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Old 10-30-2009, 08:03 PM   #31
woody's wheel works OP
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some more observations regarding your F800GS bearing failures

hi inmates,,,just got to the first hi speed computer in the last few weeks,,,wheeew what a difference some DSL service makes

perusing the recent posts in Tmex's thread makes me want to pull my hair out...ok,,,here's some more clarifying info...

1,,FYI,,a consistent rule of thumb for setting up/checking bearing/ bearing bore clearances is .0005'' of crush per inch of bearing diameter...

2,, so get the bore correct,,and then figure out the bearing race /ball clearances optimal for your application,,the majority of bearings used in the motorcycle kingdom are C-3...i do not think that chasing down extra loose bearings is the answer in this matter...IMHO correct the mistake ie too much crush and install the correct specifed bearing ,,that way we are back to the original game plan

3,,,i read the master machinists POV regarding man's ability to shave off .001-.003'' of aluminum... a good machinist can do that in a mill any day..and some one with experience can use alternative methods to remove the offending material...the trick is to do it concentrically AND laterally even.

4,,FYI most sheets of paper are .002''+/- .001'' so we aren't talking about a lot of material...having accurate gauges is paramount in not removing too much even by hand sanding/honing.. setting up the wheel in a mill shouldn't be a problem,,, and of course it can be even done in a lathe[unfortunately this requires unlacing and re-lacing/truing],,,,,the trick is getting ALL the way down in the corner and not developing a taper in the corrective process

OBTW,,,it is do-able if you have the tools and skill-set to attempt it!!!!,,me??? i just had a flash of an adjustable reamer we have in my other shop...the perfect tool for shaving off a .001'',
5,,when i read GJGSRider's post #731 form the Tmex thread i yelled HOORAY ATTABOY

Why,,because he took his time,,had the measuring instruments and coincidentally had the exact same anomallies and measurements that i came up with in my analysis several weeks ago...textbook...okay okay we had .0005'' difference on one measurement... i reprinted it below for your perusal

6,,,again,,,for your and every ones sake...
PLEASE,,,,for starters report these incidents to your dealer,,,I'm not a terrible big fan of recalls provided the manufacturer :
1,,steps up to the pump and shares what's going on with his product

2,,notifies his clients promptly

3,,tells them what to do,,ie ''DO NOT RIDE YOUR Motorcycle till we put the replacement parts in'',,,, or the appropriate warning/remedy

4,,fixes it ASAP with the least inconvenience/cost on the customers part

Here's my take on this whole issue,,,,

1,,i am convinced that you and me as consumers can appreciate that mistakes could be made in the millions of steps needed to get the products we buy exactly like the designers envisioned them,,,whether BWOE it's a material speced wrong or a machinist removing too little or too much off an item,,,

2,,i believe we would much rather have the manufacturer have the cajones to inform us of the problem and what he intends to do to correct it as well as the risk factor involved in continuing to use this product with the defect.
BWOE,,,"we've experienced riders complaining that their front axle is snapping,,PLEASE cease and desist from riding your motorcycle immediately!!!,,continuing to do so could result in a crash that could kill or injure you and others!!!!,,,make arrangements with your dealer to have it checked and repaired/replaced with an improved axle....it can be readily identified by this mark,,,there is no cost for parts and/or repair/replacement etc,etc

3,,i KNOW that i want to TRUST my manufacturer to have my safety be a higher concern than revenue losses or loss of image,,,being in a consistent state of denial is not conducive to developing trust and confidence amongst the believers in the marque when we bring our problems and complaints to the service department,,,and more often than not be greeted with the worn out mantra 'What problem????,,,there is no problem!!'

4,,i also know of the tremendo
us pressure that manufacturers are under when dealing with societies like ours that have certain elements waiting in the wings to capitalize on their mistake,,,i've written about it before and i'll say it again,,,,the pressure of litigation and being drawn into court scares the hell out of most of us....one is tempted then to weigh the cost of loss in revenues and your reputation against the costs of litgation or a recall

5,,i am convinced that in the long run we will want to be repeat customers of dealers and manufacturers that play it straight with us,,,that listen to our concerns,, and CREDIBILITY is one of our biggest concerns

