ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Ride reports
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-02-2014, 07:40 PM   #1
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Los Angeles to Prudhoe Bay

Fellow Inmates,

Hello! My name is Abhi, and while I'm no expert in long distance touring, I'm lucky enough to have had a few trips under my belt, personal favorites of which include a 2-up ride down from Los Angeles to La Paz, Baja and back on a R1100S, a week or so in Southern Utah:

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=875034

as well as a Iron Butt Association B2B ride from Canada to Mexico in less than 24 hours on a BMW K75 that was 25 years old at the time:

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=639211

For a few years, I've been dreaming of riding up to to the top of Alaska, but I never imagined I'd have the funds and the time to do so until a long time in the future. Last summer I decided I would find a way to make it work, but I wasn't sure I was ready to go it alone. My girlfriend's uncle bought a new R12GS after a long hiatus from motorcycles, and he had mentioned that he was interested in a similar trip. Once my girlfriend let me know about it, I figured I actually had to make it work. Thanks to a lot of research on this site, plenty of ride reports and advice from other inmates, it finally happened.

First confession - I started drafting this post before we left, and it was my intent to write the ride report on the road. I figured I'd give myself a couple of days on the road to see how feasible it would be before I committed to writing - and I'm glad I waited. I don't know how you guys and gals keep these things updated as you go.

So, as you've guessed, I'm back home, safe and sound. But I'd be honored if you join me as I recount the trip! Hope I can entertain you a little bit as I left the real world behind and put some more miles on my trusty GS. It's no "I traveled the country on a painful, sexy Italian supersport", but it's the best I can offer you at the moment.

So with that out of the way, I look forward to meeting you all, and I hope you enjoy what I have to share!

abhicles screwed with this post 07-04-2014 at 08:53 AM
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2014, 08:01 PM   #2
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Day 1 (6/4) - Los Angeles to Fremont, plus a little background.

You're going to meet 3 people (and our weird mascot) on this report.

Apparently, this is the only photo of all 3 of us together on the trip - with Mendenhall Glacier in the background.
Bike-urious Alaska

Individually, we’ve got my buddy Bui, who's a long time lurker and the owner of a beautiful R12GS in that fantastic white on red livery. I'm wondering if this thread is going to be enough motivation for him to create an account and comment...
Bike-urious Alaska

My girlfriend, VyVy, who is an absolute trooper for putting up with me on this trip. While she normally rides this Honda S90, she could only join us for a week of the trip, so she flew in and went 2-up with me.
Bike-urious Alaska

Myself. I'm originally from a suburb of Boston, but I now spend all of my time in sunny Los Angeles. I'm involved with a medical software startup but I just work to fund my motorcycle travel addiction.
Bike-urious Alaska

Last but not least, my riding buddy, Baby Jack. I guess you can see him on my 1150 above, but let's give him his own show. A miniature Jack Skellington from the Nightmare Before Christmas, this guy travels pretty much everywhere with me. I used to have a weird stuffed animal on the back of my bike as a joke passenger, but VyVy thought it was ugly. One day she spotted this little thing in Downtown Disney, and Baby Jack has been on the back of one of my bikes ever since. Some Baby Jack dolls have moved on to other callings (one flew off my bike on the way back home from the Grand Canyon, and the other was stolen at an In-N-Out parking lot), so "Baby Jack" has evolved into a legend rather than a specific stuffed figure. We're on Baby Jack the 3rd, and I believe he's covered about 60,000 miles in his tenure so far.
Bike-urious Alaska

Day 1 is easy to recap. I had a final for grad school that wasn't scheduled to end until 7pm. Thankfully, my professors were kind enough to let me present first so I could head out early. Packed with the most luggage I've ever put on a bike, I took off from LA and just slabbed it up to Fremont to meet Bui and get ready for our real departure early the next morning.
Bike-urious Alaska

I usually take a photo of my starting mileage right as I leave, but I was in such a rush that I forgot this time. I remembered during my first fill-up, so let's just assume that I'm about 150 miles in to the trip at this point:
Bike-urious Alaska

I got into Fremont around 2am, tried to burn off some of that nervous energy you get before a trip like this by chatting with Bui for a little bit, then went to bed.
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2014, 05:35 PM   #3
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Day 2 (6/5) - Fremont, CA to Fort Bragg, CA, ~215 miles

Did I say we planned on an early morning departure? Well, by the time we had finished uploading GPS tracks and taking care of some other administrative necessities, we were finally on our way at the crack of...early afternoon.

