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Old 04-28-2010, 04:46 PM   #31
johngil
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Old 04-28-2010, 04:50 PM   #32
LukasM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by upweekis
I read somewhere that a guy is making a new throttle roller(gear, whatever the part is on the handlebar grip) that is cammed, so that at less than 1/3 throttle, it moves slower, and then picks up to normal after that. I think that would cure a lot of off-road problems. Of course, I can't find it now...

Do you mean G2 Ergonomics? They make some nice stuff, I am using their changeable cam system on my KTM.

http://g2ergo.com/index.html
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Old 04-28-2010, 04:58 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by upweekis
I read somewhere that a guy is making a new throttle roller(gear, whatever the part is on the handlebar grip) that is cammed, so that at less than 1/3 throttle, it moves slower, and then picks up to normal after that. I think that would cure a lot of off-road problems. Of course, I can't find it now...
Like Lukas said, it's a G2 Throttle Tamer. I installed one on my bike and wrote it up HERE. Sam at G2 is a great guy too. It doesn't toally fix the problem, it's still a bit jerky right off idle, but it is much more controllable once you've got the throttle open.
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Old 04-28-2010, 05:05 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM
Way too much editing of your posts going on Griz...


It's not the first time.
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Old 04-28-2010, 05:16 PM   #35
upweekis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YetiGS
Like Lukas said, it's a G2 Throttle Tamer. I installed one on my bike and wrote it up HERE. Sam at G2 is a great guy too. It doesn't toally fix the problem, it's still a bit jerky right off idle, but it is much more controllable once you've got the throttle open.
Yep! that's it.
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Old 04-28-2010, 05:38 PM   #36
JoelWisman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsatdm
Sounds like this is the reason for the the slight stumble, when slowly trying to ease over things just off idle. If it is, than doesn't sound like there is much that can be done about it.
(quoting what I said about no fuel adaption at idle)

actually what I said was much to simplified.

There are three types of adaption, "additive", "multiplicative" and "extrapolated".

Addative adaption occurs on the fly as soon as the engine is warm. The F800GS uses a standard narrow band slow oxygen sensor and it is too far back in the exhaust to be useful without causing idle to hunt and peck all over the place. Addative adaption occurs once the sensor is warm at just above idle all the way to just short of wide open throttle (wot).

Multiplicicative adaption occurs over time and is remembered and incorporated as a conversion factor of the base fuel map. Multiplicitave is remembered from start up cycle to start up cycle and changes slowly over miles and large fractions of an hour of running.

The F800GS does use multiplicative adaption for idle fuel mix as well as part throttle fuel mix.

Lastly there is extrapolated adaption. The F800GS's O2 sensor is not capable of measuring fuel mixtures that are significantly different then lambda, and yet for a variaty of reasons INCLUDING emissions you want a pretty rich mixture at WOT. As such, the F800GS engine management computer enriches the mixture at near full throttle through WOT by a certain percent. This enrichment is based on the modified multiplicitive fuel map and is therefore called extropolated adaption.

The idle fuel mix is adapted but not well, it takes it some time to be optimal when the energy or oxidizer content of fuel changes. When I have gone from oxygenated to unoxygenated fuel it took about 20 minutes for the o2 sensor to start crossing.

The real reason for jerky transitions from idle is a lack of acurate sensors such as an air mass sensor or at least MAP sensor and the fact that BMW has so far failed or does not wish to damp this transition with industry techniques.

My guess is that the snapy throttle sells bikes after a test ride to typical F800GS customer, even though it is sub optimal off road in technical stuff.

