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Old 02-04-2010, 05:03 PM   #61
mag00
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Mine showed up today as well, nicely made product. should get it on tomorrow.
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Old 02-04-2010, 11:37 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by never mind
Y'all are a lot braver than I, drilling holes in your airbox! I hope Jens will comment if that is really necessary!
He already has. Read back from your post a page or two.
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Old 02-05-2010, 06:39 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyhawk99
He already has. Read back from your post a page or two.
I see it now. Maybe it's just me, but I'm still not drilling any holes in my airbox. FWIW, the AIT sensor on the 08 r1200gs is mounted in the airbox directly in back of the air filter. Outside air enters the intake snorkel, goes over the filter and hits the sensor. It was entirely by accident, but my BP NTC wound up in almost the exact same location as the snorkel intake, only on the other side of the fuel tank.
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Old 02-05-2010, 08:15 AM   #64
jenslh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by never mind
I see it now. Maybe it's just me, but I'm still not drilling any holes in my airbox. FWIW, the AIT sensor on the 08 r1200gs is mounted in the airbox directly in back of the air filter. Outside air enters the intake snorkel, goes over the filter and hits the sensor. It was entirely by accident, but my BP NTC wound up in almost the exact same location as the snorkel intake, only on the other side of the fuel tank.
No worries - The position where you installed the sensor is just perfect.

The two sensors will measure excactly (or very, very close to) the same temperature , so the BoosterPlug will perform as promised.

I guess I'm like you - I'll never ride my bike without the BoosterPlug, but I'm still not drilling the Air box

Cheers

/Jens
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Old 02-05-2010, 09:08 AM   #65
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My first ride with BoosterPlug. Great; doing all the stuff Jens claims. Smoother throttle response, no jerks, acceleration may be quicker and at start-up fired immediately, no turning over 2 to 4 seconds before running.
40 miles in 36 to 43 degrees.
I am sold. If you do not have a BoosterPlug get one.
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Old 02-05-2010, 10:44 AM   #66
jantarek
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just got mine in today , but unfortunately in need to wait few weeks to try it out, it will go on 2003 1150gsa



thanks Jens
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Old 02-05-2010, 12:10 PM   #67
laterider
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Sorry, no pictures

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrzej
If anyone has any photos of the install, those would be appreciated.

A.
The post title says it all. Here is a description of what I did.

The designer/manufacturer of the Booster Plug thought this procedure would work well but he does not include it in the instructions on his website because some people may not be willing to drill the air box.

I removed all the bike fairings and other stuff required to remove the fuel tank. This includes, in order, rear seat, front seat, left and right front side fairings, battery cover, left and right tank covers, and top tank cover.

I also removed the battery restraint bar and the battery. I found that removal of these two items allowed more room for gas tank removal. This is my preference but maybe not what’s in the manual.

I then removed the air intake tube on the right side of the bike that leads to the air box and contains the air filter.

I then disconnected the overflow tube on top of the fuel tank, and removed the fuel tank (nearly empty to reduce weight) and disconnected the two electrical connections on the front of the fuel tank, and the fuel tank quick connect on the front of the fuel tank. I did NOT disconnect the outflow on the bottom of the fuel tank. There was enough slack in the tube to lift the fuel tank out of the way and rest it on a 24" stool on the left side of the bike.

I removed the FRK that I had earlier installed and clipped in the new BoosterPlug. I routed the NTC lead around the right side of the air box without zip-tying it in place. I picked a flat spot on the upper right side of the air box, just aft of air filter.

I stuffed a clean rag into the air box to catch any drilling debris adn keep it out of the down draft paths to the cylinder intake.

I used a 3/64th inch bit to gently drill a pilot hole into the airbox on the flat spot I had selected. I then used a 6mm bit to enlarge the pilot hole to 6mm. I used a small rat tail file to gently oversize the hole - making sure that the rag was catching all the debris.

I lubricated (very lightly with KY jelly) the NTC probe and slid it into the hole and continued until the probe was fully into the air box - then pushed 1/2" of NTC lead into the air box. I cleaned the probe gently with WD40 on the clean rag.

I put a zip tie on the lead tight against the outside of the airbox. I used a high temp silicon gasket maker material to seal the hole around the lead and as a way to stabilize the NTC in the air box. The lead and NTC are light weight and relatively stiff so I'm not worried about using such a method for stability.

I then zip tied the NTC lead, there was plenty of slack, at convenient places to keep it as snug as possible against the air box for reassembly.

Lastly, I reinstalled the air inlet tube, the fuel tank including the hookups, all the fairings and seats.

