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Old 09-14-2004, 02:06 PM   #1
scottabshire OP
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MotoMan Break In Procedure???

Have any of you tried this?
Is it recommended?
http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/
I did this with my FJR1300 and it seemed to work fine - of course I probably need to keep a bike for more than 6 months to find out...
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Old 09-14-2004, 02:25 PM   #2
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Motoman

oops, this is the real link...
http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
but the other one has good stuff too...
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Old 09-14-2004, 02:42 PM   #3
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Ugh, not this guy again. Before others chime in with the pros and cons of his method, and there are some here that are very knowledgeable about this subject, all I have to say is Yamaha ( KTM, Honda or whoever built the bike in question) built the thing and they've gone over everything that can potentially go wrong with it so I'd take their break-in procedure that is designed to guarantee the life of the motor over a guy that claims to have worked with race teams. Race teams that allow for an engine tear down ever race or every few races, certainly more than you ever will want to be involved in. He focuses on peak hp/torque not engine longevity. Personally motorcycle motors make more than enough power for any average rider to use so I doubt a big hp gain will be realized following his method. If it was so proven why doesn't any motorcycle manufacturer recommend it, because it doesn't promote engine life. Finally I'll always take the opinion of a factory that puts corporate pride and image into a product and therefore at risk with everything they put in their owners manual over a guy with delusions of grandeur who calls himself da da da daaa, Motoman.
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Old 09-14-2004, 03:37 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SQD8R
Yamaha ( KTM, Honda or whoever built the bike in question) built the thing and they've gone over everything that can potentially go wrong with it so I'd take their break-in procedure that is designed to guarantee the life of the motor over a guy that claims to have worked with race teams
If I remember correctly, not having my manual in front of me, KTM (as do the other manufacturers) recommends maximum RPM during breakin, without specifying what you do to achieve that RPM. What you want to avoid is constant RPM's. Don't get on the highway and drone along at 5000 RPM's, for example. Thus backroad riding, up and down hills, and around curves, is better for breakin that highway slab touring. As if you didn't know that :-).
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Old 09-14-2004, 04:18 PM   #5
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KTM does not recommend max RPM during break in on the 950. They have limits per miles on the engine up until a specific mileage.
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Old 09-14-2004, 06:08 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Goss
KTM does not recommend max RPM during break in on the 950. They have limits per miles on the engine up until a specific mileage.
Sorry, what I meant by "maximum RPM" was "RPM one should not exceed". To be specific, the manual specs 6500 RPM's as max for the first 620 miles (1000km).
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Old 09-14-2004, 06:37 PM   #7
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Maximum RPM's as you prescribed

Ok, I ran the bike full throttle all the way home as you suggested...
Just kidding... The bike is WONDERFUL! Scott A
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Old 09-14-2004, 08:01 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SQD8R
Ugh, not this guy again. Before others chime in with the pros and cons of his method, and there are some here that are very knowledgeable about this subject, all I have to say is Yamaha ( KTM, Honda or whoever built the bike in question) built the thing and they've gone over everything that can potentially go wrong with it so I'd take their break-in procedure that is designed to guarantee the life of the motor over a guy that claims to have worked with race teams. Race teams that allow for an engine tear down ever race or every few races, certainly more than you ever will want to be involved in. He focuses on peak hp/torque not engine longevity. Personally motorcycle motors make more than enough power for any average rider to use so I doubt a big hp gain will be realized following his method. If it was so proven why doesn't any motorcycle manufacturer recommend it, because it doesn't promote engine life. Finally I'll always take the opinion of a factory that puts corporate pride and image into a product and therefore at risk with everything they put in their owners manual over a guy with delusions of grandeur who calls himself da da da daaa, Motoman.
The point of Motoman's method is to properly seat the rings which can increase horsepower but can also reduce oil consumption. Reducing oil consumption should be near and dear to the owner of every BMW twin.

A huge mark against the typical OEM break-in directions is that they direct you to change the oil at 600 miles. When I bought my KTM 950, I changed the oil after the first ride of about 40 miles and found this:



The oil itself had a huge amount of metal particles swimming in it. I'm really, really glad I changed it early because a lot of that crap would get circulated through the engine and might weld itself to anything that had metal-to-metal contact.

