ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Thumpers
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-14-2009, 12:36 AM   #31
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Final Prep - Electrical

Final part of the prep puzzle was the electrics, which was taken care of by extraordinary bike electrician Steve Hallam in his secret workshop in South London. Steve is one of these guys that you only ever hear about thru word of mouth, yet his workshop has no fewer than 30 bikes in it, in various stages of electrical rebuild.

Back Street Heroes (UK custom bike magazine) once described him as “the most famous guy you’ve never heard of”. Steve mentioned with irony as I reminded him of that title, that its the spray painters and engine builders who get all the glory and the wow factor with custom bike work or rebuilds, and the bike sparky’s work is all hidden. Steve has done a couple of bikes for me over the years and has rigged up such outlandish ideas as switchable twin ignition systems for Dakar bikes - one magneto and one coil - just in case one system fails.

Steve wired in 5 power sockets (3 DIN and 2 cig lighter), both custom headlights - hi and low beams, rewired the indicators, parking lights, GPS, heated vest and glove circuit, added a new fusebox, and in general tidied up my amateur electrical bodge work. The result is a completed bike.

__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook

Colebatch screwed with this post 11-14-2009 at 05:06 AM
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 01:04 AM   #32
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Luggage

I rode with a Touratech / Kahedo tank bag, a pair of Ortlieb "Bike Packer Plus" Panniers and a Ortlieb XL (89litre) "RackPack" roll bag. Amazingly with that 100% German luggage system, there was not a single aluminium box to be seen!

The verdict?
The tank bag is good. Some zipper problems as the trip wore on and I ended up replacing the zip after about 35,000km. Not 100% waterproof, but waterproof enough that I was happy leaving my camera in there when riding through all day rain. A good bump / vibration absorbant base that similarly allows the SLR camera to sit in there the whole trip without a case. I plan to continue using it.

The back "rackpack" roll bag - this is where Ortlieb are really good. The material they use is really really tough. That bag has not one single hole in it after all the miles. There was battery acid spalishing round there at one point which damaged a lot of the plastic at the back of the bike, but not the ortlieb bag. 50,000km of vibrations on the back of the bike have meant all the powdercoating and painting has rubbed off from the friction between the rack and the roll bag, and the back rack is a polished steel finish now, but no holes have been rubbed in the ortlieb bag. Its tough. Recommended! I will probably use a size smaller next year. This year I needed the big bag as I had to carry a huge tent in it.

Packer plus bicycle panniers - well my early scepticism was right. They did well but ultimately the mounting system that works for push bikes is not suitable for motorcycles. The mounting broke and I ended up reinforcing the mountings with steel and reinforcing the attachment to the rack with hose clamps / jubilee clips. having done that the bags worked well, but could then not easily be removed from the bike. They were attached to the bike semi-permanently. Being a thinner material than the dedicated motorcycle panniers, they also suffered from abrasions and a few holes began appearing after some falls.

After 35,000 km I pensioned them off and replaced them with Ortlieb motorcycle panniers. These were good, well made, strong, and had a theoretically good mounting system (but the straps are too short and need to be extended) ... but the bags are tiny. A bag that can barely take a sleeping bag and a couple of spare parts only is not big enough for this work. A good bag, but too small for the job.

So I am on the look out for better rear bags for next year.
__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook

Colebatch screwed with this post 11-17-2009 at 02:31 AM
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 01:57 AM   #33
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
The End Result









__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 02:49 AM   #34
tserts
Praise San Irritrack
 
tserts's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Location: Yunanistan (Stans baby!)
Oddometer: 2,551
The final photos with the bike where it was meant to be after all these mods puts it in the right perspective...

I kinda lost count, could you give an estimate of the total cost of whole deal? (bike + mods)

What did the sponsors provide and what did they ask in return? (if its not sensitive)

What spare parts and tools did you take on the road?

What did you regret taking/not taking?

I can go on like this but I'll try to stop here...
__________________
BMW F 800 GS 2010 - My Brunhilde
New toys to brake!
Road Rush (Romania, Serbia)
Peloponnese Peninsula on two Africa Twins
9 countries in 15 days - Tserts.eu
tserts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 03:41 AM   #35
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Quote:
Originally Posted by tserts
The final photos with the bike where it was meant to be after all these mods puts it in the right perspective...
Yes I agree . its very easy to get caught up in the modification process as its quite a project in itself, but at the end of the day its just preparation for the real project, which is abusing the thing you have lovingly put together out on the roads in the middle of nowhere.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tserts
What spare parts and tools did you take on the road?
I subscribe to the David Lomax school of tools. Start with a tool kit on the side, work out what tools you need for the bike and take only the fittings that you absolutely know you need. Leave behind spanners, sockets etc that have no application to the bike. Take a minimum of tools, because they are heavy!

