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Old 01-14-2010, 10:00 AM   #16
timdog
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Just one more opinion from somebody who has been watching prices:

$5000 is too much. $2500 to $3000 is the current going rate.
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Old 01-14-2010, 10:15 AM   #17
CurlyMike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caponerd
What they all said.

I bought my 1982 RT (rough, but presentable @60,000 miles) back in 2000 for $3000. It needed a new battery before I could ride it, then the diode board failed the day after I bought it.
Later, I took it to a very competent and thorough airhead wrench with instructions to check it out and take care of anything it needed.
My $3000 was nickel-and-dimed up to $5200, for which, I could have gotten an immaculate example, with either very low miles or completely restored.

Even if presented with a service history (as I was, and should have read more carefully to spot the sudden drop-off in records during the PO's stewardship!) any bike bought from an individual seller is an unknown that will probably require work before it's ready for daily service.
add to that they are OLD. Old parts fail, new parts fail. Like I tell everyone that buys one of my old bikes. A tranny that is 30-40 years old and running great one moment and fails the next isnt always a result of bad maintenance, neglect or deception. As vintage bike owners we are obligating ourselves to help stimulate the economy.
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Old 01-14-2010, 10:34 AM   #18
heffy OP
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Yeah, I've been looking at vintage motorcycles for quite some time now. I knew $5k was too much for this bike, but I wanted to see if I'd regret not buying it now.

A few days ago, I saw a leather briefcase on eBay that was exactly what I wanted, and about $100 less than what I thought I'd pay. I sat on it for a day, and when I went to go buy it, it had already been sold. I just don't want to "snooze and lose" again. Thanks guys! I'll keep my eyes open for another vintage bike.

I used to ride an old Honda Hawk NT650 back in college. Awesome bike, but it only had enough gas for like 100 miles. I'm itching to get back on a bike as soon as possible

edit: I'm in the Bay Area as well
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Old 01-14-2010, 11:48 AM   #19
BrianK
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It doesn't have to be a binary decision - pay $5K or pass. Why not counteroffer? Guy may just be hoping someone price insensitive comes along, but open to a more realistic figure - particularly if it's been out there for a while.

Good luck. Does sound like a nice bike. But no, not a $5K one, not in this market.
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Old 01-14-2010, 11:56 AM   #20
heffy OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianK
It doesn't have to be a binary decision - pay $5K or pass. Why not counteroffer? Guy may just be hoping someone price insensitive comes along, but open to a more realistic figure - particularly if it's been out there for a while.

Good luck. Does sound like a nice bike. But no, not a $5K one, not in this market.
I've had my fair share of people expecting unrealistic prices to know that if he's asking $5k, he'll probably accept nothing less than $4.5k. I once met a guy trying to sell a 2003 Maxima with a sizable dent for $1000 over blue book, and wouldn't accept anything less. I've never met someone who was willing to negotiate much on a price, especially on Craigslist
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Old 01-14-2010, 11:56 AM   #21
jtwind
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Ok, I don't agree with the masses. /5's and especially toasters have picked up in price and desireablity the last year or two. If it's truely the mileage listed and it is a gem that's about what you can expect to pay. I sold one with 33,000 in May for $5250 less than 24 hours after posting in on ADVrider. A buddy sold his r60/5 low mileage very nice toaster at the same time for $4500.00. I'm not saying I wouldn't offer the guy $4250 or something to start but it's not out of line with what I've experienced and seen lately.

Some airheads have suffered more than others in value the last couple years, the r100gs's for one and lots of your "normal" /6-/7 etc airheads, but r90s's, slash 5's and r80g/s haven't nearly as badly
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Old 01-15-2010, 12:16 AM   #22
Yarddog
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I'll share something that works well for me...if it's something that you just don't HAVE to have right now, like that briefcase probably was, I'd wait to make first contact...wait two, three weeks...even if the ad gets pulled, I'd wait...after that time, either it's been sold, OR...the guy's figured out that he's asked too much, OR...nobody's responded because his asking price is way too high...thataway, you're gonna meet with a softened seller...he just ain't gonna be as frisky as he once was...

