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Old 07-06-2010, 10:57 AM   #136
Tor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducksbane
Having tried it without replacing the oil and with the 10 weight oil, I think you should go the whole hog and do the complete job. Just the spring is better, but the oil makes nearly the same difference again.

I now have the rear progressive spring as well and once again I would like to improve the front without spending a fortune, I would just like it more plush. My main complaint now is on rough bitumen. It seems a lot better offroad and on gravel roads. It seems the opposite of how it came ... too soft off tarmac, but able to absorb almost any bitumen road imperfections ... except when it bounced of little lumps! (It dived too much under brakes as well!)

Anyone experimented with simple things like adding schrader valves on the fork legs so you can remove excess air pressure?
Thanks. Found the install video's and it don't look like a monumental job to get the fork tubes out.
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Old 07-06-2010, 11:20 AM   #137
Bartron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tor
So, what is the scoop on replacing the front springs? Do you have to take the forks completely off the bike, or can you just pop the fork cap off after taking the weight off the front? (If you don't plan on replacing the oil)
Did this just the other week.

Started with the lazy method and had to convert to proper method.

Lazy Method:

1. Take all the weight off the front end
2. Likely have to loosen the handlebar clamps and move the handlebar out of the way
3. Loosen the upper triple clamp bolts
4. Loosen the fork caps
5. Allow the front end to compress all the way to lift the springs and rods with attached caps out of the upper fork tubes. This also makes the fork tube more vertical which helps with oil level determination.


6. Compress the spring by hand a bit to slide the 13mm cone wrench onto the fork cap retainer bolt (you want to slide this right between the plastic and bolt. Trying to get at it through the spring will likely strip the bolt.

7. You can try not to let the dampening rod fall back into the oil or you can let it go and fish for it later. Up to you.
8. Remove the spring without getting dripping fork oil everywhere.
9. Adjust oil level as necessary or siphon out the existing oil and replace, then adjust level.
10. Replace new springs.
11. Reattach and torque the fork caps back on. (Twist the fork caps on till they catch the thread, then insert cone wrench and torque to spec).
12. Raise the front end to get the front wheel off the ground.
13. Put fork caps back on and torque to spec.
14. Torque upper tripple clamps to spec
15. Replace handlebar
16. Put some of that Hyperpro provided grease between the fork seals and the dust seals. Clean things up while you're in there.
17. Go ride and appreciate half the difference you could have had because you didn't change the oil.

The Proper method:

1. Remove front wheel and calipers.
2. Loosen upper triple clamp bolts.
3. Loosen fork caps but don't take them off.
4. While holding on to the fork leg, loosen the lower triple clamp bolts and try not to let the fork leg drop with a thud.
5. Loosen the fork cap completely, watch the spring and fork cap pop out of the upper fork tube as the tube drops over the stanchion. Try not to spill oil.
6. Drain oil into approved container.
7. With your hand, compress the spring a bit to give you room to insert the cone wrench between the plastic bit of the fork cap and the spring. Make sure to engage the nut firmly.
8. Remove the fork cap and set it aside.
9. Remove the old spring.
10. Continue to remove the oil from the fork and watch for the black plastic spacer which will fall out (into your oil dish or onto the ground). Pump the damping rod many times over to get all the oil out of the fork internals.
11. Start to fill with new oil.
12. Pump the damping rod up and down until no more oil 'disappears' from the tube and until no more air bubbles come up. Essentially you are trying to purge the air from the internals and replace it with oil.
13. Drop spacer in and fill oil to desired level. Note: if you lift the fork by the fork tube and the stanchion drops beyond the normal travel (overextended), oil will shoot out spectacularly out of some side holes in the stanchion. DAMHIK.
14. Drop new spring in.
15. Feed the damper rod with black plastic POS up through the spring and lightly screw on fork cap.
16. Compress spring by hand, insert cone wrench as before and tighten to spec.
17. Lift by fork tube until the internals disappear, then tighten the fork cap by hand. Be sure to lubricate the fork cap seal with some good lube (silicone).
18. Put fork tube back in to triple clamp, tighten lower clamps taking care to note the height of the fork cap in the upper triple clamp.
19. Torque fork cap to spec
20. Torque the upper and lower triple clamp to spec.
21. Put some of that Hyperpro provided grease between the fork seals and the dust seals. Clean things up while you're in there.
22. Repeat most of above for the other fork leg.
23. Put brake calipers and wheel back on.
24. Go haul ass and marvel at the difference. Also, remember to put the 6-pack you just went through by the door for the kids who go around collecting bottles for their charities.

Hope this helps. If you are trying to decide which method to go with. I found the Proper method to be way easier than the lazy method. Also, if you try and remove all the fork oil with the lazy method you will fail as there will be about 500cc of fork oil remaining that you missed. I aspirated all the fork oil I could out of the fork using the lazy method and then checked how much more I got after taking the fork leg off the bike - it was substantial.

EDIT: A bunch of people replied while I was writing my essay. Ignore if 205.
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Old 07-06-2010, 12:49 PM   #138
itsatdm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducksbane
Having tried it without replacing the oil and with the 10 weight oil, I think you should go the whole hog and do the complete job. Just the spring is better, but the oil makes nearly the same difference again.

I now have the rear progressive spring as well and once again I would like to improve the front without spending a fortune, I would just like it more plush. My main complaint now is on rough bitumen. It seems a lot better offroad and on gravel roads. It seems the opposite of how it came ... too soft off tarmac, but able to absorb almost any bitumen road imperfections ... except when it bounced of little lumps! (It dived too much under brakes as well!)