I took a 8, 10, 12, 13, 14mm open/ring spanners, same sockets with a small 1/4 inch drive. 10 assorted allen key / screwdriver fittings for the socket kit, one wide adjustable spanner (half the weight of the tool kit), one 26mm socket (BMW wheels), 2 tyre levers, 1 pair long nose pliers, 1 normal type screwdriver (philips + flat), and an assortment of bolts, nuts and washers, M6, M8 and M10.

I didnt take them initially but when I began having some battery problems, I had a set of jumper cables made up for me in Siberia.

Spare parts ... 3 spare oil filters, 2 sets front brake pads, 1 set rear brake pads, clutch cable, epoxy metal putty, fuses, brake lever, clutch lever, 3 front sprockets (1x15t and 2 x 14t), 1 spare (alloy) rear sprocket, 2 sets headset bearings, 4 spare wheel bearings, spare front and rear tube

Quote:
Originally Posted by tserts
What did you regret taking/not taking?
No real regrets on what I took ... maybe the spare rear sprocket. I never used it. The one steel one lasted the whole trip. For long distance travel, steel sprockets rock!

What I wish I also had taken? : Chain breaker, chain master links, spark plug socket, wheel bearing seals, 7mm socket (need that for air box and for a few other odd bits), support van full of swedish masseusettes
__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook

Colebatch screwed with this post 11-14-2009 at 11:16 PM
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 04:38 AM   #36
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Future Mods

What this trip has told me I still need to look into:
- new forks
- low front fender
- positive 12V terminal
- titanium sprockets

Why?
- new forks as the standard ones are (a) basic and (b) of very limited adjustment (c) have crappy valving

- low front fender as (a) its much better cooling for the engine (b) more aerodynamically stable at speed (c) I like the look better

- positive 12V terminal ... for ease of power access for jump starting. The F650GS and Dakar have a terminal under the seat, so all that needs to be done is to take the seat off (useful since the battery needs about 5 panels to be removed to get access). I am thinking of that or maybe even easier access than that, a covered terminal near the voltage regulator perhaps.

- titanium sprockets from here. I like the idea of taking no spare sprockets with me, apart from a change of size front sprocket (I went through 4 front sprockets on this trip).
__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook

Colebatch screwed with this post 08-02-2011 at 03:00 PM
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 05:08 AM   #37
Johnnyboxer
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: Yorkshire, UK
Oddometer: 1,027
One question...................just out of interest?

How did the Dakar fare in the pics, that was right behind you?
__________________
So many roads...........So little time..!!!

2005 BMW R1150GS Adv - Black
2005 BMW R1150GS Adv - Silver
2007 BMW G650 XCountry - Black
Johnnyboxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 05:38 AM   #38
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnyboxer
One question...................just out of interest?

How did the Dakar fare in the pics, that was right behind you?
It suffered. It was hard going for the guy on the Dakar. His bike was 30kgs heavier to start with, then had metal boxes on it rather than soft bags. All up his set up was a good 45kgs more than the X.

On top of that he had a lot less ground clearance. The Dakar got beached quite a few times going thru the bogs and stuff. Engines much the same. The X had modified suspension while the Dakar was stock.

On good fast dirt roads they were both just as good - both very happy cruising all day at 70-75 mph. But when the going got a bit tougher the Dakar suffered from weight, less ground clearance, and stock suspension.

Reliabilty ... same engine pretty much so no differences there. Almost identical fuel consumption every time - as you would expect.

Brakes - the same calipers and pads tho the Dakar did have ABS. no noticeable difference.

Electrical - The Dakar and its 400w generator and larger battery were an advantage over the X ... plenty of power for heated gear etc. Thats what convinced me I needed to steal his generator in the middle of the night.

