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Old 11-24-2009, 07:01 PM   #46
Pedro Navaja OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdedse
...What part of Costa Rica are you from?
Mostly Cartago, but with family just about everywhere.
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Old 11-24-2009, 07:25 PM   #47
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That was cool. I love wineries. You sure do find a lot of little hidden gems south of the border.
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Old 11-24-2009, 08:11 PM   #48
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Pedaling back to town was a challenge. Like I said earlier, it was a gentle slope downhill from town, so one could actually coast to the winery. Getting back to town, especially with all that wine and brandy in me was tough, plus now going slightly uphill. Then I couldn't get the bike into a high enough gear to make the pedaling easier. I was having a hard time finding my way back to the hostal too. I had actually passed it and wound up at the aqueduct that I showed earlier in the thread. Here it is again.



This is kinda funny, but I decided to take a nap on one of the benches. This was great for detoxing from the winery visit. So it was like I was this wine-o sleeping out in a public park. I was probably the only vago in Parras on that day. I think I napped for about 20 minutes. I only woke up because some dog had wandered over and had started barking at me. When I sat up he took off running. I found my way back to the hostal. You can see the bench I used to take a nap in the background of the photo.
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Old 11-25-2009, 09:26 AM   #49
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A ride report about Parras would be incomplete without showing/discussing the Santo Madero chapel. This chapel sits on an extinct volcanic plug. I had pedaled up to it in the morning before touring the rest of the town and the winery. The chapel is dedicated to The Holy Cross. The residents of Parras often make the walk as a good morning exercise.


Here I park the bicycle at the base of the steps that lead up to the chapel.


At the summit.


Viewing the city from the chapel, the two main churches of Parras may be viewed.


And those churches up close. Green trim.


Blue trim.
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Old 11-25-2009, 09:58 AM   #50
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My short tour has now concluded.

Summary

Total mileage: ~1,300 from Houston to Parras de la Fuente.

16 November 2009: Depart Houston arrive Laredo, TX. Overnight at La Posada.
17 November 2009: Depart Laredo, arrive Parras. Walk the town. Overnight at El Farol.
18 November 2009: Tour town and winery/vineyard on bicycle.
Overnight at El Farol.
19 November 2009. Arrive Laredo. Overnight at La Posada.
20 November 2009: Inclement weather keeps me in Laredo. Overnight at La Posada.
21 November 2009: Return to Houston.

Special notes: (1) Banks in Parras are not prepared to exchange dollars for pesos. However, ATM machines abound so get your pesos like that. (2) El Farol did not have a laundry service for guests. (3) No bicycle rentals as a business are to be found in town.

Nice video on Parras.



I have purposely avoided pictures of my motorcycle other than on my departure day. And while Parras may not be on the radar of most US riders, it is certainly on the radar of Mexican riders.



A special thanks to ChangoGS, a Latino-ized Gringo who spent some time in Parras as a kid and got me interested in doing further research. Also a thanks to tricepilot who I suspect is a Latino trapped in Gringo skin. La Posada was a great place to be holed-up during the bad weather. I was able to conduct work via the free PC in their business center, and their bars/restaurants are great places to cut up with others. I had a blast there each night and closed down the bars after a great dinner. So thanks for the recommendation Bob.

Thank you for reading.

Mike
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Old 11-25-2009, 10:48 AM   #51
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Very nice, thanks for taking the time to post it.
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Old 11-25-2009, 11:10 AM   #52
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No te pareces en nada a Maribel
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Old 11-25-2009, 11:14 AM   #53
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Originally Posted by Irak
No te pareces en nada a Maribel
Quieto!
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Old 11-25-2009, 03:56 PM   #54
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A couple of people mentioned stuff like "romance" or "romantic" and it being a good place to take your significant other. So true for Parras de la Fuente. Mexico is really close-by for those of us living in Texas. So if your wife, g/f, b/f, doesn't ride, you can always go by car, or even 1st Class bus.

Here's a song for that type of mood, titled as Romanza or Spanish Romance. The author is unknown but the song is famous and is played everywhere in the Spanish-speaking world. There are lots of different versions of the song out there, and there are many professionals who play it better than amateurs like me. Enjoy it with some wine

Mike
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Old 11-25-2009, 04:26 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedro Navaja
Here's a song for that type of mood, titled as Romanza or Spanish Romance. The author is unknown but the song is famous and is played everywhere in the Spanish-speaking world. There are lots of different versions of the song out there, and there are many professionals who play it better than amateurs like me. Enjoy it with some wine http://soundclick.com/share?songid=8395264

Mike
Love the traditional songs throughout Mexico/CA, and the many variations that you hear repeated, over and over. You play well, and must make lots of friends via music south of the border. Gracias para tu reporte.
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Escape the Tundra: Tenth winter in Mexico and Guatemala 2009/2010
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Old 11-25-2009, 05:06 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Eduardo
Love the traditional songs throughout Mexico/CA, and the many variations that you hear repeated, over and over. You play well, and must make lots of friends via music south of the border. Gracias para tu reporte.
Can't carry a guitar on the bike, but I generally will have a headstock tuner and capo with me. There's always a guitar laying around somewhere. One thing I miss from my younger days living down there are the parties. Somebody always had a guitar and people would sing and dance at these parties. Poetry being recited in cafes, restaurants and bars is another thing I miss. In fact the first place I heard the poets was not in Costa Rica, but in Guatemala. I somehow think it has been dying out.
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Old 11-25-2009, 05:55 PM   #57
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Great Report.

Some reports need to depend heavily on pictures and some just need the addition of a few, I like the flavor of you report!

Kevin
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Old 11-25-2009, 08:29 PM   #58
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Bravo Pedro,

I enjoyed the historical and wine aspects of your RR.

Jim in Tejas
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Old 11-26-2009, 03:44 AM   #59
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Very nice. I need to point my friends who say I will be killed or kidnapped in Mexico to this report.

John
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Old 11-26-2009, 06:12 AM   #60
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Very nice. I need to point my friends who say I will be killed or kidnapped in Mexico to this report.

John
Thanks. Yes there are a lot of misconceptions with regards to solo travel, or even group travel, in Mexico. Like traveling anywhere, common sense should govern. From the several ride reports you can see that there is quite a bit of myth-busting that ADVrider provides to the potential explorer of Mexico. I think what happens in general, however, is that bad incidents get passed around more than the pleasant incidents, hence the reputation grows that the travel into Mexico is unsafe. Language barriers, unfortunately, usually bring instant mistrust.

In my case, I perceive that there is more aggression directed against the rider here in the US, than what there is south of the border, both on and off the road.
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