Take only enough cash with you to meet the highest amount you'd be willing to pay before you walk away...not ten bucks more...Look at the bike, ride it, if there are owies or blemishes, say nothing, but simply rub your hand over them, or eyeball them very closely. Don't believe the seller when he says he's entertaining other offers...if he was, he'd of sold it by then. Don't believe him when he says he has others coming to look at it...by that time, nobody cares any more. When you're done lookin' and jawin', whip out your roll and offer cash...for whatever amount you figure is fair... negotiate up to the amount of cash you've got...if you don't close the deal, walk away. Don't make a standing offer. Just walk away. Tell the seller you're gonna look at a couple more that afternoon. Lie. It's ok.

Follow up a week or two later. Same offer...maybe even less. Do this until you figure it ain't ever gonna work.

You'd be surprised just how well this technique works. It requires discipline and patience.
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Old 01-15-2010, 12:31 AM   #23
heffy OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yarddog
I'll share something that works well for me...if it's something that you just don't HAVE to have right now, like that briefcase probably was, I'd wait to make first contact...wait two, three weeks...even if the ad gets pulled, I'd wait...after that time, either it's been sold, OR...the guy's figured out that he's asked too much, OR...nobody's responded because his asking price is way too high...thataway, you're gonna meet with a softened seller...he just ain't gonna be as frisky as he once was...

Take only enough cash with you to meet the highest amount you'd be willing to pay before you walk away...not ten bucks more...Look at the bike, ride it, if there are owies or blemishes, say nothing, but simply rub your hand over them, or eyeball them very closely. Don't believe the seller when he says he's entertaining other offers...if he was, he'd of sold it by then. Don't believe him when he says he has others coming to look at it...by that time, nobody cares any more. When you're done lookin' and jawin', whip out your roll and offer cash...for whatever amount you figure is fair... negotiate up to the amount of cash you've got...if you don't close the deal, walk away. Don't make a standing offer. Just walk away. Tell the seller you're gonna look at a couple more that afternoon. Lie. It's ok.

Follow up a week or two later. Same offer...maybe even less. Do this until you figure it ain't ever gonna work.

You'd be surprised just how well this technique works. It requires discipline and patience.
nice post man. Thanks a bunch.

But I needed that exact briefcase :( haha

I e-mailed the seller... he said he's asking that much because he put a lot of money to make it run. He's negotiable, but he said I'm not going to get a bargain either.
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Old 01-15-2010, 12:44 AM   #24
Yarddog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heffy
nice post man. Thanks a bunch.

But I needed that exact briefcase :( haha

I e-mailed the seller... he said he's asking that much because he put a lot of money to make it run. He's negotiable, but he said I'm not going to get a bargain either.
As a rabid buyer, your point of view is that the bike is worth only so much, REGARDLESS of how much HE put into it...there is a point with any project or vehicle where one has to ask oneself this question...If I put one more dime into this machine, will I ever get one more dime out of it? If the answer is NO, then ya sell the thing unless you're willing to take a loss. These days, more and more, sellers are willing to take a loss...

Here's my example...I bought a Harley about 5 years ago that a buddy and I had built from the ground up about 12 years prior...the only used parts on the thing were the engine cases, because they had numbers, otherwise, everything else was brand new...it cost my pal over $32,000 to build it. I bought it for $7,000, which was a phenomenal deal at the time...You couldn't touch a Big Twin of any sort at the time for under ten grand. I put another $7000-8000 into it since then.

Two years ago, I wanted to sell it to buy that same buddy's Ultra...this was at the beginning of the current depression...I advertised it initially for $13,500, went down eventually to $12,000, ran the ad for TWO MONTHS before I pulled it...wasn't gonna sell it for under that amount...today, I doubt that I could get my original $7000 out of it, because newer and better stuff is goin' for less than that...

The point is this: Today's rules pre-empt yesterday's rules...You, the buyer, are in the driver's seat. NOT the seller. No more emails or telephone commos except to make an appointment. All further jawing or negotiation takes place in person, otherwise, the guy won't take you seriously...and take your time about making the appointment. Time is on your side. If there are guys on this forum telling you what they've told you, which is what I'm telling you, then there are guys in your region who might be interested in this bike who know exactly the same thing. Take your time. This doesn't appear to be the only 1972 BMW around, and you don't need to spend a dime more than necessary...you're gonna spend puhlenty of that making this bike your very own, no matter how good a shape it's in!!!

