just wanted to know for the future.

Are you going to be at the RG on thursday? I'd like to know how much I actually do have left on the front and rears and maybe someone could take a peak...
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Old 09-15-2009, 08:20 PM   #67
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When you are picking up your new tire(s) and tube(s), get the rubber strip that covers the ends of the spokes (inside the wheel) as well. It shouldn't cost you more than a buck (seriously).

As already mentioned, you should change at least one tire on each end of your bike with only the tools you normally carry with you on a ride, at least once...preferably before you have to do it on the trail. You will learn a lot.

After that, find someone with a tire changing rig (or spend the $100 on your own). They make life so much easier.

There are plenty of us around to lend a hand if you need it.
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Old 09-15-2009, 08:23 PM   #68
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also I wanted to ask what bike shops you guys liked around town for tires and other junk, so I can at least compare prices before I just straight up order over the internet
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Old 09-15-2009, 08:37 PM   #69
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I needed a tire on a Monday and as all the franchise shops are closed on Sunday and Monday I went to Cycle Gear on Grant. Their prices weren't bad at all and they only charged $15 for mounting and balancing, if you bought the tire there. To boot, I needed a clutch lever for a '96 KTM and the actually HAD it. Every other shop had to order it including the snobby KTM dealer near my home.
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Old 09-15-2009, 08:40 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HoosierTrailmaster
I needed a tire on a Monday and as all the franchise shops are closed on Sunday and Monday I went to Cycle Gear on Grant. Their prices weren't bad at all and they only charged $15 for mounting and balancing, if you bought the tire there. To boot, I needed a clutch lever for a '96 KTM and the actually HAD it. Every other shop had to order it including the snobby KTM dealer near my home.
good to know, they are right around the corner from me...

i'm guessing that is 15 if you bring them the wheel already taken off the bike?
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Old 09-15-2009, 08:48 PM   #71
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Ya, they don't even take full bikes in.
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Old 09-15-2009, 09:59 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Armacham
also I wanted to ask what bike shops you guys liked around town for tires and other junk, so I can at least compare prices before I just straight up order over the internet
I really like these guys.
http://www.onanymoto.com/
Fair prices... will match just about anything you can find online and really nice guys to boot.
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09 KLR 650, blue... Done the Doo!, Thermo-bobed!, LED driving lights, aux fuse box, HID high beam, gel battery, custom racks, tool tube, de-Californicated it, moved main fuses to side cover, relocated plate, PVC mod, Hurricane mod, bypassed the side stand switch...

RIP - 95 Honda VFR750 (the most vulgar shade of yellow I could find in the book!)
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Old 09-15-2009, 10:48 PM   #73
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swee they arent too far from me either, maybe il swing by there tomorrow and check them out
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Old 09-16-2009, 08:04 AM   #74
pringlecan
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get the wheel off of the bike and you need:

valve core remover
two tire irons
baby powder
windex
air source

look up how to change a dirt bike tire on youtube for a brief explanation and have at it. there is a factory mechanic in a video that does a pretty good job showing what to do. for me the hardest part is getting the valve stem in the hole of the rim. don't be intimidated by this, it's not difficult... you just need a bit of patience to get the technique down.

also, clean the bead of the rim and change your rim strip. they are cheap.
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Old 09-16-2009, 05:15 PM   #75
Dave JP
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Tire Changing

...And, when changing the rear tire, always work with the sprocket side down. Things can get painful, otherwise.

Dave
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