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Old 04-08-2015, 01:45 PM   #1
fritzcoinc OP
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What's a Cagiva?

This forum is here to tell you all about the Cagiva motorcycle. All models. This is the place for technical discussion, recommendations, and general information.

For example: 2000 Cagiva Gran Canyon with 900 CC Ducati two valve motor:

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96 XR650L, 96 Guzzi Sport, 07 BMW K1200GT,
86 Husky 400 XCE, 00 Husky Te 610 e, 1999 Husky TC610 SM, 2000 Cagiva GC; Google: TX7

fritzcoinc screwed with this post 04-09-2015 at 09:13 AM
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Old 04-08-2015, 02:16 PM   #2
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GC fuel pump

The Cagiva GC and several Ducati models ( 748, 919 to name a few ) probably suffer form short fuel pump life due to the location of the fuel pump in the motorcycle. The pump is at the lowest part of the fuel system and water and trash settle there causing short pump life. Luckily the fuel pump is available at a reasonable price on EBay.

2000 Cagiva GC fuel pump Bosch PN is 580 254 049

To connect the pump suction line there is a rubber reducing ell that is no longer available. There is however a plastic ( nylon 6 6 or PVDF material and also brass ) reducing ells available from McMaster Carr. One of these ells, a couple pieces of fuel line, and some clamps and you have a very reliable substitute for the OEM part.



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96 XR650L, 96 Guzzi Sport, 07 BMW K1200GT,
86 Husky 400 XCE, 00 Husky Te 610 e, 1999 Husky TC610 SM, 2000 Cagiva GC; Google: TX7
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Old 04-08-2015, 02:33 PM   #3
rainmaker8
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here we go!

Nice job! way to take initiative. I've been meaning to do this for a while... so thank you!
I mean the yahoo groups was great and all but we need a little more dynamic situation I think...

However, do us a favor and edit your titles and message to spell Gran Canyon without the "d"!
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Old 04-08-2015, 02:38 PM   #4
rainmaker8
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LINKS to OTHER THREADS for Cagiva Gran Canyon

just to avoid being redundant, go there for these specific topics:

Cagiva Gran Canyon Picture Thread
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=65081

Cagiva Gran Canyon - yea or nay?
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=569334

Cagiva Gran Canyon Aluminum Skid Plate Build
http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=648543

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Old 04-08-2015, 03:07 PM   #5
fritzcoinc OP
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Cagiva Gran Canyon rear suspension rebuild

The Cagiva GC has a pretty typical multi link rear suspension. It is well engineered and very easy to disassemble except for one shaft. This is the front lower link pivot. For some reason the Cagivaites decided this axle for the pivot should screw into one side of the frame. Instead of giving the axle a socket head they used a large flat slot. It has proved for most a very difficult part of the rear suspension to remove.

Here's what I used to get it out. The pivot axle is the gold item in the photo. There are drawings showing the dimensions of this axle and details of all the tool with PN's.:



You'll need to machine or grind the flat blade socket to the dimensions shown in the drawing. I had to heat the side of the frame with the threads and then a few hits with the hand held impact driver and the axle came right out.
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96 XR650L, 96 Guzzi Sport, 07 BMW K1200GT,
86 Husky 400 XCE, 00 Husky Te 610 e, 1999 Husky TC610 SM, 2000 Cagiva GC; Google: TX7
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Old 04-08-2015, 03:08 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainmaker8 View Post
Nice job! way to take initiative. I've been meaning to do this for a while... so thank you!
I mean the yahoo groups was great and all but we need a little more dynamic situation I think...

However, do us a favor and edit your titles and message to spell Gran Canyon without the "d"!