Just my opinion, I hope you don't think I'm gettin' preachy, but this kinda deals works real well for me!!! Best of luck to ya, my friend...and don't forget to follow up and let us know what happens!
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Old 01-15-2010, 01:04 AM   #25
heffy OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yarddog
As a rabid buyer, your point of view is that the bike is worth only so much, REGARDLESS of how much HE put into it...there is a point with any project or vehicle where one has to ask oneself this question...If I put one more dime into this machine, will I ever get one more dime out of it? If the answer is NO, then ya sell the thing unless you're willing to take a loss. These days, more and more, sellers are willing to take a loss...

Here's my example...I bought a Harley about 5 years ago that a buddy and I had built from the ground up about 12 years prior...the only used parts on the thing were the engine cases, because they had numbers, otherwise, everything else was brand new...it cost my pal over $32,000 to build it. I bought it for $7,000, which was a phenomenal deal at the time...You couldn't touch a Big Twin of any sort at the time for under ten grand. I put another $7000-8000 into it since then.

Two years ago, I wanted to sell it to buy that same buddy's Ultra...this was at the beginning of the current depression...I advertised it initially for $13,500, went down eventually to $12,000, ran the ad for TWO MONTHS before I pulled it...wasn't gonna sell it for under that amount...today, I doubt that I could get my original $7000 out of it, because newer and better stuff is goin' for less than that...

The point is this: Today's rules pre-empt yesterday's rules...You, the buyer, are in the driver's seat. NOT the seller. No more emails or telephone commos except to make an appointment. All further jawing or negotiation takes place in person, otherwise, the guy won't take you seriously...and take your time about making the appointment. Time is on your side. If there are guys on this forum telling you what they've told you, which is what I'm telling you, then there are guys in your region who might be interested in this bike who know exactly the same thing. Take your time. This doesn't appear to be the only 1972 BMW around, and you don't need to spend a dime more than necessary...you're gonna spend puhlenty of that making this bike your very own, no matter how good a shape it's in!!!

Just my opinion, I hope you don't think I'm gettin' preachy, but this kinda deals works real well for me!!! Best of luck to ya, my friend...and don't forget to follow up and let us know what happens!
Not preachy at all! I appreciate the long posts. Thanks for typing that all out

I'll be sure to let you guys know how it goes.
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Old 01-15-2010, 01:07 AM   #26
Yarddog
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I shouldn't be giving away my secrets, at least for free, but, hey, I doubt that I'm gonna be negotiating with anyone that frequents this forum anyway...the fly in the ointment is the guy that has more money than sense that comes along and is willing to pay that five grand, no matter what, but just don't YOU be that fool!!!
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Old 01-16-2010, 07:12 AM   #27
Country Doc
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The value of a /5 really depends on the condition and any recent work/upgrades.

A very clean-looking but untouched /5 will require several thousand dollars of work, if not right away, then very shortly.

I would look for one that has been throughly mechanically updated, by someone that knows what they are doing. In that sense I don't think $4500-$5k is out of line. However I wouldn't pay much more than $2500-$3k for a project bike, as they get pricey really quickly.

A tip to tail rejuvenation on my 1971 /5 cost thousands of dollars in PARTS ALONE, not to mention labour and time.

dc
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Old 01-16-2010, 08:27 AM   #28
bmwloco
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Boy, things change.

Toaster Tank models were ignored, sold cheap, and generally unloved by the BMW faithful when they came out. The lollipop colors just didn't cotton to the "all BMWs are black" crowd. A lot of them had the tanks tossed, the side covers too, and converted to "Black Beauties".

Back in the early 80's you could buy Toaster Tank models all day for $1000. I did, 4 times. When I made $500 on them when I sold them, I was happy as a pig in poop.
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Old 01-16-2010, 08:48 AM   #29
Country Doc
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Yes, an old friend of mine was telling me the same thing. The toasters were not at all popular until much later. I still prefer the standard black large-tank bikes, but that's just a personal thing.

Pricing just seems to keep going up and up. Tried to price out a decent slash-2 lately??

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Old 01-16-2010, 09:11 AM   #30
Uncle Ernie
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How things USEd to be is pretty irrelevant. I used to buy R60's and R69's for 5 or 6 hundred- and they were good running bikes. So what?

It's worth whatever you're willing to pay.
I sold a super low-miles GB500 with some goodies like a Pit Bull, new tires, manual, etc. for $5K. He gets home and says "his friend" told him he paid too much.
Bottom line- you're looking at an older bike. What's it worth to YOU and are you willing to take a chance on something cheaper coming along later? If you're likely to have buyers remorse, watch prices more, make a decision, and don't listen to anyone later. Don't even tell anyone what you paid.
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