I had assumed that by the time we got on the road, most of the fog would have been burnt off. I was wrong.
Bike-urious Alaska

In Golden Gate Park, we were delighted to see a 50s Ford Fairlane Convertible with 4 giant teddy bears in it. Each one was wearing the jersey of a local sports team (Giants, Warriors, etc.)
Bike-urious Alaska

We spent some time playing around in the redwoods - after this photo I made Bui turn off his Clearwater Erica's any time I was taking a photo of him. They're pricey, but after seeing them work at night (or even in the day), I'm now a believer.
Bike-urious Alaska

Felt like we had to stop at the Drive-Thru Tree in Chandelier. $3 for a motorcycle - hope the photo was worth it.
Bike-urious Alaska

More of Highway 1. And less of Bui's blinding lights.
Bike-urious Alaska

Couple of tourists pose alongside a fallen redwood.
Bike-urious Alaska

When we stopped to take the last photo, Bui noticed that we were right at a turnaround line for a 10K run. Turns out that the Avenue of the Giants Run had happened a few weeks prior. Frankly, I detest running, but this would be a great place to suffer through it.
Bike-urious Alaska

I thought the R12GS looked great flanked by redwoods.
Bike-urious Alaska

Because of our late start, we only made it to Fort Bragg before we decided to call it a night. Thankfully, Fort Bragg is the home of North Coast Brewing, so I knew where I wanted to eat. In addition to two of my favorite beers (Brother Thelonious and Old Rasputin), I made sure to get a sampler to see what else was worth trying again in the future:
Bike-urious Alaska
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2014, 10:30 PM   #4
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Day 3 (6/6) – Fort Bragg, CA to Portland, OR, ~550 miles

End of the 1.
Bike-urious Alaska

This photo makes me laugh, as Bui looks like he's been sponsored by Chevron. I was surprised to see a gas station that had a separate pump for each grade. I know in Oregon, you expect to see service attendants everywhere, but even here in Northern California the way to pay was to pump (and watch the lovely analog gauges flick along), then wait for an attendant to come out to you, note the charge, go back inside, charge your card, and come back outside with your receipt to sign. Slightly bizarre - or maybe I just don't get out of big cities enough.
Bike-urious Alaska

Baby Jack says hi to Oregon. At this point we started to head inland, which would sadly cause us to miss Rogue Brewing, possibly my favorite brewery out there. Still, we had to be in Vancouver the next evening to pick up Vy from the airport, so cutting inland was our penalty for getting such a late start yesterday.
Bike-urious Alaska

I was amused to learn that Oregon's EBT card is called the Oregon Trail card. Though for reasons I didn't understand, if you used your Oregon Trail card to buy food at the gas station we stopped at, you weren't allowed to eat it on-site.
Bike-urious Alaska

Normally when I take long trips, I go solo and make it a point to visit breweries. Bui was very gracious in humoring my beer obsession and joining me at places like Deschutes. Day 3 wrapped up by me getting some Black Butte Porter on cask, an elk burger (because why not), and - if you can read the business card on the table - a recommendation from our KLR-riding waiter to go see Liard Hot Springs on our way back down from Alaska. Duly noted!
Bike-urious Alaska
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2014, 09:48 AM   #5
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Day 4 (6/7) – Portland, OR, to Pemberton, BC ~410 miles

The next day, our primary goal was to get to the airport in Vancouver in time to pick up Vy, who was flying in from Los Angeles. Almost immediately, we enjoyed an uneventful crossing into Washington - I thought they put a lot more effort into their sign that most other states I've seen, thanks to their recent anniversary.
Bike-urious Alaska

When it comes to lunch and dinner, I always try to get a "locals-only" kind of meal,preferably with beer hat I can't find back in Los Angeles. But my theory about breakfast is that conistency is key, and that's why I inevitably get a McMuffin, hash brown, and orange juice from McDonald's for breakfast when I'm on the road. They're everywhere, and they're consistent, and that helps with my routine when I need to cover serious miles on a long trip. (McDonald's ad over)
Bike-urious Alaska

Crossing the border into Canada. "Do you have over $10,000 in cash on you?" "I wish."
Bike-urious Alaska

