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Old 10-17-2014, 04:41 AM   #1
vtduc OP
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Hydroplaning

Just wow.

http://www.weather.com/safety/autosafety/motorcycles-wet-roads-dangerous-situation-20140907
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Old 10-17-2014, 04:59 AM   #2
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"Motorcycles are much more susceptible to hydroplaning than cars are. If you compare a motorcycle tire to a car’s tire, it has much less tread and less depth to the tread. So, as a result it has less ability to channel the water away."




Seems to me that there is less thead TO hydroplane. Cars with wider tires hydoplane more than cars with skinny tires, its a known fact.
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Old 10-17-2014, 05:02 AM   #3
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And if the motorcycle hydroplanes easier, its because of weight, not the width of tire.

Maybe the author doesn't ride.
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Old 10-17-2014, 05:59 AM   #4
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Then there are motorcycles with car tires, ie Dragon Fail foto fest thread.

If a moto has a tread pattern with side siping of sufficient depth, it should be less likely to hydroplane than almost any car.

Road surface is a greater factor, though, tar snakes can bite ya if wet. In HouTex ongoing road projects get covered overnight with huge steel plates, 'bout like walking on ice when dry, don't go there if damp.
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Old 10-17-2014, 06:04 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HanzoSteel View Post
Maybe the author doesn't ride.
I've been told that motorcycles just fall over in the rain.
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Old 10-17-2014, 07:06 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinnin
I've been told that motorcycles just fall over in the rain.
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Old 10-17-2014, 08:06 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinnin View Post
I've been told that motorcycles just fall over in the rain.
Mine usually gets wet. I hear that some of them melt when they get wet.
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Old 10-17-2014, 08:06 AM   #8
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If there's rain in the forecast I just lay 'er down, that way I avoid damage from it inevitably falling over.
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Old 10-17-2014, 08:26 AM   #9
slartidbartfast
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Quote:
"Motorcycles are much more susceptible to hydroplaning than cars are. If you compare a motorcycle tire to a car’s tire, it has much less tread and less depth to the tread. So, as a result it has less ability to channel the water away."
That's a pretty matter-of-fact statement given that there is no supporting information in the article and that it goes exactly against other statements I have come across. It certainly raises the question of the science but my gut feel is that it is BS.
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Old 10-17-2014, 08:26 AM   #10
SteelJM1
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And he also apparenty forgot that MC tires are not flat... so they cut though the water more better.

Ah, nothing like idiots spouting off about stuff they know nothing aobut. He should be a politician.

He knows just enough to be dangerous
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Old 10-17-2014, 06:59 PM   #11
falcofred
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelJM1 View Post
And he also apparenty forgot that MC tires are not flat... so they cut though the water more better.

Ah, nothing like idiots spouting off about stuff they know nothing aobut. He should be a politician.

He knows just enough to be dangerous

"more better"?
You calling someone else an idiot using a term like "more better", misspelling apparently and about?
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Old 10-17-2014, 07:33 PM   #12
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Somebody has no freaking idea what they're talking about. My moto tires have deeper tread and more channeling than any car tire I've ever seen...knobbies and semi-knobs tend to be that way. Truck/SUV tires are a different story though. Neither knobs nor truck/SUV tires are necessarily the best in the rain though. The best rain tires typically are narrow, made of sticky rubber, and have a lot of channeliing and siping with many smaller blocks of tread.

Motos don't typically have issues with hydroplaning as easy as cars or trucks/SUVs. The issues that motos have with wet roads are generally traction...and the fact that only one tire in front and one tire in rear are holding those ends stable. There isn't as much margin for error if/when a moto loses traction. A car can often slide and recover. A moto that starts sliding can easily lose control in an instant, beyond possible recovery, even with good tires. There just isn't as much margin for error on a moto.
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Old 10-17-2014, 08:40 PM   #13
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A rough rule of thumb that will get you close is 8.52 x sq root of the tire pressure. That'll give an approximate hydroplane speed (in knots). Tire design/condition can change the multiplier from a little over 7-9. Bald, wide radials will be at the 7 mark and skinny, fresh, bias-plies will approach the 9. Translated the 38psi front tire on my GSW will hydroplane at approximately 60mph when plowing through up to .25" of water. My good condition Tourance rear tire at 42psi should do better PLUS it's running in the cleared track of the front tire when going straight or near straight... (That assumes my fairly fresh Ankee3 is worthy of the 8.52 multiplier.)

Before the haters hate try it. The formula gets you amazingly close and tire design/condition is less significant for this one thing than conventional logic might dictate... I have done much experimentation on my '07 4Runner with different tires, pressures and sizes over more than 185k miles. I have landed many small planes (1500lbs through 23.35k lbs landing weight) with tires in a wide variety of conditions. More than any other factor tire pressure has the greatest effect. Don't confuse greasy, heat cycled (too many times) worn tires being hard and slick with hydroplaning. ...very different issues.
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PS- Kommando, as a person with immense respect/appreciation for those who have served and as a lover of my dogs your sig just about brought me to tears. First time I noticed it. Thank you for your service.
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Old 10-18-2014, 12:08 AM   #14
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I would imagine the V-shaped motorcycle tire is much more likely to knife through water than a flat car tire, sort of like an ice skate vs a snowshoe.
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Old 10-18-2014, 04:05 AM   #15
C/1/509
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelJM1 View Post
And he also apparenty forgot that MC tires are not flat... so they cut though the water more better.

Ah, nothing like idiots spouting off about stuff they know nothing aobut. He should be a politician.

He knows just enough to be dangerous
Versus people that post on internet forums
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