That's it. Works great.
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Old 02-06-2010, 12:34 PM   #68
mikegc
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Booster Plug

I received my Booster Plug yesterday and did the installation today. On my ’09 GSA, I just removed the covers and the left side, located the AIT, did the disconnect and hooked up the Booster Plug. The NTC sensor wire was fished up the left side of the bike and zip-tied to existing wires close to the triple tree.

I started the bike and immediately rode it up my driveway and it accelerated flawlessly. Before the installation, the bike would “stutter” just a little. Hard acceleration seems to be smoother, too.

Mike
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Old 02-08-2010, 03:14 AM   #69
jenslh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hammick
I installed mine yesterday on my '09 GSA. Install took about 10 minutes. Very easy. My temp probe routes along side the left of the tank, over the fuel pump lines and then is zip tied to the left of the forks in open air. I can see it when I am riding but you can't see it if you are off the bike.

I did about a 20 mile test ride. Outside temp was about 40 degrees. Things have smoothed out at lower speeds. Added a good amount of low end grunt. Wide open acceleration from 1st through 3rd seems greatly improved.

This may be in my head but it actually seems to idle better.

I am very happy with the product. Some much that I have ordered two more of them for my other bikes.

Great job and product Jens!
Thanks Hammick :-)

I dont claim that the BoosterPlug will improve idle........ but there May be a positive effect in this area too ("May be" is highlighted because I'm just thinking loud here)

See - if your bike tends to "stumble" when idling, the change in RPM's may be big enough to make the CPU injection map shift to another cell. This change will make the bike go temporary "open loop", and the enrichment from the BoosterPlug kicks in. The extra fuel will help the lean running bike to stabilize idle RPM.

The "R" bikes are better suited for lean idle conditions, as the rotating mass (flywheel) is bigger on these bikes, so on a Boxer you will probably not notice any difference in idle running. But on the "K" og "F" bikes with very little flywheel effect,you may see an improvenemt in this field too.

As mentioned earlier, I'm just thinking loud here and not making promises. But I'll test it on my own bike as soon as I can make the snow in Denmark go away and increase outside temperature to a decent level

/Jens

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Old 02-08-2010, 05:59 AM   #70
mag00
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Hooked mine up yesterday and it does idle smoother and at slow speed it is as well.
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Old 02-08-2010, 12:24 PM   #71
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installed mine yesterday>>>>>>>magic ++

thanks Jen, nice addition, you'll do well

I positionned the temp probe on the r side , and posterior to the tank, oriented to the rear, zip-tied to the frame, under my thigh

Am I the onlyone oriented to the rear??
i suddenly feel isolated or is it just marginal...

does it need more ventilation? i understand that temp on probe has to be similar to the airbox..

anyway, looked it easy to attach there so there it went...
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Old 02-08-2010, 01:10 PM   #72
jenslh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alainmax
installed mine yesterday>>>>>>>magic ++

thanks Jen, nice addition, you'll do well

I positionned the temp probe on the r side , and posterior to the tank, oriented to the rear, zip-tied to the frame, under my thigh

Am I the onlyone oriented to the rear??
i suddenly feel isolated or is it just marginal...

does it need more ventilation? i understand that temp on probe has to be similar to the airbox..

anyway, looked it easy to attach there so there it went...
Nope - you're not alone

I know of a few GS owners that installed the sensor under the seat with good results.

The boxers carry the hottest engine parts very low, and especially the GS models have plenty of air flowing under the seat, so I dont expect any problems with this setup.

I would'nt recommend it on a watercooled bike with a high radiator though (As the K series)

Cheers

/Jens
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Old 02-08-2010, 01:44 PM   #73
JStancampiano
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Installed mine today and bike seems to start in the cold (27deg F) without any additional throttle (before I had to add 1/4 turn). Bike runs good. I put the sensor up front by the fuel pump cover, but I think this place will get hot air from oil cooler in the summer. Now that I am sure it works, I will move it the intake horn.

Joe
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Old 02-08-2010, 05:52 PM   #74
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Dyno results?

Has anyone other than the manufacturer done any before and after dynamometer runs? Objective testing?
Considering ordering one based on reading this thread. Better drivability seems to be what we're after. But, a dyno chart might be interesting.

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Old 02-09-2010, 09:20 AM   #75
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Udo; read Jens Lyck's website http://www.boosterplug.com/index.html and you will understand. Bike is nice and smooth, acceleration feels better (faster maybe) and start up is faster on my bike. BoosterPlug works. If you are after high dyno numbers there is lots of other stuff you can use. If you are after a smooth and really nice bike to ride try BoosterPlug.
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