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Old 03-31-2014, 08:54 PM   #1
GREWUPIN_D11 OP
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F800GS radiator upper bracket replacement

My 2010 F800GS has endured various drops and slams on paved and unpaved, and rock-strewn surfaces over the past 4 years, and at some point one or more of these caused the right-hand side of the radiator upper bracket to break off, and left side grommet-holding bracket that bolts to the frame to break. Itís noteworthy that after all these, the bike was still rideable, with no coolant leaks. Application of a few zip ties would have created a fix that could have endured for many more hours of off-road shenanigans, or many thousands of miles on the highway.
I was able to replace the bracket without disturbing the coolant pressure boundary, leaving all hoses connected to both the radiator and the engine.
Acquired the BMW radiator repair kit, listed below.
Replacement part
18
17 11 7709754
Repair kit for radiator bracket
1
$25.84


The bracket is installed with 7 pop rivets. The kit I received came with 8 replacements, which was nice.
Clear away the side panels, front beak, radiator cover, the two upper grommet-holding brackets that engage with the radiator bracket, fastened to the frame by two bolts that also secure the front panel carrier. Goal is to have the radiator supported primarily by the hoses on the left side, so you can move it in various directions as necessary to get access to the pop rivets with a drill, or whatever tool youíre using to remove rivet heads. Leave the lower left grommet-holding bracket installed as a place to prop the radiator when youíre not working on it.

The electrical plug for the fan, mounted on top of the radiator bracket, can be disengaged using a small screw driver to move the small catch visible from the front, below the plug, to the right side of the bike (move it left as your looking at it from the front) and sliding the whole plug and carrier to which itís attached to the rear.

The fan is secured to the radiator bracket by two body and fender-type fasteners, which can be unlocked by prying the large head out about ľ inch using a good-sized screw driver. Remove the fan, lay aside.

Moving the radiator only as much as necessary, drill off the heads of the 7 original rivets. With a drill, use light pressure, fairly high speed. The rivets are aluminum, so goes quick. If a rivet starts spinning before you drill the head off, donít worry too much, go to the next one Pry the rivet heads off using a knife blade, putty knife, sharpened screwdriver or something similar.
In hindsight, a Dremel tool with a grinding wheel might have been a better option. But I didnít have one, so went with tools on hand.

CAREFULLY pull the bracket off the rivet stumps. The metal strip that forms the top of the radiator is VERY SOFT. If you pry between the bracket and the top of the rad with a screwdriver, good chance youíll dent or bend this metal strip. DAMHIK.
Trim the rivet stumps flush with the top of the radiator. Goal here is to minimize the amount of left-over rivet that must be dealt with to make room for the new rivet. If you have a Dremel, this would be a good place to use it with a cut-off abrasive disk. I used a pair of flush-cutting nippers that very easily trimmed these aluminum rivet shanks.
With all the rivets trimmed, use a small screw driver or 1/8 pin punch to PUSH (not hammer) the old rivet down into the space between the top metal strip, and the flat coolant tube about ľ inch below it. Now pick front or back, (I used the back), and using small screwdriver, ruin a fin or two to reach in and move each rivet remnant away from its hole in the top strip of the radiator, just far enough to allow insertion of a new rivet. You will be deforming fins to make this happen. Youíll have achieved success when you can insert a new rivet thereís about 1/8 inch of clearance between the top of the radiator and the rivet head.