You may have noticed earlier that the way my bike was loaded did not leave room for a passenger. Seeing as I was about to pick up the girlfriend, this presented a bit of a problem. We parked in the cell phone waiting lot and I shifted some luggage around. This finally yielded room on the back seat (and emptied the right pannier for my girlfriend's stuff), but now my bike looked like it was the size of a small car.
Bike-urious Alaska

The cell phone waiting lot allows for 30 minutes of free parking. We had cut it close, so once we got to the gate, I just found some empty space to split through. As a better citizen, Bui stopped at the gate, assuming that the attendant would take care of him. Instead, he got clocked at 31 minutes and was forced to pay an amount I can't remember, though I remember it being way too much. I told him I'd mock him for this, but it hasn't really happened yet.
Bike-urious Alaska

Success! It's the first time I've ever picked up someone from the airport on a motorcycle, and it was an interesting experience. Hopefully it won't be the last.
Bike-urious Alaska

Sea to Sky Highway - great winding road along beautiful scenery. If it wasn't for the occasional sand in the road and the laughably low speed limits (though I’d soon learn that the latter was a problem endemic to all of Canada). In the corer you can see a local taking full advantage of the road.
Update - apparently even British Columbia agrees, as they've recently announced that they'll be increasing speed limits on the road.
Bike-urious Alaska

Good news! I got a new phone. Bad news - because I lost my old phone to the highway gods because it flew out of my tankbag after I had connected it to the Sena headset via bluetooth. I never realized how much I needed a Sena until I borrowed Bui's for this trip.
Bike-urious Alaska

Within an hour of picking up Vy, we had spotted our first bear. I had told people that I'd be happy with the entire trip as long as I got to see one bear (relatively) up close. Took care of that goal early!
Bike-urious Alaska

Once you spend some time 2-up on a bike with luggage, it feels like a rocket when it's just you.
Bike-urious Alaska

Pemberton is apparently famous for its potatoes. In fact, there's a sign that greets you at the beginning of town saying you're basically not allowed to even plant your own without permission, though I wasn't able to get a photo of it. We found a motel run by a very pleasant Korean family, suffered through our first encounter with persistent mosquitoes, and called it a night.
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2014, 05:38 AM   #6
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Day 5 (6/8) – Pemberton, BC to Vanderhoof, BC ~435 miles

Before going to bed the previous night, we noticed another couple of bikes, presumably belonging to ADVRiders, that were also parked outside the motel. There was a BMW XChallenge and a KTM that I cannot remember.

The next morning, we woke up to find that KTM had been knocked over.
Bike-urious Alaska

The landlord asked us to help him put the bike back up on the stand, and I left a note so the owner would know what happened. When we talked to the owner about it, he said it that most likely, a bear had knocked it over. At least the bear had good taste and left the BMWs upright.
BIke-urious Alaska

Heading north, we had a great road in the morning that followed along a river.
Bike-urious Alaska


Vy takes in the scenery.
Bike-urious Alaska

After 27 years of life, I finally got to try Tim Horton's. All I wanted to know was how their Boston Creme donut compared to Dunkin's. My vote goes to Dunkin Donuts.
Bike-urious Alaska

VyVy and Baby Jack take a break from riding somewhere in southern British Columbia.
Bike-urious Alaska

Bui tries his best eagle impression.
Bike-urious Alaska

Randomly noticed that a bee had somehow died and then fallen right into a hole created by the buckles of my Wolfman tank panniers. I was quite happy with these bags, but I'll get more into that later. I left the bee there to see how long it would stay on the bike. I figured it'd be gone within the hour, but it actually stayed for at least 600 miles before it eventually fell out.
Bike-urious Alaska

Stopped to get a break from the rain in Smithers, BC. Surprisingly, we found a Ukrainian place called Louise's Kitchen, so we decided to give it a shot. Ordered borscht and perogies because that's what you have to do, and it was absolutely fantastic - the perfect warm food for a cold, wet day. Highly recommend Louise's!
Bike-urious Alaska

When it rains, I take way less photos. The miles ticked away until we got to Vanderhoof, and we decided to stay at the North Country Inn. Excellent place to stay, all though there's really nothing to do in town.
Bike-urious Alaska

Because there's nothing to do in town, we ate at the restaurant that's part of North Country, where I found this amusing sign.
Bike-urious Alaska
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2014, 03:31 AM   #7
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Day 6 (6/9) – Vanderhoof, BC to Prince Rupert, BC ~385 miles