6,,,i am convinced that the costs will be far greater should someone get injured or killed due to the recalcitrance of informing us of defects ,,,,the legal beagles are waiting in the wings for these kind of scenarios and our juries are especially benevolent when they hear that a manufacturer had the info and knowingly pretended all was well,,,then there is always the karmic debt that is incurred.....hmmmnnn we'll see how this plays out


woody



[IMG]images/statusiconCrash/post_old.gif[/IMG] 10-28-2009, 01:45 PM #731
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Rear Wheel Bearing Repair and Replacement BMW F800GS
Build date 07/08, 8800 miles

After following various forum posts and reading Woody’s description of the wheel he repaired. I removed the rear wheel of my F800GS motorcycle Sunday to check the wheel bearings. The left (disc) side felt rough and notchy. The right (drive) side felt notchy too, but less than the left. I couldn’t tell if it was transferring across the wheel through the spacer. The bearing in the drive sprocket hub felt smooth.
I disassembled the wheel and measured the bores and bearings and found a press fit of 0.003” tight, on the left (disc) side and a press fit of 0.002” tight, on the right (drive) side. Both bearings felt smoother after they were removed from their bores, however sight roughness was still apparent in the left bearing.

I honed both bores to achieve a press fit of 0.001” (N7) tolerance to new SKF 6204 2RS bearings, heated the hub to 200˚ F and installed the disc side bearing and snap ring and then repeated the heating on the drive side and installed the drive side bearing. When cooled and seated the assembly rotated smoothly and correctly with no feeling of roughness.
I filed a report with the NHTSB and received confirmation yesterday.
I haven't talked to my dealer yet.



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Old 11-22-2009, 02:35 AM   #32
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11-22-09 latest up dates on the F800GS rear bearing problems

just got finished posting this in my parallel thread..

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...4#post11445224

there's daylight at the end of the tunnel at long last

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Old 12-26-2009, 08:17 PM   #33
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Hey Woody, im crossposting this here from that long thread, would be grateful for your opinion mate. Thanks again for all your help

Ive read this hectically long thread with some interest, and think though Woody is on the money for the reasons behing these failures (Thanks Woody for your invaluable advice & private msg´s in getting these $%&#$ bearings off, mate! ), there might be another reason for these bearing failure other than crush.

Please dont get worked up, im not a guru about these things , and my theory is purely speculation. I´d nevertheless like to put it out there, in the hope that we can get to the bottom of this. So please bear with me, any feedback +ve & -ve would be most welcome.

I dont have a BMW dealer to bitch about , the nearest one is 5,000km away in Chile, and I do all my maintenance myself. I also dont have a Woody nearby, but as mentioned above, he was most helpful online, answering many dumbass questions.

My story (you can add me to your list):

My 800GS was one of the first on the floor, model July 2008, bought new in South Africa and Ive since put 12,290km on the clock (yes I now I have not been riding enough, work and then a broken wrist after a nasty encounter with a cage are my excuses!). 80% of my riding is on dirt and about 20% on really rough stuff more suited for plastic bikes.

I rode the bike with an increasing dodgey noise in the back wheel in the last 150km. Took it off, and looked at the bearing, this is what I found:


I could move the inner race about with my finger, in & out about 2mm !! So to say it was "rough" or "notchy" would have been understated; this bearing was well and truely F%&_()d up.



What is clear from this pic is that the inner spacer (between the two wheel bearings inside the hub) was out of position - This is important later.

Here is what the other side (chain side) looked:


Nothing too hectic, a bit of rust perhaps, not much grease left outside the bearing, but it felt smooth and fine. The bearing in the hub was also okay.

On cleaning it up a bit, I noticed that the seal was also badly mauled


Getting this bearing out was a pain in the ass, because the inner race basically fell out with the balls. Getting the outer race out proved to be very difficult. Other bits and pieces also fell out, including a very worn out circular bit you see on the top end of the spacer shown in this photo of Woody´s:

(I realise that mine doesnt have one of these -the little magodey on the end of the spacer- in now, dont think its going to be a problem unless the bearing moves somehow )

Anyway, the remains of the bearing was very, very dry and pretty screwed up. We (myself and my good mate Pat, who has more experience working on bikes than me) had to use a thin weld on the inside of the outer race to get it out. What a pain in the ass.


The hub looked fine, and the other bearing (chain side) came out easily enough with a hammer and screwdriver.

Seating the new bearing (first on the brake side) was not an issue, freezing the bearing and heating the hub to about 100 degrees C.