Anyone experimented with simple things like adding schrader valves on the fork legs so you can remove excess air pressure?
I had the same experience as you, both before and after the Hyperpro. Graduated to a Bitubo fork insert which improved off road performance but not so much on pavement. Finally I added a 55kg spring to the Bitubo insert. That has been the best of the lot. It is certainly more plush, most notably dealing with the pavement issues. You lose some of the steering sharpness and some dive comes back. Off road, it improved thing also, but I am not sure it is suitable for a heavier rider or one who rides very aggressively, but it works for me. I am using all the travel, without bottoming. Not cheap, but cheaper than a full blown fork mod. I could have saved some bucks going straight to it.
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Old 07-15-2010, 12:33 PM   #139
TierHawg
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How hard is it to install the rear spring? I noticed that a few inmates here have installed their own. I dropped my F800GS at the shop for some warranty work and to install a set of front/rear springs. They keep claiming issues with the rear spring install and they need a special spring compressor.

Is this a hard job?

TierHawg screwed with this post 07-15-2010 at 10:56 PM
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Old 07-15-2010, 01:21 PM   #140
itsatdm
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It is not that hard at all, but I could not find a spring compresser locally that would work. Most automotive compressors are just too thick to fit between the coils. My guess is, that they don't have one that fits. Try a dealer that sells dirt bikes, they should have the right tool. An offroad place could do it with a hydraulic press if they have the right size adapter.
Once located I would take the shock out and reinstall myself or you might end up with the dreaded bent bolt.
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Old 07-17-2010, 11:58 AM   #141
LaPorte
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I installed the Hyperpro 25mm lowering kit and had Phil Douglas (Ater Shock) change the shock spring. Took longer to drive there than for him to change the spring.

Still haven't been out on any rough dirt roads yet to see what is anything the suspension change has done other than to allow me to better reach the ground with my toes. I can now roll the bike backawards while sitting on the seat.

LaPorte
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Old 07-17-2010, 01:37 PM   #142
itsatdm
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Tony, have you done anything to the front? I have a hyperpro front if you are interested.
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Old 07-17-2010, 03:20 PM   #143
TierHawg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LaPorte
I installed the Hyperpro 25mm lowering kit and had Phil Douglas (Ater Shock) change the shock spring. Took longer to drive there than for him to change the spring.

LaPorte
I'm STILL waiting for my bike. I thought this would an easy job too. I've lost pateince with the long wait from the shop.
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Old 07-18-2010, 08:08 AM   #144
LaPorte
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsatdm
Tony, have you done anything to the front? I have a hyperpro front if you are interested.
Gary

I ordered the kit, fork springs and shock spring. Put them in last month.

Tony
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Old 07-18-2010, 05:49 PM   #145
Ducksbane
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Yesterday I actually rode a real off road section with real rocks and I was surprised how good the bike was with the hyperpro progressive springs front and rear. Its still tall, heavy, over geared and has an overly responsive throttle, but I suppose we all knew that.

That being said I would still like a bit more plushness (?) at the front, but short of cartridge or fork internal replacements that doesn't seem likely. I am still tempted to try adding some bleed valves and see what happens.
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Old 01-25-2011, 04:11 PM   #146
tex99999
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7.5 weight oil

OK Inmates,

So many of you guys are using your GS's for heavy off road work and so many have used the 10 weight oil?
I ordered mine with the 7.5 (off road) weight oil, have I done something wrong?
I'm only 170 lbs and I ride either loaded (+100lbs) or off road, usually not together (so far).

Jon

ps I received 2 litres of oil and 2 stickers for front springs only
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Old 01-25-2011, 06:18 PM   #147
DesertStrom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsatdm View Post
It is not that hard at all, but I could not find a spring compresser locally that would work. Most automotive compressors are just too thick to fit between the coils. My guess is, that they don't have one that fits. Try a dealer that sells dirt bikes, they should have the right tool. An offroad place could do it with a hydraulic press if they have the right size adapter.
Once located I would take the shock out and reinstall myself or you might end up with the dreaded bent bolt.
Probably a way you'll never find in a manual, but instead of a spring-compressor, it's possible to use 2 small ratchet-straps to put the spring on tension.

Simply pull the top and the bottom of the spring together. When using 2 straps more or less simultaneously, it's pretty controlled.

I admit releasing the tension is a bit tricky, but it still can be done in a controlled matter.

(Release strap 1 and put a bit of tension back on, release strap 2 and put a bit of tension back on, then back to strap 1 and so on until the spring is back in position)

For sure not the official way, but it saves a trip in search for somebody with a spring-compressor.
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Old 01-25-2011, 08:01 PM   #148
itsatdm
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That was an old post of mine. I just used some angle iron, drilled holes in the end for some long carriage bolts. A couple of hose clamps to keep the angle iron on the spring and viola.
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Old 01-26-2011, 09:35 AM   #149
YetiGS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsatdm View Post
That was an old post of mine. I just used some angle iron, drilled holes in the end for some long carriage bolts. A couple of hose clamps to keep the angle iron on the spring and viola.
I'm lazy, I took mine to the dealer and paid him $25 to do it. (I went and picked up some beer while he was doing it.)
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Old 01-26-2011, 09:43 AM   #150
The Griz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YetiGS View Post
I'm lazy, I took mine to the dealer and paid him $25 to do it. (I went and picked up some beer while he was doing it.)
Me too. I paid a shop $30 to swap springs.
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