The X seems to have better wheels. The front hub on the Dakar is very narrow and cant possibly give the rim a huge amount of lateral support. The hubs on the X are wider and stronger than the BMW ones on the Dakar. The Dakar had a lot more bent rims, and a lot more flat tyres for whatever reason than the X did. (and the Dakar effectively only did 2/3 of the miles as the X). In fact the Dakar effectively destroyed two front rims on the trip after countless ding bashings, while for all the talk of the X having chocolate rims, I have had to bash dings out the front rim only twice and they are still fine on the bike now. The rear wheel as well was to the advantage of the X ... its an 18 inch wheel, vs a 17 inch wheel on the Dakar. Not only better in the rough stuff, but in an emergency, there were 18 inch rear tyres in every city we passed through. In an emergency (ripped tyre or something like that) the guy on the Dakar would have had to ship a 17 inch tyre in from Europe.

Its a bit hard to compare too much because the X was modified especially for this trip and the roads it was going to face, while the Dakar was bog stock. But having had a F650GS myself a few years ago, I cant see a huge amount of point it having one over a X ... unless you have short legs. The X is basically same engine, same brakes, same drive, better wheels, all in a 30kg lighter package.

Perhaps if you never wanted to do any mods, and wanted to tour on a stock bike, the Dakar / GS would be better, but change that rear suspension and add some fuel capacity and the X is much better.
__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook

Colebatch screwed with this post 08-02-2011 at 03:05 PM
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 05:56 AM   #39
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Forgot - one ESSENTIAL mod

This was done mid trip when the wheel bearing seals began to seal 'not so well'.

The X has 3 wheel spacers, one either side of the back wheel and one on the left side of the front wheel, that double in purpose as the surface the wheel bearing seals seal against. The problem with these 3 spacers is they are made of aluminium ... nice and light, for sure, but grit in between the spacer and the seal soon grinds a channel in the soft aluminium and the seal then no longer seals. Meaning your wheel bearings are on borrowed time, especially for people who do water crossings!

I had replacement spacers made up from steel in Siberia. The steel is much more durable than the stock alloy, but there is probably a better steel to make them out of than my siberian versions, which are now very rusty!. I will talk with Erik when I get back. He can probably get some super funky ultra hard (yet shiny and pretty) metal to make these out of ... maybe can get him to spin out a dozen of each (all three are different sizes) to sell on ADV rider !!!

If you love your wheel bearings (and travelling without them is rather difficult) then this mod is ESSENTIAL prior to heading off into the unknown.
__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook

Colebatch screwed with this post 08-02-2011 at 03:05 PM
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 06:42 AM   #40
Johnnyboxer
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Oct 2003
Location: Yorkshire, UK
Oddometer: 1,027
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colebatch
It suffered. It was hard going for the guy on the Dakar. His bike was 30kgs heavier to start with, then had metal boxes on it rather than soft bags. All up his set up was a good 45kgs more than the X.

On top of that he had a lot less ground clearance. The Dakar got beached quite a few times going thru the bogs and stuff. Engines much the same. The X had modified suspension while the Dakar was stock.

On good fast dirt roads they were both just as good - both very happy cruising all day at 70-75 mph. But when the going got a bit tougher the Dakar suffered from weight, less ground clearance, and stock suspension.

Reliabilty ... same engine pretty much so no differences there. Almost identical fuel consumption every time - as you would expect.

Brakes - the same calipers and pads tho the Dakar did have ABS. no noticeable difference.

Electrical - The Dakar and its 400w generator and larger battery were an advantage over the X ... plenty of power for heated gear etc. Thats what convinced me I needed to steal his generator in the middle of the night.

The X seems to have better wheels. The front hub on the Dakar is very narrow and cant possibly give the rim a huge amount of lateral support. The hubs on the X I believe are standard Aprilia items, but they are wider and stronger than the BMW ones on the Dakar. The Dakar had a lot more bent rims, and a lot more flat tyres for whatever reason than the X did. (and the Dakar effectively only did 2/3 of the miles as the X). In fact the Dakar effectively destroyed two front rims on the trip after countless ding bashings, while for all the talk of the X having chocolate rims, I have had to bash dings out the front rim only twice and they are still fine on the bike now. I have thought about getting Talon to put together an new front Excel wheel, but it hardly seems justified when I have put the standard wheel thru a lot and its still dancing. The rear wheel as well was to the advantage of the X ... its an 18 inch wheel, vs a 17 inch wheel on the Dakar. Not only better in the rough stuff, but in an emergency, there were 18 inch rear tyres in every city we passed through. In an emergency (ripped tyre or something like that) the guy on the Dakar would have had to ship a 17 inch tyre in from Europe.

Its a bit hard to compare too much because the X was modified especially for this trip and the roads it was going to face, while the Dakar was bog stock. But having had a F650GS myself a few years ago, I cant see a huge amount of point it having one over a X ... unless you have short legs. The X is basically same engine, same brakes, same drive, better wheels, all in a 30kg lighter package.