June 9, 2014 – Vanderhoof, BC to Prince Rupert, BC ~385 miles

Got an early start the next day because we had to catch the ferry that night, and the ferry system says you should be there 3 hours early. Now I know that's not really true, but you always try to err on the side of caution when you're doing something for the first time. Saw a sign I haven't seen before.
Bike-urious Alaska

The 16 heading west from Vanderhoof is more fun that I would have expected - plenty of twisties and elevation changes.
Bike-urious Alaska

Well, do you?
Bike-urious Alaska

Getting ready to head into the weather.
Bike-urious Alaska

We plugged along through intermittent to heavy rains that could not damper the scenery until we eventually got into Prince Rupert and the port. I played the role of dumb tourist quite effectively, somehow managing to get lost in the terminal for a few minutes before finding the ticket office.
Bike-urious Alaska

Eventually we were squared away, so we went back in town to get dinner. By the time we got back to staging, I was pleasantly surprised by the number of bikes and riders that would be sharing the journey with us.
Bike-urious Alaska

Our home for the next 30+ hours - the MV Matanuska.
Bike-urious Alaska

We walked around and met a bunch of great motorcycle travelers. A couple of my favorites were Clay (not pictured) and his wife, who had taken this Harley and custom trailer setup all the way from Key West.
Bike-urious Alaska

There were also Mike and Jana, who were in the middle of a 48 state tour that hey had commenced in Virginia.
Bike-urious Alaska

After another 30 minute wait, it was time to get on the ferry.
Bike-urious Alaska

Securing the bikes - next stop, Juneau, as shown on the pieces of paper taped to our windshields. They load cars in based on your port of exit, but typically motorcyclists go first. That worked out well, because Bui was planning on camping on the ferry deck. Even though we took a while to secure and get our luggage, he still pretty much had his pick of real estate up top. Bike-urious Alaska

Our trusty vessel.
Bike-urious Alaska

Went to check in with Bui, got one last look at the moon out at sea, and then retired to my cabin for the night.
Bike-urious Alaska
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2014, 12:19 PM   #8
ubermick
the n00biest
 
ubermick's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2014
Location: SF Bay Area
Oddometer: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by abhicles View Post
I was amused to learn that Oregon's EBT card is called the Oregon Trail card. Though for reasons I didn't understand, if you used your Oregon Trail card to buy food at the gas station we stopped at, you weren't allowed to eat it on-site.
Bike-urious Alaska
Hah! I wonder if you break the rules and ate it on-site anyways, would you die of dysentery?

Great RR - looking forward to the rest!
ubermick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2014, 12:39 PM   #9
Hoop71
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Hoop71's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2012
Location: Vancouver
Oddometer: 118
Within an hour of picking up Vy, we had spotted our first bear. I had told people that I'd be happy with the entire trip as long as I got to see one bear (relatively) up close. Took care of that goal early!
Bike-urious Alaska[/QUOTE]

Nice!! I have lived in BC for 17 years and done that road countless times and I have yet to see a bear! 17 years and counting
__________________
2014 White R1200GSAW
Hoop71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2014, 01:40 PM   #10
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ubermick View Post
Hah! I wonder if you break the rules and ate it on-site anyways, would you die of dysentery?

Great RR - looking forward to the rest!
Haha - considering the quality of the food they were serving, you might not even need to break the law to enjoy a disease!

Glad you're enjoying it - more coming soon.
__________________
Bike-urious - the best bikes for sale, every day.
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2014, 03:00 PM   #11
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoop71 View Post
Nice!! I have lived in BC for 17 years and done that road countless times and I have yet to see a bear! 17 years and counting
I'm not surprised! I was stunned to see the bear there, and just around the corner there were plenty of unaware pedestrians - so I'm guessing they haven't seen bears there, either!
__________________
Bike-urious - the best bikes for sale, every day.
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2014, 05:42 PM   #12
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Day 7 (6/10) – On The Ferry, 0 road miles

I realize that most people doing this trip don't take the ferry - it's expensive, it ain't quick, and...you 're not enjoying your bike when you're on the water! But one of the milestones we wanted to see was Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, and for that you can only get in by air or sea.