As for stumbles going from part throttle to idle. This shouldn't happen if everything has had time to adapt to fuel and conditions but does on some bikes and I have no idea why.
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Old 04-28-2010, 06:54 PM   #37
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God Joel... I love that kind of talk.
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Old 04-28-2010, 08:16 PM   #38
The Griz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM
So you tuned your KLR with the G2 gauge then? Did you do it on a dyno? Any graphs?
No need for a dyno. I read the meter while riding under actual conditions. I adjusted fuel air mixture with needle size and jet sizes until I was sitting at 14:1 on the meter. 14:1 felt and worked the best for economy and power. IMHO, a fuel/air mixture gauge is far more accurate than a dyno. Dyno's and charts aren't realistic. I want to set up the fuel/air mixture while riding under loads and conditions that I will likely encounter during use. Not in a lab on a treadmill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM
Whether 14.7 is completely safe depends on a multitude of factors, for example the compression ratio, fuel octane, ignition timing, induction type, etc. I would like to see you run a high compression drag racing engine or even a low compression one with 20 lbs of boost at your "completely safe" 14.7:1 on standard gas. You'd be picking up your pistons in pieces.
Exactly what I said earlier. Repeat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM
In case of a stock F800GS, this is unlikely to be an issue. But then again, if you were going to reprogram your EFI to compensate for the free flowing exhaust, air filter, etc why not make it optimal instead of just safe? You know, like, rich at full load and lean for cruising? More power and still get better mileage?
Agreed. Optimal and safe sometimes fall at the same ratio though.
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The Griz screwed with this post 04-29-2010 at 09:29 AM Reason: Removed most of the head explody. Kept tuning info.
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Old 04-29-2010, 02:16 AM   #39
martinbywater
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ref tuning

Hi, a few have mentioned the vibration at 80mph, I have used a larger front sprocket ie 17th, available from touratech and others, makes it far more comfortable for fast touring, did also try the smaller rear sprocket ie 41th, this made 5th gear identical to 6th prev, but I felt too highly geared to me, but gives in effect a 6th gear overdrive.

I would highly reccomend the 17th front for touring, goes on easily with the std chain lenght.
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Old 04-29-2010, 02:42 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Griz
How's about don't bitch about the functionality of a web forum. The tools are there for a reason: to make corrections and add things as needed. Maybe you and Booni should just wait a bit before replying instead of being all white on rice with the reply and complaining about someone using the tools provided.

No need for a dyno. I read the meter while riding under actual conditions. I adjusted fuel air mixture with needle size and jet sizes until I was sitting at 14:1 on the meter. 14:1 felt and worked the best for economy and power. IMHO, a fuel/air mixture gauge is far more accurate than a dyno. Dyno's and charts aren't realistic. I want to set up the fuel/air mixture while riding under loads and conditions that I will likely encounter during use. Not in a lab on a treadmill.

I never claimed I'm extremely "versed" on the topic. I simply have experience with it. You're the one who calling people "clueless". I'm just stating the facts and my experience.

Exactly what I said earlier. Repeat.

Agreed. Optimal and safe sometimes fall at the same ratio though.

Anyway, enough of this. Truce my friend.
Your offer for truce is nice, but that's not how discussions work. I am not attacking you personally (well, maybe poking fun a little bit ) but mostly addressing the incorrect information that you are posting. If anything I am saying is wrong I would be glad to have it pointed out to me so I can learn something, too. But if you keep posting bullshit, I'll keep calling you on it.

As for the editing function on ADV - this can be both a blessing and a curse, which is why you will see many forums that don't have it or at least put a time limit on it. It can be very useful if you realize too late that you made an honest mistake, like posting a wrong part number or torque value, and don't want to mislead people. Or maybe just to correct a spelling mistake. But even if "the tools are provided" you should have the integrity to stand by what you said and not go back 5 times and change things as the discussion goes on. Simply make a new post for new information, or if you really must, make an editing comment on the bottom of your old post to clarify what you meant. This is the only way people will be able to keep track of who said what. Then again, can Booni and I really expect you to actually THINK BEFORE YOU POST? According to you, apparently not. How long would you like us to wait before we read your posts and reply to them?

For being an engineer (I read that in another post of yours) you sure talk funny. Did you ever hear the saying that data should be observable, measurable, and repeatable? You call a dyno and charts "not realistic", yet your butt dyno seems to be so finely tuned that it is able to produce this type of data. Amazing. Or, it simply confirms once more that you are clueless about engine tuning. Did it ever occur to you that every dyno has an air/fuel meter that is used as a basis for any adjustments made? Maximum power doesn't just happen by coincident, it is simply a matter of physics. Saying that "14:1 felt and worked the best for economy and power" is just very narrow minded. You should be adjusting your mixture dependent on load and the other parameters I mentioned before: timing, compression, N/A or forced induction, octane etc), which in turn will give you the results you are looking for.