WHAT???? I don't see any typos!! Have you had your glasses checked lately?
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96 XR650L, 96 Guzzi Sport, 07 BMW K1200GT,
86 Husky 400 XCE, 00 Husky Te 610 e, 1999 Husky TC610 SM, 2000 Cagiva GC; Google: TX7
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Old 04-08-2015, 04:18 PM   #7
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I like the idea of a thread here... easier for me to follow. And I believe subscribing to it will make it more dynamic.... or at least that has been my experience in the past. Good on ya fritzcoinc for taking the initiative.

And, to contribute a little useful info..... I used the #74 20Lumen LED lights in the GC Dash recently from a place called SuperBrightLEDs and let me tell you, it makes a HUGE difference. Go with the same color as the lens for that function....Green in Green, Red in Red.... White behind any colored lens just washes the color out.
Still working on a resolve for the low fuel light staying on with an LED (the reason I put the LEDs in... Oh, well) The resistor in parallel wont work by all accounts I can find, so I'm thinking a simple relay to trigger the LED is the way I'm going. that also allows me to use a flashing LED which may make it more noticeable to my aging eyes.
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Old 04-08-2015, 08:17 PM   #8
flemsmith
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don't quite understand your comment about the low fuel light. I replaced all my instrument lights with led's as well. 1999 Gran Canyon. It's actually listed for sale in the flea market, but every time I ride it I start thinking I'll just keep it. Don't notice anything different about the amber low fuel led....but then I'm not sure I've actually run the fuel tank low enough for it to come on since....

can eplain?

roy
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Old 04-09-2015, 06:33 AM   #9
adventure950
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Cagivas - Don't forget the Elefants the fore runner of the Gran canyon, I have had both an Elefant and a Grand canyon - the grand canyon is the better road bike and a bit more comfy on the saddle, The elefant has few but some comprimises for road use but is a better all rounder if some dirt or gravel roads are to be taken into the trip - either way its still way ahead of most the other stuff around from the time and even todate in many respects.
Pictured below my Elefant a 750 version - currently weighs in about 180 kgs the engine is excellent loads of torque from way down just above 2000 revs and thumping mid range - runs out of steam around a 100mph.
Way lighter and more or as powerful as as many of the similar displacement modern dirt bikes around with excellent handling, balance and build quality.
So far very reliable but stil a youngster at only 18 years old now.

Think of it as a bit like mini version of a KTM 950 adventure to ride and you would not be a mile off.

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Old 04-09-2015, 07:53 AM   #10
fritzcoinc OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fearless View Post
And, to contribute a little useful info..... I used the #74 20Lumen LED lights in the GC Dash recently from a place called SuperBrightLEDs and let me tell you, it makes a HUGE difference. Go with the same color as the lens for that function....Green in Green, Red in Red.... White behind any colored lens just washes the color out.
Good info! I bought some LED's from a rubbish supplier. When I got them they weren't worth putting in.

I like the idea of same color bulb as the lenses. I've done this for turn signals and like the uniform color of the light. It just seems to show up better. I want to try red LEDs for illumination of the dash, just because it looks cool!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure950 View Post
Cagivas - Don't forget the Elefants the fore runner of the Gran canyon,
Forget Elefants!!
Check out the 1st post, this is a "Cagiva" thread.
Even though you have one of those old and dangerous Elefants welcome to this ADV thread.

I feel bad you have an Elefant, I'd like to help you out by taking it off your hands. Save you the worry, so you'll sleep better.


Way cool bike you have there!!!

Is the elephant decal on the fairing OEM? I'd like to get one somehow.
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96 XR650L, 96 Guzzi Sport, 07 BMW K1200GT,
86 Husky 400 XCE, 00 Husky Te 610 e, 1999 Husky TC610 SM, 2000 Cagiva GC; Google: TX7
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Old 04-09-2015, 08:28 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flemsmith View Post
.... Don't notice anything different about the amber low fuel led....but then I'm not sure I've actually run the fuel tank low enough for it to come on since....
can eplain?
roy
As I understand, the Low Fuel sensor in the tank has a minimal voltage through it all the time. With fuel, that sensor stays cool, but when the fuel level drops it becomes warmer and, through some bit of electrical sorcery, allows enough voltage to light the light. That minimal voltage is enough to light an LED but not an incandescent.

