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Old 04-22-2015, 10:14 PM   #1
taranaki OP
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Maxi scoot rear puncture. Patch or replace?

Low-miles Diablo on a Burgman 400. Screw entered about midway between center and shoulder. Deflated after I parked it - no sidewall damage.

Some say never patch a tubeless street tire. Others say a good patch job is fine if it's not on or adjacent to the shoulder.

Would you drop a Franklin for a new tire or try a patch?



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Old 04-22-2015, 10:21 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taranaki View Post
Low-miles Diablo on a Burgman 400. Screw entered about midway between center and shoulder. Deflated after I parked it - no sidewall damage.

Some say never patch a tubeless street tire. Others say a good patch job is fine if it's not on or adjacent to the shoulder.

Would you drop a Franklin for a new tire or try a patch?
Replace the tire. Motorcycle tires are not like car tires. For one thing, you have only two of them. If the patch blows at speed, you may not make it home. Why take the chance?

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Old 04-23-2015, 01:55 AM   #3
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You can't 'patch' a tubeless tyre...I assume you meant plug it.
Or meant get it vulcanised (which is effectively a permanent plug melted into place).

To me it would depend on how much tread was left on the tyre.
If approaching replacement time then it's a no brainer and I'd bin it and get a new tyre fitted.

On a good tyre I'd get it repaired if it's in the safe zone and yours sounds like it is.
If I was away on a trip I'd just use my plug kit but if at home I'd get it vulcanised.
A good tyre fitting place would be able to tell you if it's fix or replace.
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Old 04-23-2015, 03:26 AM   #4
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Take it to a good tire shop and see if they can fix it permanently. I had the same situation but the puncture was too close too the sidewall and the shop said it was not wise to fix it.
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Old 04-23-2015, 03:47 AM   #5
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I once had a rear tire plugged on my Yamaha Venture using a sticky string. I put another 14000 miles on that tire with no problems. I have also plugged a couple of other MC/scooter rear tires using sticky strings as well as numerous car tires. I have never had one fail. I guess there is a chance the plug may fail but I'd do it again as long as it was a rear tire and not a real big hole. It would be better to have it plugged professionally from the inside but good luck finding a shop willing to do it.

From other threads like this the general consensus is that sticky strings work well but other types of plugs are more likely to fail. I used the plug that came with my BMW to plug a rear tire. It got me home but was flat the next day.
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:42 AM   #6
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I once had a tire given to me with a screw hole in it that was like new otherwise. Had my local service station put a inside patch/plug on it and ran it till it wore out, no problems. I also plunged a tire and drove that for a couple thousand miles with on problems. Both of these were on rear tires and were changed to a new tire within the riding season.
If you do fix it keep a eye on the pressure and plug.
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:47 AM   #7
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I would replace it.
Then I would likely have the damaged tired plugged professionally and just have it around for a spare for those times when you need to take a long trip and would want an emergency spare.
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Old 04-23-2015, 06:57 AM   #8
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:11 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarka View Post
You can't 'patch' a tubeless tyre...I assume you meant plug it.
Or meant get it vulcanised (which is effectively a permanent plug melted into place).

.
I've seen tubeless tire get a patch to seal a hole. They take the tire off wheel then apply patch from the inside. The tire shop says this is the proper way to permanently seal a hole. A plug is just a temp fix. Vulcanise can also be done too but I only saw this done on inner tube repair.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:34 AM   #10
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OK, how many of you have taken a motorcycle or scooter tire to a shop and asked them to patch it. There are a few shops that will do it but most won't due to liability.
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Old 04-23-2015, 07:40 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klaviato
I once had a rear tire plugged on my Yamaha Venture using a sticky string. I put another 14000 miles on that tire with no problems. I have also plugged a couple of other MC/scooter rear tires using sticky strings as well as numerous car tires. I have never had one fail. I guess there is a chance the plug may fail but I'd do it again as long as it was a rear tire and not a real big hole. It would be better to have it plugged professionally from the inside but good luck finding a shop willing to do it.

From other threads like this the general consensus is that sticky strings work well but other types of plugs are more likely to fail. I used the plug that came with my BMW to plug a rear tire. It got me home but was flat the next day.
Like you, I just plugged mine (rear tire). Several thousand miles and no problems. Scooter was totaled last Fall so I'll never know how much further it would have gone.

I say it depends on the size of the hole and the mileage/age of the tire. Some tires just aren't worth fixing.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:05 AM   #12
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Like you, I just plugged mine (rear tire). Several thousand miles and no problems. Scooter was totaled last Fall so I'll never know how much further it would have gone.

I say it depends on the size of the hole and the mileage/age of the tire. Some tires just aren't worth fixing.
I always carry a plug kit with me so I'll plug any tire to get me home. After that mileage and age are important. I won't run a plugged tire as low on tread as I would otherwise so if the tire is fairly worn I'd replace it. If it's got over half it's tread left I'll run it plugged. I once got a huge hole in the rear tire of my R1100GS. It took 2 sticky strings to plug it. I rode it home carefully and then replaced the tire. That tire was fairly new.
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Old 04-23-2015, 09:08 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by klaviator View Post
I always carry a plug kit with me so I'll plug any tire to get me home. After that mileage and age are important. I won't run a plugged tire as low on tread as I would otherwise so if the tire is fairly worn I'd replace it. If it's got over half it's tread left I'll run it plugged. I once got a huge hole in the rear tire of my R1100GS. It took 2 sticky strings to plug it. I rode it home carefully and then replaced the tire. That tire was fairly new.
More or less my POV. I've carried plug kits and inflators on long trips. If the hole is small and not too close to sidewall I'd have no problem ridding on a plugged tire. Unfortunately the only time I've had a tire issue on a trip the thread zipped off (weird never seen or heard of it on a bike before) and that was "interesting" but got to the side of the road safely and had the bike towed to a shop.
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Old 04-23-2015, 09:50 AM   #14
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If it's a small nicely round hole in the tread area you can plug it from the outside. I've successfully used those "sticky string" plugs. If the hole is jagged or more of a slit, you're likely have to patch it from the inside to make it seal permanently.
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Old 04-23-2015, 10:39 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by cdwise View Post
More or less my POV. I've carried plug kits and inflators on long trips. If the hole is small and not too close to sidewall I'd have no problem ridding on a plugged tire. Unfortunately the only time I've had a tire issue on a trip the thread zipped off (weird never seen or heard of it on a bike before) and that was "interesting" but got to the side of the road safely and had the bike towed to a shop.
I carry a plug kit too and have used it twice. They work well enough, but I won't ride on it farther than necessary to get a new tire. I'm inherently suspicious of a tire that has been compromised, so I replace it as a matter of course. I'd feel pretty stupid if I went down because I cheaped out on a new tire. I know better and a new tire doesn't cost that much. That's just my POV. I prefer to err on the side of safety.

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