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Old 03-03-2010, 02:12 PM   #46
Beater
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Location: Atlanta, GA, USA
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This just might be my neurosis ... but you need to take it real easy on that engine while your new rigns are cutting in ... Like the first 100 miles nothin above 2500rpm ... and the next 400 nothin above 3500 ...

There are all kinds of theories about cutting in rings ... and I am no expert ... but rings that don't seat correctly can really screw up the inside of your cylinders.

Just take it easy for 500 miles and you should be fine ...

PS - The bike looks GREAT
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Old 03-03-2010, 03:32 PM   #47
Yarddog
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So...how IS that Costco beer, anyway?
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Old 03-03-2010, 03:53 PM   #48
SUVslayer OP
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I'm definitely taking it very easy on the bike, but alas, it's hard to stay under 2500 rpm on the thing. But after riding it a little, I need to go back in and adjust valves, etc.

Costco (kirkland) beer's not bad! I'm sure there are those who'd poopoo it, but for garage detail it's just fine.
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Old 03-04-2010, 04:39 AM   #49
Frank06
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You don't want to baby things too much... did you hone the cylinders at all or scuff them up somehow? Generally you need to load rings a bit to get them to seat, half-throttle kind of stuff.
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Old 03-04-2010, 02:26 PM   #50
Droptarotter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank06
You don't want to baby things too much... did you hone the cylinders at all or scuff them up somehow? Generally you need to load rings a bit to get them to seat, half-throttle kind of stuff.

That's correct.......keep a load on the bike.....but do not lug it.
It's not easy to get rings seated with the Nickasil liners if you baby it too much.

Cheers
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Old 03-04-2010, 05:22 PM   #51
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I'm keeping it mostly midrange, not giving it tons of gas but staying on it, if that's what you mean. My question is, how long until they seat and you can start running it normally?
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Old 03-04-2010, 07:18 PM   #52
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You're doing well on the learning curve, Slayer.

Snowbum (he goes to Eleven, bless him ) was right after all on the no-goop rule for airhead sump and valve cover gaskets: NONE, unless you have a confirmed warped-surface condition. It only took me nearly a decade to realize this. Sump and valve cover gaskets go on dry, and the torque is very light. It's over-torquing these (esp the sump gasket) that starts leaks. Lots of goop is a very bad idea, and you can count on seeing orange permatex in the pump pickup

Exhaust nuts: i'm surprised nobody suggested slightly tightening them first, while warm. Often breaks the thread corrosion before you start removing threads on the dry removal cycle.

I use the engine's recently-run heat to start a soak-in cycle of PB, Kroil, Liq Wrench etc. Let it cool, more penetrant. Use the expansion/contraction cooldown cycles to get the penetrator in the threads. Slight tighten to break the corrosion, then more penetrant, then try removal. No go? Propane and more chem applications. Never stuck an exhaust nut yet. This is also the drill for pulling stuck muffler components apart

High-temp copper antiseize is the tits. I have a big tub of spendy Wurth stuff that's rated to 1000F or some such. It goes on liberally to any exhaust item i touch. Even standard parts-store antiseize will be a blessing next time you hafta take stuff apart
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