It basically slipped in and a light tap was needed to seat it in its groove on the inside of the hub. Dont tap on the edge like in this photee, if you must tap, do it in the middle


The ease we had on installation is the reason I suspect I dont have a crush issue on my bike. Nevertheless my bearing problem is now also registered with the NHTSBWHATISITCALLED government website (does this mean the NSA now have me in thier DB? ) . Having measured the OD´s and ID´s using only a vernier, we had a difference of about 0.1-0.2mm (sorry never wrote them down). We felt this was okay, not too tight. The bearing could have been tapped in without heat (although this may have damaged it & consequently I doubt is recommended).

The other bearing was a piece of cake to install too. However, we had problems getting the spacer in between to line up properly, before we tapped the bearing onto the spacer. Putting the wheel back on and tightening up I noticed bearings, even the wheel was very difficult to move Something had to be wrong.

We took it off again and removed the chain-side bearing again
, this time measuring the spacer to see if it protruded above the shoulder where the bearing sits on the hub. We noticed a 0.4mm protrusion on the spacer above the seat position of the bearing.

But we also noticed that when you install the bearing on the chain side it is very, very easy to knock it too tight on the outer race, causing potential lateral stress on the inner race of the bearing while seating the floating right hand bearing.

Im a bit of a lazy ass when it comes to engineering drawings (bear/beer with me) but here follows a couple of powerpoint drawings that I want to use to demonstrate my hypothesis. Taking a cross section through the hub & bearings this is what you see:



The hub is in green, bearing races in blue, circlip in red, showing where the fixed bearing is positioned on the left.


Below is the whole approximate setup when it is bolted together on the wheel. Ive added all the spacers in yellow, everything between the purple swing arm legs. You can see that the wheel can turn because the lateral axle pressure holding the wheel together runs right through on the inner bearing races and spacers:



Now for the our speculation: When we install the floating bearing on the right we typically exert the pressure to get it in on the outer race. This prevents the lateral force damaging the inner race, balls & seals. However the inner race stops up against the spacer inside the hub before the outer race reaches the back wall, and a residual force may be built up on the inner race if the bearing does not literally slip into position on the spacer by hand. This force is likely be transferred through the spacer accross to the bearing on the left hand side, which cannot move at all thanks to the circlip, and this is the reason why I think the bearing failed prematurely. Here is a simplified and exaggerated picture showing what I think is happening.


We found that the the lateral force builds up very quickly on the internal spacer as you seat the floating bearing on the right, and that it literally only has to touch the spacer before it is in the correct position and prevents the spacer from moving out of position. If the bearing has to be hammered in at all, this lateral force will quickly and easily be exterted to the inner race and the result cannot be good for the bearing. In our case it was really bad the first time we installed it, because we were probably too agressive in getting the bearing in before it heated up in the hub.

So having fiddled so much I think my bearings wont last long again (I think I may have hurt both of them, only having replaced the one twice!) so I will be checking often. I´d like to hear what the experts say on this.
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Old 12-27-2009, 09:49 PM   #34
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some more tips and explanations for Bluebull2007 and the rest of you

WOW,,,,i can see that you are taking this seriously,,,,thanks for all the drawings etc


ok,,,,so far everything you did seems copesetic...got lost a lil bit on what you were hammering on etc...ideally we do not want to hammer on the inner races during installation,,,,using that big socket is ok or just reusing the old bearing/outer race as a drift works just fine too if ya have to tap the bearings in,,,the important part is not cocking the bearings ie tapping too much on one side....

ideally this can all be done with an alignment tool [i use the axle]and press or just with the heat n freeze method which ideally requires no tapping

the fact that the center spacer is longer than the bearing seating surfaces on hub bodes well....the crush factor problem is theoretically eliminated..however....

