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Old 01-12-2010, 04:06 PM   #91
Oh2RideMore
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great site propforward

What sites do you trust for beer kits and supplies? Midwest looks decent.
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Old 01-12-2010, 04:43 PM   #92
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Midwest is good, and www.northernbrewer.com is fabulous. Shop there with confidence.
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:20 PM   #93
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And Daggy has a place a mear block from his house. Effer.
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Old 01-12-2010, 11:01 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oh2RideMore
What sites do you trust for beer kits and supplies? Midwest looks decent.
For around ten years I've been buying stuff from MoreBeer.

http://morebeer.com/

I like their prices, (sales tax free) and service. Since I always ordered enough stuff, I would get free shipping too. Better beer is made with better ingredients. I avoid anything from a can. MoreBeer sells a lot of extract and while now a days I only use extract for starters, (or to boost the OG of a barleywine) I have always found their malt fresh.

Ron
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Old 01-13-2010, 09:10 AM   #95
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Has anyone had a go at making their own wine? My boss gave me a bottle of his own home made Merlot that was pretty excellent - just knocked up from a wine kit. I thought I might have a try at that. It would have to be Cab though.
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Old 01-13-2010, 12:22 PM   #96
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Been looking at wine.......

Looks pretty simple. Easier than beer in many ways.

I think I'll give it a go, there's not all that much gear I need to add being as I have plenty o' beer stuff.

30 bottles of cab or syrah, that would be alright.

As long as it doesn't end up tasting like battery electrolyte or summat.
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Old 01-13-2010, 09:45 PM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by propforward
Has anyone had a go at making their own wine?
I've made a pinot grigio pyment. Does that count?

I've judged in some local area homemade wine competitions. Most of the stuff I sampled wasn't all that good. If you are expecting some good cab out of one of those wine boxed kits, you may be in for some disappointment.

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Old 01-14-2010, 08:33 AM   #98
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point brew supply is a good one

http://www.pointbrewsupply.com/

I remember when their operation was a closet in a basement. I think wine is much easier, than even kit brewing. The wine side is also what keeps most homebrew stores in business.
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:54 AM   #99
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Originally Posted by Hodag
point brew supply is a good one

http://www.pointbrewsupply.com/
Road trip.

This (and O'so Brewing) your brother's place?
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Old 01-14-2010, 10:32 AM   #100
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Road trip.

This (and O'so Brewing) your brother's place?
kinda
not his place but their 1st employee
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Old 01-15-2010, 05:11 PM   #101
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Okay, so I saw the post about starting with extracts and only attempting all-grain after you have some extensive experience, buuuuuut...

How huge of an idiot would I be if I jumped right into all-grain? I can't put my finger on why, but the idea really appeals to me. Asking for humiliating failure?
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Old 01-15-2010, 05:19 PM   #102
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If the idea grabs you - go for it. Why not?

However, do some reading first, to let yourself know what you are in for.

If you were to do extract brewing first, your equipment will not be wasted, you still need it all for all grain, so there is really no downside to trying extract first. If you really dig it, then add the necessary extra equipment.

But that said, there is no reason why you can't go straight to grain brewing - just be aware that it takes more time, and there is no corner cutting if you want the beer to taste good.
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Old 01-15-2010, 05:28 PM   #103
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First batch about done primary fermentation

Bubbling has slowed, and thinking of doing the extra 2 weeks of settling in a carboy before adding priming sugar and bottling. Does the extra time really make that big of a difference in the taste/smoothness of a pale ale? On the grain kit deal, I have seen the failure, and after wasting all that time, you will pissed. Extract kits are a whole lot easier, similar to making wine from the juice extract kits....
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Old 01-15-2010, 07:44 PM   #104
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Brewing a belgian tomorrow with some of the leftovers I have from the season. Has anyone here used the Safale T-58 dry yeast? I've seen it described a spicy and peppery, which I think will go well in a strong belgian style ale. I've had really good luck with their US-05 and even their dry hefe yeast.
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Old 01-16-2010, 01:49 PM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yeroc40
Has anyone here used the Safale T-58 dry yeast? I've seen it described a spicy and peppery, which I think will go well in a strong belgian style ale.
While I don't enter many competitions, (too cheap to pay shipping charges ) I used White Labs Trappist (WLP 500) to win the 2005 AHA Nationals, Strong Bel. cat. 18. I haven't used T-58, but I've "heard" that T-58 is the closest dry yeast substitute for WLP 500... so I say go for it!

T-58 Does have a relatively low 65% attenuation, so your finished ale might be a bit on the sweet side.

Too high (or low) fermentation temperatures can have have a negative impact on your Strong Bel. brew. I suggest pitching your yeast around 70-72 degrees and once you get a vigorous fermentation going, drop it to around 62-65. While this colder fermentation temperature will retard the formation of the spicy notes and Bel. yeast character, it will also prevent the formation of unwanted higher alcohols. Once the fermentation is around 2/3 done, slowly increase the temperature to around 74-78 degrees. (The higher end of the range as the fermentation progresses) This will achieve the wanted Bel. yeast characteristics and provide conditions for maximum attenuation for your now tired yeast. Heck, near the end, you might even want to crank it up to 80-82.

Just my 2 cents,

Ron
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