LEDs are polarity sensitive... My guess is if you haven't ever seen it on, you probably got it in backwards, and that could be a worse scenario. At least if its on all the time you know it's not working .....
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Old 04-09-2015, 01:40 PM   #12
adventure950
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Is the elephant decal on the fairing OEM? I'd like to get one somehow.[/QUOTE]

Hi Fritzcoinc, The elefant stickers I got made up at my local sticker shop - cost about 6.00 for the pair including the Elefant writing also for up the tank side

I would think most decal shops can look up the Cagiva elefant on internet and copy it for you.

Oh bye the way i had to bring up those awful elefant's - i know you folk always try to dismiss them and deny they were ever around - I've scuppered that one for you.

Here's another pic mid rebuild - cos it had been neglected and abused I was nursing it back to health.


Tchus Jake.
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Old 04-09-2015, 01:47 PM   #13
fritzcoinc OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fearless View Post
As I understand, the Low Fuel sensor in the tank has a minimal voltage through it all the time. With fuel, that sensor stays cool, but when the fuel level drops it becomes warmer and, through some bit of electrical sorcery, allows enough voltage to light the light. That minimal voltage is enough to light an LED but not an incandescent.

LEDs are polarity sensitive... My guess is if you haven't ever seen it on, you probably got it in backwards, and that could be a worse scenario. At least if its on all the time you know it's not working .....
Given the above, should a normally working low fuel light start out dim and get brighter as the fuel level goes down?

I always get fuel as soon as I see the light on at all and that's been between 250 and 280 KM. I fill to the ring in the filler necks.
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96 XR650L, 96 Guzzi Sport, 07 BMW K1200GT,
86 Husky 400 XCE, 00 Husky Te 610 e, 1999 Husky TC610 SM, 2000 Cagiva GC; Google: TX7
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Old 04-09-2015, 05:30 PM   #14
RayAlazzurra
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My favorite Cagiva

That Gran Canyon fuel pump looks a lot like the Aerovox pump in the 900SS which just happens to be the same as a Ford pickup. (about $80 retail) It can't be the same pump since the Gran Canyon has efi and the 900ss had carbs, but it might be worth searching for cheap substitutes.

My Alazzurra has proven to be fun and reliable. Many parts such as cam belts interchange with other Ducati models. Fork seals are the same as many Huskys, and brakes are good Brembo.

The Alazzurra has one problem area and that is the Bosch BTZ ignition shared with other classic Guzzis and Ducatis. The ignition is easily repaired, but funky ignition has probably sent a few good bikes to the scrapyard.

Cagiva group has made a lot of nice bikes. I don't know much about the Suzuki engine models. The best and most versatile Cagiva ever might just be the Gran Canyon.
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Old 04-10-2015, 07:45 AM   #15
rainmaker8
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rolling chassis for sale

I have a complete Cagiva Gran Canyon frame with title FOR SALE, and all the rest as a rolling chassis to assemble a sweet naked supermoto or custom adventure bike.

I'll update this message later when I find pictures and my complete list.
It has been my intention to build up a project bike since it has a very nice aftermarket rear shock with adjustable height and remote preload. Also swapped front suspension with KTM upside down front forks. Spare front wheel 17" supermoto or original 21" for dirt each with its own brake disc (oversize for supermoto). Brake caliper spacer bracket makes for easy front wheel swaps.
Adjustable rear shock helps balance bike for longer travel, which is what these bikes needed all along.

PM private message me if anybody is interested in taking this off my hands for cheap, before I find the time to finish it?

Now is your chance to build up your own Cagiva without the fussy unobtanium parts that are problemmatic anyway. Source a Ducati motor with the better 900 heads (not the feeble 750 heads on OEM versions) or better yet use my ST2 donor engine with the best cams of the series.
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