NOW here's where i think your theory about excess loads will be accounted for and explained,,along with our solution [ie if i understood what you were trying to say]

FYI,,,the bmw set-up is the type/design where they use one bearing held in place by a circlip or large nut...this bearing does the locating and essentially makes sure the wheel has very little lateral movement...in this case they have abs rings and a brake disc that they want to keep maximum control over,,,the opposite bearing is usually allowed to free float a bit

the 2 ways you can easily put too much pre-load on these bearings is by either
A...installing the sprocket side first and seating it in as far as it goes and then installing the disc side bearing all the way til it seats,,ya have to on this side or ya won't get the retaining clip in..this will automatically put a pre-load on both bearings

or,,,,
B...installing the disc bearing first with its retaining ring and then tapping the sprocket side bearing in all the way on the outer race,,,both ways will put tension on the whole set-up,,if you were to put your finger in the inner races and turn them,,, the odds are they will feel notchy

i ALWAYS check for this and apply this remedy

Rx= drop your axle in from the disc side...you can use your axle like a slide hammer or just get a hammer and give the end of your axle a little rap from the disc end,,the sprocket sides bearing's outer race will move toward the chain a tiny bit and unload/free the pressure,,,VOILA,,,your bearings will not feel crunchy any more

UNLESS of course you have the undersized bore....

this morning i had another flash regarding your notion....and how this pre-load we are talking about and experiencing can exacerbate the problem

like i said earlier,,i ALWAYS check that the bearings are turning smoothly after performing a bearing R&R...that's our goal...

now in a perfect world if the bearing bore were machined with the appropriate crush,,that little bit of pre-load wouldn't be a problem because the ''loose'' bearing would simply move over enough to achieve free-play....however if the bore is undersized then it will be more difficult to relax and align itself ie it will be under pressure from 2 directions,,laterally from the outer races being crunshed by us from tapping em in too far,,,and longitudinally from the crush of the undersized bore....and since the disc side bore is routinely smaller than the sprocket side,,, it will and does fail first.

in the diagram below ideally it should end up

1,,disc side,,, no space between retaining ring and bearing as well as bearing and the outer race seating surface in line with the edges of the inner/outer race and spacer,,,,because this bearing is supposed to locate/lock lateral movement

kind of like ya had in your first diagram



2,,sprocket/chain side,,,,minimally .010-.020''space between outer race and the seating surface on the hub,,,ie this is supposed to be there so that you won't ever crush /pre-load the bearings when you tighten your axle nut..HOWEVER the TRICK IS TO END UP having the outer and inner races of this bearing run in the same plane ie without a lateral load on them

3,,,all the inner races and inner and outer spacers will end up being jammed together when you tighten the axle nut

Bluebull2007,,,perhaps you can modify your drawing to depict what i'm saying...the finished drawing should depict the inner/outer bearing races being in line with each other and a lil space between the outer race of the sprocket side bearing and the seating surface of the hub

what is depicted here is the pre-loaded bearing ..it would be more accurate if the disc side had no space between the bearing and retaining ring and if the inner end of the races and spacer lined up
do ya see what i'm describing???




so there ya have it,,,,a lil fine tuning our understandings regarding "WHAT"S REAL-ly ''going on in there....

OBTW,,,your outer seal got distorted when all the bits and pieces packed up behind it and puked,,,,regarding your spacer,,,it may or may not have had the little positioning ring on it,,hence your spacer drops down and makes it harder to slip your axle through..it's not going to hurt you technically provided it is .010-.020' minimally longer then the bearing seating surface in the hub

woody

and you can x-post this to the tmex thread

Bluebull,,,FYI i'm LOL because most everything in this last post was essentially said before in the very first post of this thread,,unless i'm missing something...this time the spotlight was placed on the issue of the lateral pre-load and the deleterious effects it can have...go re-read and see if you catch my drift...


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woody's wheel works screwed with this post 12-28-2009 at 07:42 PM
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Old 01-01-2010, 06:30 PM   #35
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Woody as usual youre spot on, thanks . I guess my non-mechanical mind was in reverse when I read your first post. Which is why I did the drawings, because I think in pictures and all these words confuse me no end. Im a little slow and need to work through them for a while before I get it.

Ive read your post twice now and I think the second time I understood it better, sorry it took me so long to get back to you.

Anyway once again I appreciate all the free advice and as I said, if you get yourself down to Peru, beers are definitely on me

Is there any reason why you dont post in the tmex thread? I think it would solve a lot of the hanahana blablabla going on! :P

Have a blessed 2010 with lots of bearings to fix!
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Old 01-01-2010, 06:56 PM   #36
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why i don't post in the tmex thread...hmmmnnnn

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebull2007
Woody as usual youre spot on, thanks . I guess my non-mechanical mind was in reverse when I read your first post. Which is why I did the drawings, because I think in pictures and all these words confuse me no end. Im a little slow and need to work through them for a while before I get it.