Before fitting the new bracket, place a new rivet in the left-most hole on the bracket, and see if you can get your rivet tool properly in place on this rivet. I bet you canít. My choice was to trim away the top horizontal flange on that interferes with placement of the rivet tool. My original bracket showed evidence of having been hand-modified also, probably be some irate assembler who was cursing the engineer that didnít properly consider how that rivet was going to be pulled during installation.
Area that I trimmed away is visible below:

Fit the bracket, place the rivets, and set them with your rivet tool. Note these are metric rivets, 4mm, which is halfway between US-standard sizes of 1/8 and 3/16 inch. Use the 3/16 nosepiece on your tool. This leaves a slight raised area around the hole in the center of the head, which you can see on my handiwork above. I don't think this affects strength.
Fasten the fan in place, re-connect wiring, reassemble the various plastic body parts. Done!
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Old 03-31-2014, 09:55 PM   #2
sorebutt
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Can I assume you don't have crash bars? They can save a lot of work and money
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Old 03-31-2014, 10:44 PM   #3
Mr B
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Nice job, I went though the same thing about three years ago, but I ended up replacing the entire radiator. I punched a hole it mine!!! Brilliant!!!!



Discovered that ordering the entire radiator you get the bits that are included with the repair kit,......of course not knowing this at the time, and no one at BMW letting me know otherwise, I ordered BOTH.... GENUIS!!!!!!


NICE JOB
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Old 04-01-2014, 07:42 AM   #4
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Mine was damaged in '09 and remained with zip ties thru extra holes drilled in the plastic for 30K miles until a rock punctured a tube. I repaired it like this finally. The repair kits only came out a few years ago so a new rad was the only option then. Ya right. New rad every time you fall.
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Old 04-02-2014, 09:13 AM   #5
GREWUPIN_D11 OP
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The utility of crash bars

Check the linked video from 4:00 to 4:03 for an approximation of the sequence of events leading to the damage which prompted me to undertake repairs to the mighty F800GS. My initial speed ~50 mph, unpaved sand road, wide-radius curve to the left.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=642714635777987

Except in my case, impact included to the top edge of the right side panel/snorkel cover, in addition to windshield and instrument cluster.

Crash bars would have been ineffective.
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Old 04-02-2014, 09:22 AM   #6
Loutre
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GREWUPIN_D11 View Post
Check the linked video from 4:00 to 4:03 for an approximation of the sequence of events leading to the damage which prompted me to undertake repairs to the mighty F800GS. My initial speed ~50 mph, unpaved sand road, wide-radius curve to the left.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=642714635777987

Except in my case, impact included to the top edge of the right side panel/snorkel cover, in addition to windshield and instrument cluster.

Crash bars would have been ineffective.
a scooter is not a GS
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Old 09-17-2014, 10:50 PM   #7
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I broke my L upper mount three weeks ago, along with my clavicle & 2 ribs. Crash bars do not always save the day. I went down hard on a gravel road and my Altrider crash bars (lower & upper bars) held up really well, but just the smack down itself was enough to bust the mounting peg loose from the radiator.

Great write up, Thanks
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Old 09-18-2014, 01:44 PM   #8
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On closer inspection, I discovered that I also broke the bottom right portion of the radiator that mounts to the support bracket. Even if I buy the kit, I'm still lacking the bottom right as it snapped off from the radiator itself. Any suggestions? It seems like a really weak design. Thanks
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Old 09-18-2014, 04:44 PM   #9
machinebuilder
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There's a thread here somewhere where I fabbed a repair for mine.

I'm not near a computer so I can't find it for you.

I agree it's a poor mount design. I think the bottom left broke on mine first, then when I had a very hard drop the rest broke
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Old 09-19-2014, 03:43 AM   #10
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I found my previous thread

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=974095
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Old 09-21-2014, 04:07 PM   #11
SubAtomicGenius
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Just installed the Touratech hard part bracket today.
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'14 F800GS Cordoba Blue - ABS, ESA, ASC, Low Seat, Cen. Stand
Touratech Lower/Upper Crashbars, Skidplate, Adj. /Folding Clutch and Brake Levers (black) - Barkbusters VPS Handguards - SW Motech Rear Frame Sliders and Chain Guard - Pivot Pegs - Bestrest Shock Bolt Support with Upper Bolt - Accelerator Module - Nautilus Air Horn - 12VDC Display
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