And while your idea of "setting up the air/fuel mixture while riding under loads and conditions that you will likely encounter during use. Not in a lab on a treadmill." is cute, it somehow makes me doubt that you ever used the G2 gauge. I specifically asked you - twice - how you measured AFR, and you said that you "read the meter while riding under actual conditions". Nowhere did you mention the word data logging. Surely you must realize that using a readout gauge - especially a digital one that will cycle between values very fast - is pretty much useless while you are riding the bike. How the hell would you completely focus on it to get any kind of useful info across the whole RPM range, while "riding under actual conditions"? For what it's worth, even on a dyno the use of a gauge is limited. While the lab conditions - you know, like, not having to look where you bike is going at increasingly fast speeds - will allow you to monitor AFR at various throttle positions at least to a certain degree, you will still miss spikes in either direction. This is why you always need data logging, and why these "not realistic" graphs are essential....
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Old 04-29-2010, 07:59 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Griz
Maybe you and Booni

I think you need to add a few more names to that list. I don't think we're the first to have that issue with you, now are we?
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Old 04-29-2010, 08:02 AM   #42
Boon Booni
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelWisman
(quoting what I said about no fuel adaption at idle)

actually what I said was much to simplified.

There are three types of adaption, "additive", "multiplicative" and "extrapolated".

This is an informative post.
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Old 04-29-2010, 08:08 AM   #43
The Griz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM
For being an engineer (I read that in another post of yours) you sure talk funny. Did you ever hear the saying that data should be observable, measurable, and repeatable? You call a dyno and charts "not realistic", yet your butt dyno seems to be so finely tuned that it is able to produce this type of data. Amazing. Or, it simply confirms once more that you are clueless about engine tuning. Did it ever occur to you that every dyno has an air/fuel meter that is used as a basis for any adjustments made? Maximum power doesn't just happen by coincident, it is simply a matter of physics. Saying that "14:1 felt and worked the best for economy and power" is just very narrow minded. You should be adjusting your mixture dependent on load and the other parameters I mentioned before: timing, compression, N/A or forced induction, octane etc), which in turn will give you the results you are looking for.

And while your idea of "setting up the air/fuel mixture while riding under loads and conditions that you will likely encounter during use. Not in a lab on a treadmill." is cute, it somehow makes me doubt that you ever used the G2 gauge. I specifically asked you - twice - how you measured AFR, and you said that you "read the meter while riding under actual conditions". Nowhere did you mention the word data logging. Surely you must realize that using a readout gauge - especially a digital one that will cycle between values very fast - is pretty much useless while you are riding the bike. How the hell would you completely focus on it to get any kind of useful info across the whole RPM range, while "riding under actual conditions"? For what it's worth, even on a dyno the use of a gauge is limited. While the lab conditions - you know, like, not having to look where you bike is going at increasingly fast speeds - will allow you to monitor AFR at various throttle positions at least to a certain degree, you will still miss spikes in either direction. This is why you always need data logging, and why these "not realistic" graphs are essential....
A lambda sensor in the exhaust hooked up to an air/fuel ratio gauge is hardly a "butt-dyno" my friend, and IMO is actually more accurate because I'm seeing the air/fuel ratio while actually riding the bike under actual loads and conditions. I don't need to "log data". Why would I need to "log data". I would simply ride the damn bike and run through the rev range under realistic conditions, then adjust pilot jet, needle jet, and needle size accordingly. It's not that complicated man.
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The Griz screwed with this post 04-29-2010 at 09:30 AM Reason: Removed most of the head explody. Kept tuning info.
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Old 04-29-2010, 08:15 AM   #44
Boon Booni
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Griz
You saw it! Good. Proving my point on how hard you're trolling.

Some of us get notification when there's a new post in a thread we're watching. Don't blame us, we're just "Using the tools provided".
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Old 04-29-2010, 08:28 AM   #45
LukasM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Griz
You saw it! Good. Proving my point on how hard you're trolling.
I am trolling because I get email notifications to a thread I am subscribed to? Are you now going to start arguing like a 5 year old?

The problem I have seen with your posts (in this and in other threads) is that you speak with absolute conviction on a lot of topics that you have only a faint idea about. And when people point out that what you are saying makes no sense whatsoever, you get all butthurt and try to blame it on them being trolls.

Dude, you can't be an expert at everything. None of us are. Just admit when you don't know something or have made a mistake. It's ok.

As for your knowledge about engine tuning, I think everybody reading this thread can come to their own conclusion. Keep doing your thing "Exactly!! Me? I'm looking for 14.7:1." or maybe listen to other people. You might learn a thing or two.
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