Ive read your post twice now and I think the second time I understood it better, sorry it took me so long to get back to you.

Anyway once again I appreciate all the free advice and as I said, if you get yourself down to Peru, beers are definitely on me

salud y posedas y amor y tiempo para gozar....if i have it right,,si ,,i'd love that,,,
Is there any reason why you dont post in the tmex thread? I think it would solve a lot of the hanahana blablabla going on! :P

i was a naughty boy and spammed once too often in a hissy fit with a former since banned membe rof the forum,,,sure miss chimming in...

Have a blessed 2010 with lots of bearings to fix!
same to you and your beloveds...w
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Old 01-02-2010, 12:16 PM   #37
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is this the final answer????...YES!!! and here's the RX

so i was just lurking on the tmex thread and came across this post from Red Hawk47 and his reply along with Joel Wisman's explanation of the factory tool ......FYI,,,i spent half hour talking with Bob at RAD about fine tuning the F800GS billet hubs and making doubly sure about the sequence we wanted to use to insure zero pre-load on the finished bearing,,

here's what we agreed upon,,,because the same technique will provide all of you with a bullet proof way of assembling your bearings the way they were intended to operate and that is:


A...for the disc side bearing to control lateral movement we want it pressed tight against its seat and held in place by the circlip


B...the sprocket side bearing's outer race is to free float while the inner race should rest tight against the inner spacer with no preload..we can accomplish this goal ideally by:

Rx...having 2 flat faced drifts shy of 47mm od circa at least 2 inches long ready to use [i'll get some pics of these later]

1...heating the hub while the bearings are frozen,,,then dropping the bearing side in first all the way til it seats and here's the trick,,you need to take the 47mm flat tool and tap the bearing to make sure it is seated,,

2...then stand the hub sprocket side up on this flatfaced tool

3...insert the spacer with centering ring down toward the disc side

4...drop the next bearing in and if necessary tap it in place with the second flatfaced tool

5...let it cool so that the hub shrinks and grabs the bearings

6...flip over and install the circlip with the sharp edge facing outwards

7...install the disc seal

8...check your bearings they should be perfectly located and spin free

there ya have it...tis the proper sequencing AND use of flat faced installers that will give you consistent results..of course in a hub properly bored

woody

[IMG]images/statusiconCrash/post_old.gif[/IMG] 12-30-2009, 07:06 PM #827
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelWisman
Bluebull2007, the factory tool we use to install bearings has a projection in the center that fits the bearing inner hole and is flat all the way across to apply pressure squarely on both the inner and outer races simultaneously.


This is the key to alleviating your problem Bluebull2007. The right side bearing is intended to "float" in it's position in the hub. It looked like you used a socket to press the bearing in - that presses the outer race only. By using a solid tool the presses both the outer and inner races the bearing will stop at the sleeve and the outer race will be in the proper "float" position.
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Old 01-05-2010, 08:31 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woody's wheel works

Rx...having 2 flat faced drifts shy of 47mm od circa at least 2 inches long ready to use [i'll get some pics of these later]

What I don't get in all of this, is that this bearing arrangement, one being retain by a circlip the other floating with a spacer in between, is nothing new. I've got two bikes the in garage with this system. I've replaced the bearings in both, and never took the time to ensure that the bearings weren't preloaded. Simply drove the floater in until it stopped and went out and put thousands of miles on the bikes.

I know I'm not the only KLR, Transalp, Vstrom, etc owner who's done this. Why's the Beemer any different?
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Old 01-05-2010, 01:00 PM   #39
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so what's th edeal with these F800GS wheels that makes em different???

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boon Booni
What I don't get in all of this, is that this bearing arrangement, one being retain by a circlip the other floating with a spacer in between, is nothing new. I've got two bikes the in garage with this system. I've replaced the bearings in both, and never took the time to ensure that the bearings weren't preloaded. Simply drove the floater in until it stopped and went out and put thousands of miles on the bikes.