Say what you want about Motoman, but the typical OEM break-in instruction is at best a compromise that tries to satisfy the needs of the machine, lawyers and customer all at once.
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Old 09-14-2004, 09:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turkish
the typical OEM break-in instruction is at best a compromise that tries to satisfy the needs of the machine, lawyers and customer all at once.
Agreed. 1k mile valve adjustment would make more sense and a 100 mile fluids and filters change would make more sense ...but the average buyer would equate shorter initial maint intervals w/ their wallet first and poor design second.
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Old 09-15-2004, 05:19 AM   #10
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I've done MotoMan's breakin for every motor that I got new or had to rebuild:
Kawasaki 1998 ZX-9R
4 Suzuki 97/98 GSX-R600 engines (race engines)
KTM 98 GS-400 LC/4 (got this one with a stripped engine)
KTM 2003 640 Adventure
Yamaha 93 XT-600E (bought this one 3 month's ago with huge oil consuption).

All engines perform(ed) very good, no oil consumption, no oil polution (oil stays clear for very long).

They key point in MotoMan's method is that the rings must properly be seated against the cilinderwall and that can only be acomplished using full throttle at medium revs to get the maximum combustion chamber pressure. You only have 200 to 400 miles to do this, after that the cilinderwall/piston rings don't bed in anymore.
Do not exceed the maximum recommended revs because the main bearings are still a bit tight.

And why isn't that in the manufacturers manual? Because they can't say that you must ride with full throttle, that gives al sorts of legal problems.

What I do with a new engine; warm it up by riding slowly. When the oil is warmed up then start accelarating full throttle from 25% revs to 75% revs for 20 times in second or third gear. Let it cool down. And then repeat this 2 times.
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Old 09-15-2004, 06:16 AM   #11
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Fair arguements but I just don't think (a) anyone keeps their bikes long enough to notice the difference (b) anyone has done a side by side comparison, independently, to validate these test results (c) no one is using the hp gained through this procedure especially on an adventure bike or full on sport bike (d) oil consumption, excluding BMW's, on the majority of bikes these days is minimal @ best even using the manufacturers method.

Why I say this ... what is the mileage on your bikes compared to bikes that have had the regular break-in procedure done. Have they let you down in hp or oil consumption? I'd love to see real number comparisons that show this gain in hp and savings in oil. I've done the factory break-ins on all of my new bikes and have always hit the hp ratings of the bikes and never experienced oil consumption. Personally I've found the best method to be a trackday where you are going up and down the rev range and nowhere near peak hp.

Anyway I'm just expressing an opinion and I know some subscribe to his methods and that is understandable sincei t is your bike you are doing it to. Enjoy your ride.
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Old 09-15-2004, 06:38 AM   #12
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"hp gained"
For street oriented machines the hp gained is not imported. The fact that the piston rings are well seated means that the oil gets less polluted with combustion debris. So it performes better for a longer period.

Damage to engines comes from cold starts, not from running them at the correct oil temperature. So after startup you must keep on driving................
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Old 09-15-2004, 06:47 AM   #13
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"Have they let you down in hp or oil consumption? I'd love to see real number comparisons that show this gain in hp and savings in oil."

My ZX-9R had an, according to the dynojet operator, an incredable 147 rwhp on the dynojet (with full akrapovix system). I sold the thing with 26000 miles on it in prefect working order.
My tuned 98 model GSX-R600's where the fastest bikes on the track last year between, also tuned, 2003 supersport machines. The oil comes out after every 6 sessions (25 minutes each) the same color it went in.
The KTM dealer that serviced my 640 Adv last week asked if the bike was tuned when I picked it up. No sir, just the carb and airbox mod that everybody does. 4000 miles on it now.

This empherical data does not prove a thing, but I'm happy with it.
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Old 09-15-2004, 06:52 AM   #14
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O, I forgot, my girlfriends "98 ZX-6R. Same method. That thing runs 290 km/h = 180 m/h on the clock, blinding fast. Completely stock. Absolutely no oil consumption.
28000 km = 17400 miles on the clock.
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Old 09-15-2004, 07:07 AM   #15
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I can't believe this debate is back again...yesshhh

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