With that rationalization out of the way, here's what happened on a rare day completely off the bikes:

First, for those of you curious what the rooms are like on the ferry. They're sparse, but comfortable enough.
Bike-urious Alaska

As I mentioned before, Bui decided to tent on the top, so we set out to catch up with him the next morning. On the way to the top, we found this room where people had brought giant air mattresses. This might have made me laugh so hard I was worried I'd wake someone up.
Bike-urious Alaska

Vy sits on the helipad as she waits for Bui to get out of his fantastic 25 year old Eureka tent (the blue on the side). That guy takes incredible care of his gear, which is much more than I can say for myself.
Bike-urious Alaska

Captain Phillips does not seem like a good movie to show on a large boat full of people.
Bike-urious Alaska

As we pulled into our first port of call, some seaplanes decided to join us.
Bike-urious Alaska

We got into Ketchikan and decided to explore a bit. I swear that every dog in Alaska was just like this - totally free and without a care in the world. They never barked at you or even really looked at you.
Bike-urious Alaska

Ketchikan is best known for Shakes Island and its Totem Poles. Though the main building on the island had a beautiful front wall (with an interesting choice of location for the door), it was unfortunately closed.
Bike-urious Alaska

Still, we were able to go around to the back and see several totem poles on the ground. No idea why they weren't standing upright somewhere, but this one was one of my favorites.
Bike-urious Alaska

We did managed to see "Totem Pole Park", which apparently just has this one in it. Vy decided to add Baby Jack to the set of figures.
Bike-urious Alaska

This photo makes me laugh every time I see it. I'm convinced it's a mural of a stripper mermaid entertaining several marine animals. Look at all their creepy smiles! I don't care what you say, you won't be able to change my mind.
Bike-urious Alaska

This bar provides you with a helpful flowchart for a question where the answer is always no. Though I'm not sure "Fireball? FIREBALL!" is the way to get there.
Bike-urious Alaska

Another door at the same bar.
Bike-urious Alaska

I can't imagine she has much competition, but Jennifer would earn my business just based on the name of her shop alone.
Bike-urious Alaska

A little panorama with our last view of Ketchikan before getting back on the boat.
Bike-urious Alaska

Vy noticed that "normal operations' were a significant risk of attack. Say again? I thought this was some sort of oversight but then I saw the same sign at several other ports along the journey.
Bike-urious Alaska

Back on board, we came across a custom Econoline that had been setup by Roadview to measure things like road surface quality, deformation size, and more. Check out this site for more about their setup.
Bike-urious Alaska

So close, yet so far.
Bike-urious Alaska

Enjoying a little lean as we wait in port.
Bike-urious Alaska

Caught some marine life as we headed out.
Bike-urious Alaska

I rushed this photo because I was so embarrassed of taking it in front of a bunch of old people. Still, Baby Jack does his best Titanic impression.
Bike-urious Alaska

This is pretty much the closest to a bike picture you're going to get from today - we chat it up with Mike and Jana (the couple on the 48 state trip). He was on a R12GS that was fully loaded, and she was on a F700GS that was basically brand new. I think they had originally planned on going to Copper Center, but Bui kept trying to convince them to head even further north. It worked - they eventually made their way up to the Arctic Circle!
Bike-urious Alaska

As you know, the further you get up north, the lighter it stays at night. Took this at about 10:30pm and called it a night.
Bike-urious Alaska
__________________
Bike-urious - the best bikes for sale, every day.

abhicles screwed with this post 07-22-2014 at 04:45 PM
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 04:44 PM   #13
abhicles OP
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Oddometer: 78
Day 8 (6/11) – Juneau, AK - 0 road miles

As I said before, the primary reason for our inconvenient detour through Juneau was to see Mendenhall Glacier - today was finally the day.

I'll be the first to admit that I have a bad habit of planning for the best and then improvising when things inevitably fall apart. But I still wasn't excited to wake up the next morning to a voicemail and email from the Alaska Ferry System saying that our ferry out of Juneau the next day had been cancelled. Seeing as you can't ride out of Juneau, we'd be stuck for another day, meaning we had one less day to make it to Anchorage to get Vy back to the airport.

