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Old 06-30-2013, 08:41 AM   #601
cjm1219
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Got it after it sat overnight with penetrating oil

I think lack of grease was the issue. Was dry and not really dirty at all.

Spooning on the new T-63 seemed easy in comparison.
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Old 04-20-2014, 08:11 PM   #602
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Reviving this epic thread.

I replaced the rear on my 690 Enduro yesterday for the first time with a new MT-21. As it was my first time, it took me more than 2 hours, but now I know what to do and it should be way less than that next time. I used two of the 15" Motion Pro levers, one Motion Pro Bead Buddy, and another shorter MP tire lever and the rim protectors (damn those black rims!)

No one's brought up the Kaurit Tire Mounting tool or the copy made in the US, the Baja No Pinch tire tool. They look pretty good if you're going to be changing tires regularly.

One of the parts of the process that confounded me was after I had gotten the bead off on both sides, I had a hard time getting the wheel out. I pushed the rim down to one side, but it still took a fair amount of effort to get both beads over one of the rims so it was able to be removed. Is there a good trick to that?
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Old 04-20-2014, 10:39 PM   #603
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Just turn the tire/ wheel upright and push down on the tire to make it oval, then rotate the wheel 90* through the wide part of the oval and pull it out.
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Old 04-21-2014, 02:13 AM   #604
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Letter J View Post
Just turn the tire/ wheel upright and push down on the tire to make it oval, then rotate the wheel 90* through the wide part of the oval and pull it out.
Thank you! Totally logical but escaped me.
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Old 04-21-2014, 08:38 AM   #605
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Lube is your friend.

Do not be afraid to use some fancy tire lube or soapy water getting the old tire off, also.

The levers work to spoon off the tire or one side of the tire... if you get in a pinch and need a little more help.
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Old 04-21-2014, 09:47 AM   #606
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Gen-
I found this video (1st of 3 partes) to be most useful:

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qw0B2gIwbBg

Also I carry a small spray bottle with a small amount of dishwashing liquid and alcohol that I use to clean off my glasses, visors, etc. but it also does duty as tire lube.
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Old 04-21-2014, 03:50 PM   #607
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Thanks ramjet. I missed that one but watched a bunch of tire professionals change mx tires on YT. The thing is that enduro tires are much tougher than MX tire. I hear the D908RR is really tough as are the Motoz tires.
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Old 04-22-2014, 05:03 AM   #608
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There's a video with Adam Riemann (noted Aussie enduro rider) where he talks about greasing tubes before installation.

I don't see other videos advocating for this but the vast majority of tire changing guides are for MX riders.

Does anyone else grease their tubes before installation? It makes sense to me...
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Old 04-22-2014, 05:10 AM   #609
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen View Post
There's a video with Adam Riemann (noted Aussie enduro rider) where he talks about greasing tubes before installation.

I don't see other videos advocating for this but the vast majority of tire changing guides are for MX riders.

Does anyone else grease their tubes before installation? It makes sense to me...
I've heard of greasing/lubing up the Bib-Mousse inserts but never a tube. Baby or Talcum powder is the most used anti-friction aid I've seen.
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:43 PM   #610
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Having always used a tire changing machine, tonite I mounted my new D606 on my 625SXC's rear wheel using this how to instead.

"1) If you are using force, you are doing it wrong."

Yep. Anytime things got difficult, I stopped and rethought what I was doing. It took me about an hour to do the change, but everything went perfect.

Thanks Ned, your how to was like having a cool head let me know what I was doing wrong.
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Old 09-14-2014, 12:20 AM   #611
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new rider, last time i changed tire was on a bicycle 20 yrs ago. figured i should give it a go.

messed up just about every step of the way somehow.

currently stuck on putting the new tire on, pretty sure it's something about "keeping the bead in the dish" seeing as i can't put in more than about half of the 2nd side.

gonna try again tomorrow. i'm not too optimistic.
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Old 09-14-2014, 06:34 AM   #612
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Make sure the tire is warm, sunshine or in the house on a heat vent or beside a radiator. Lubricant and patience, not brute force will win the day.
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Old 12-16-2014, 06:24 PM   #613
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neduro View Post
Let's start assuming you have the wheel off the bike, and that the wheel had a tube in it which you have removed. So we have three parts: a bare wheel, a mousse, and a new tire.

The next post will cover removing a mousse, but if you already got it on, you might not need that. Thanks to C.Vestal for running the camera.

Step 1: Grease the mousse

This is really important. A dry mousse will not last long, where a properly greased one will shrug off an incredible amount of abuse. Many folks say you can use Murphy's soap or the like, but I disagree. The soap is water soluble, so it will disappear if the bike gets wet. I believe the only correct lube is the Michelin Bib Mousse lube sold for the purpose. The first time you install a mousse, use a whole tube per mousse. Thereafter, freshen so that it's nicely greased.





Then smear it around so that the whole thing has an even coating.

2) Put the mousse in the tire:



This is roughly akin to wrestling a greased python. Have fun. And yes, the silicone lube does stain, so dress accordingly.



3) Set the rim into the tire/mousse assembly with the rimlock correctly positioned (rim, tire bead, rimlock):



4) Lay the package down flat, and begin spooning on the first side. This is not much different than a tube, except, you don't have to worry about pinching anything! Hooray!



Not a great picture, but just levering on that first side:



5) Lever on the second side- here's where the magic happens.

I start at the rimlock. Others don't. But this is my thread so here's what I do:





Now I've just taken small bites and worked around the rim until I get here:



To this point, the change has been if anything easier than changing a tube- no pinches to worry about, no valve stem to find the hole in the rim. But now it gets tough, because the tire is fully inflated in volume, and compressing it onto the rim takes some pressure.

Here's the secret- use a tire lever on the opposite side to push the bead down in. Don't bother trying until the bead is stretched tight (as it is in the last pic above). Now, insert the tire iron upside down in the bit that's already on, and use your foot to push down and force the bead into the dish of the rim.



The tension will be released on the opposite side, allowing you to finish your work.



Presto, wallah!



Acute eyes will notice a valve stem present. That has two purposes- first, to seal the rim, and second, sometimes the tire doesn't seat on the rim easily (out of round). You can add air and that usually sorts the problem (even though the air leaks right back out, the momentary rise in pressure forces the tire to center).
Bringing this back to the top for a very important question:

Where are the Chaco's? Clearly mousse changes are harder than tubes!
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Old 12-16-2014, 07:40 PM   #614
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Eh?

Glad to see this thread, as whilst riding the other day I noticed the handling of the bike was getting weird and sure enough, the front tire was going down.
Luckily I was only a few blocks from home and made it there, but by this time the tire was completely loosened, as in the bead broken, from the rim.
No shops nearby so will have to wait to go into the nearest big city to get a tube.
One thing I noticed when I aired the tire back up (just checking to see if it would, and it did...for a while), is that try as I might, I couldn't get it positioned uniformly on the rim, it was always a bit 'out of round'.

I'm kind of concerned about this, for when I go to put my new tube in.

Am I missing something simple? Or is it just a 'hold your mouth right' and it goes on and seats correctly?
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Old 12-16-2014, 08:27 PM   #615
Kevan Garrett
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Not again

"This is roughly akin to wrestling a greased python. Have fun. And yes, the silicone lube does stain, so dress accordingly."

Man, how many times have I heard that?

Peace out

Kevan
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