I know I'm not the only KLR, Transalp, Vstrom, etc owner who's done this. Why's the Beemer any different?
so dear friends,,,what makes these different is that the ones that are giving trouble are the ones where the bore is undersized thereby causing excess longtitudinal pressure...bores that are properly speced,,even when preloaded will allow the bearing to shift slightly to unload the preload,,,,

so when you have too much pressure on the bearing caused by the bore being undersized well then the ability of the bearing to move laterally gets impaired and won't release unless you take the time to do that via the instruction,hints and diagrams we've posted here

by taking the lateral pre-load pressure off ,you are enhancing the bearings life ,,,same goes for having the correct bore,,,it puts just the right amount of vertical/longtitudinal pre-load on the bearing

get it????

woody
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Old 10-30-2010, 07:45 AM   #40
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Getting my bearings

Great thread here. Installed new bearings in both front and rear rims following the info here. All bearing dropped right in without only a tiny tap. Heated everything to 100 C and froze the bearings. Bought bearings at a bearing supply house (a 10 pack) and paid less than half for better quality than BMW was hawking. Didn't have "2 flat faced drifts shy of 47mm od circa at least 2 inches long" but mocked something up using some very thick washers I found and some sockets. Everything went smooth as silk but I was a little bummed when I stuck my finger in the rear bearings and they wouldn't turn easily. Woody to the rescue..I slid the axle in from the sprocket side, put the nut on a few turns and used it like a slide hammer and gave it a couple of pretty gentle pulls. Now the bearings are like butter. Thanks everyone! By the way all 5 bearings were toast at 7000km, (I've been getting them very wet...) the rears probably at 6000 since they felt bad when I checked them then. I now have a nice set of rims from Woody and a second set for street. Not sure if the one factory rear hub I still have has any undersized bores but like I said all the bearings dropped in easy peasy and I can't afford to have a second set built at the moment.
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Old 06-24-2011, 07:02 PM   #41
David13
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Location: Los Angeles area (SoBay)
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I now see that the GS set up is somewhat different from the F800ST. But they have bearing failures also.
I had an F800ST, 2008, 22k miles. The sprocket seemed to wobble. I thought it was the sprocket, a two piece with rubber absorbers in it.
It wasn't. It was the inner race of the needle bearings rotating on the shaft (drive shaft/axle).
It had worn into a somewhat loose state.
I emailed Woody, and he had nothing on the ST. Only the GS.
As I understand your posts, the bearing press is the same. A hot cold application, then a press.
(I cannot see beating them on. But I have a 12 ton press. I can press any bearing.)
However, I had Irv Seavers do mine, as I needed the full axle; the whole kit.
Since I was 8 months out of warranty on this bike they offered me nothing. The bill was $910 with me taking everything out, and putting it back in. They did one hour to do the hot cold press.
I would like to get the NTSA info on your claim. I'll join it. I would also like to get info on where to send my request on contribution by BMW regional.
But those bearings should not be failing at 22 k miles, nor, like some of the other ST's at 7500 miles or so.
dc
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Old 09-20-2011, 10:52 AM   #42
BluWolf
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I just swapped my stock tires out last week and checked the bearings. Notchy and catchy.

Turned bike into dealership on Saturday.

Awaiting feedback.
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Old 09-29-2011, 09:01 AM   #43
Kaw4Life
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My outer seals were toast. Bike has 33K and is on the factory seals and spacers. Both should have been replace 20K miles ago. Only the brake side bearing was shot, the other 2 were ok, not great but ok.
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Old 10-11-2011, 04:16 AM   #44
Ceri JC
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Just to chip in my experience.

I have a 2009 F8, owned since new and only ridden by me. I'm over 17 stone in my riding kit and routinely ride with full luggage. I generally ride very hard on the road. The bike has its fair share of being ridden offroad too. At 38K miles or thereabouts my rear wheel bearings wore out. They didn't fail catastrophically, it came on gradually and you could detect it by rocking the rims laterally when mounted to the bike, as all other wheel bearings that have just "worn out" I've seen have. The bike was still ridable. The bike was out of warranty so I got the local independent BMW specialist to replace them (with whatever the current official BMW part is) when it was already in there for a service. He also replaced the spacers and cush drive rubbers at the same time. The new ones seem fine.

I think the above is all perfectly fair, given the use (and intended use) of the bike and what I would expect.
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Old 10-11-2011, 08:49 AM   #45
angrywhiteguy
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So....do all f 800 GS suffer this fate or is it a small run of hubs. I have an 09 with 17000 km on it with no bearing issues....shoudl i be worrying or are some fine?
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