Though I had enough service to pick up the voicemail at night, that morning I didn't have any, so I explored the ship to see if I could use a phone. Found this cool internal one, but it wouldn't really help me with my needs.
Bike-urious Alaska


Turns out that a ferry had broken down in Bellingham, Washington and so the system was scrambling to make up for it. We didn't have any other options besides waiting a day - so why fret about it? We got housing through the University of Fairbanks - apparently there weren't many spaces left, but the guy who runs summer housing is an ex-motorcyclist who went out of his way to help us out.
Bike-urious Alaska

Time to enjoy the glacier. Seeing as I had no idea what I was doing, I hired Above & Beyond Alaska for a private guided hike for the 3 of us up to Mendenhall. Short story? I highly, highly recommend them and would be glad to answer any questions you might have about them. Here's our incredible guide, Annie. We were huge fans.
Bike-urious Alaska

I took way too many pictures of the hike, so I'll try my best to keep it short here. First you hike through forest, on well-maintained paths.
Bike-urious Alaska

Every once in a while you get something steeper, but it's pretty basic for about 90 minutes.
Bike-urious Alaska

Our first peek at the glacier.
Bike-urious Alaska

The hardest part is a little rock scramble...
Bike-urious Alaska

that gets you to some great views.
Bike-urious Alaska

Can't say I remember the exact amount of time, but I'm guessing about 2.5-3 hours in, you start getting close to the glacier. Annie said that Mendenhall's about a mile wide, which I didn't believe.
Bike-urious Alaska

But then when I zoomed in 16x, I saw a group of people. Considering how tiny they were, one mile wide didn't seem unrealistic anymore.
Bike-urious Alaska

Apparently this bird was a tasty snack for some animal.
Bike-urious Alaska

Get used to Baby Jack photos - there'll be a lot of him. Here he displays his ice climbing prowess. Once you get to the glacier, Above & Beyond provides cold weather gear, pickaxes, and crampons that strap on to your boots.
Bike-urious Alaska

Bui utilizes that gear to scale a steep hill.
Bike-urious Alaska

I get a little excited with the axe in my attempt to send some ice flying.
Bike-urious Alaska

A different perspective of the glacier.
Bike-urious Alaska

Our guide set up an ice screw so that we could lean into a large hole,
Bike-urious Alaska

which led to a view like this.
Bike-urious Alaska

Just a few moments later, we got to the good stuff: the opening of the ice cave.
Bike-urious Alaska

And we're in. Here's a few shots of the inside of the Mendehall Ice Cave.
Bike-urious Alaska

Bike-urious Alaska

The glacier was apparently about 3 times longer just 10 years ago, and some people believe that the cave will be gone in just 5-10 years. The entire glacier has been melting at an alarming rate, and from a tourism perspective, companies are hoping that the melting will at least open up another cave as the current one disappears.
Bike-urious Alaska

Obligatory Baby Jack photo.
Bike-urious Alaska

I mentioned earlier that Above & Beyond provides some gear, but they don't provide gloves. I made sure to bring along my Alpinestars Archer X-Trafits, which worked surprisingly well in the snow and ice. Here's my corny photo to prove I actually brought them into the ice cave. Eventually I'll write up a formal review on them, but in general I'm a fan.
Bike-urious Alaska

The cave opens up at the end, and Bui got this great photo of a rock eroding its way to the bottom.
Bike-urious Alaska

Making our way back - the trail is well kept and even has ropes for tiny descents like this one.
Bike-urious Alaska

Annie tells one of her trademark silly jokes. This one was along these lines:
"Two whales walk into a bar. The bartender asks them what they want.
The first whale replies: WOOOOOOWWWWWW WOOOOOOOEEEEEEEEEEE WOAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOAAAAAAAAAAAAA WOOOOO (the key is to make it as long, awkward, and semi-'whale sounding' as possible)
The second whale says: “Go home, Frank. You’re drunk”.
Bike-urious Alaska

There's some sort of wood joke here that I won't make.
Bike-urious Alaska

Bike-urious Alaska

Bullshit!
Bike-urious Alaska

After a long day of hiking, I relaxed with some salmon and beer at Twisted Fish, an excellent dining option with plenty of beer options from Alaskan Brewing Co.
Bike-urious Alaska

We got back to our dormitory, where Vy found some paintings of marine life. After having a laugh at this painting of a seal, we called it a night.
Bike-urious Alaska
__________________
Bike-urious - the best bikes for sale, every day.
abhicles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 06:47 PM   #14
OldSlowBaldGuy
Adventurer
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Oddometer: 31
Love the pictures from the cave!
OldSlowBaldGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2014, 07:33 PM   #15
SleazyRider
Desolate Loner
 
SleazyRider's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2008
Location: Long Island
Oddometer: 160
Baby Jack is filthy!
__________________
Manboy in the Promised Land
SleazyRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 08:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014