Perhaps if you never wanted to do any mods, and wanted to tour on a stock bike, the Dakar / GS would be better, but change that rear suspension and add some fuel capacity and the X is much better.

Good call.....................I've had 2 Dakars

But the X is everything that it wasn't....................your mods have solved any deficiencies the X ever had
__________________
So many roads...........So little time..!!!

2005 BMW R1150GS Adv - Black
2005 BMW R1150GS Adv - Silver
2007 BMW G650 XCountry - Black
Johnnyboxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 06:47 AM   #41
ZAPLAJE
Gnarly Adventurer
 
ZAPLAJE's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Chile SA/Miami FL
Oddometer: 281
can you show us a map of your supertrip? I always dream about doing something like you did
__________________
Going UP!!! don't wait for me
ZAPLAJE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 06:56 AM   #42
jack splash
Two Sheds
 
jack splash's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2004
Location: Pt Pleasant, NJ USA
Oddometer: 2,265
Wow!

Hey: This has to be the best thread on this site. IMHO. You really preped your bike right and then had a great trip to follow. I can only dream of a trip like yours. Living in Eastern North America, there's not much real adventure left, except up in Canada and down Mexico. But it still wouldn't come close to the sights and history of your journey.

I'm working on improving my light setup from your post in the X challenge lighting thread, thanks again for the "right info".

I'm really impressed. Great job, keep up the good work and finally, good luck.

Jack
__________________
Stay dirty my friends!
Bigfoot has a picture of me!

www.pinebarrens500.org
www.pinebarrensadventures.com
jack splash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 08:31 AM   #43
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnyboxer
Good call.....................I've had 2 Dakars

But the X is everything that it wasn't....................your mods have solved any deficiencies the X ever had
JB, i reckon if you werent planning on doing any challenging stuff, if you were just riding across Siberia on the Trans-Siberian Highway, a stock Dakar (or 1200 GSA for that matter) would be just fine. For most people, that's going to be enough. But I think what an Adventurised X allows you to do is to be more bold than that. It allows you to look at a map of Siberia or Mongolia, point at somewhere obscure and interesting and say "fuggit, i want to try and go there" and be pretty confident you are going to have fun doing it.

Taking a bigger bike to some of those places turns it in a bit of chore, and takes away a lot of the fun - the whole point of going there in the first place.

I actually picked this bike for this project cause it was the lightest platform I could build a reliable adventure bike out of. I thought about a DRZ, but the lack of top speed and the lack of fuel injection is a bummer when facing low (80) octane fuel and 5000 metre passes. I thought about a 690e, but wasnt as sure I could trust the engine (and other bits) as much as I trust the Rotax.
__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook

Colebatch screwed with this post 08-02-2011 at 03:07 PM
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 08:42 AM   #44
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Quote:
Originally Posted by jack splash
Hey: This has to be the best thread on this site. IMHO. You really preped your bike right and then had a great trip to follow. I can only dream of a trip like yours. Living in Eastern North America, there's not much real adventure left, except up in Canada and down Mexico. But it still wouldn't come close to the sights and history of your journey.

I'm working on improving my light setup from your post in the X challenge lighting thread, thanks again for the "right info".

I'm really impressed. Great job, keep up the good work and finally, good luck.

Jack
Cheers Jack ... Europe is kinda lucky from that perspective. We can go all the way thru Africa, to India, Turkey, Eastern Europe, Siberia etc ... all without flying the bike. The most we need to worry about is a ferry. From an adventure biking perspective it the place to be.

Hell I used to live in Australia ... and you cant ride nowhere there except your own country, without major shipping or flying hassles. so yeah I feel a lot more spoiled now living in Europe.
__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2009, 08:43 AM   #45
Colebatch OP
"Moto Porn"ographer
 
Colebatch's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Schmocation
Oddometer: 3,960
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZAPLAJE
can you show us a map of your supertrip? I always dream about doing something like you did
Try here: http://www.sibirskyextreme.com/trip-data/

or

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=463661
__________________
*** New Sibirsky Extreme Trail DVD Trailer HERE ***
Moroccan Extreme 2011 DVD available HERE
World Motorcycle Altitude Record video HERE
Sibirsky Extreme - The Home of Adventure Motorcycling in Siberia and Mongolia - On Facebook

Colebatch screwed with this post 11-17-2009 at 05:14 AM
Colebatch is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 02:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014