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Old 04-24-2010, 11:45 PM   #91
miguelito OP
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Location: San Miguel de Allende, GTO, Mexico
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Originally Posted by soulduck
A friend has followed Steve's books in many places and when finding the prices higher has tried saying that he plans to write Rick and get the information updated in the next edition. He says that the price often drops right down. They don't want to lose the endorsement.
I am following your trip and enjoying your great write-ups and pictures.
Hola soulduck! Yeah. I may contact Lonely Planet and provide an update for them. I usually only use the book as a starting point anyway, so I'm not terribly put out by the discrepancies. Thanks for following along amigo.
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Old 04-25-2010, 12:31 AM   #92
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Well, I kinda stalled out here in keeping this trip report up to date. I will get back to it though for those of you following along. I reached a point a couple of weeks ago, where i was feeling tooo connected via the web, and that I wasn't really feeling like I'd gotten away, (which was one of my main objectives of this trip). So if you are actually following along, bear with me. I'll update as I can, and am inclined.

Here are some pics from the Patzcuaro area in the meantime:

Tarasco ruins near Ihuatzio. This is the only site of pre-Columbian ruins in Mexico that had a wall surrounding the main plaza, presumably for defense.









Lots of beautiful rock walls of volcanic stone near Ihuatzio.


I rode a circumnavigation of the lake and stopped in many of the small towns surrounding it. The Catholic priest who worked to empower the local indios in the area steered the different villages into working in different crafts, and still today, the various villages are reknowned for basket weaving, wood carving, stone carving, pottery, weaving, furniture making, and more. It's a very art-craft oriented area, and beautiful to boot.

View from a nice little restaurant I stopped at on the West side of the lake


I think this is Ihuatzio.




This was in San Andres. If you get there, stop and buy a beer from Jaime at the cervezeria on the corner of the plaza, and say "Hi" from me.



The dogs of San Andres. I think these perros have their priorities pretty well figured out. I rode between them, and they never batted an eye.


San Andres


Can't remember this town's name, but it was pretty big, and on the west side of the lake. Many of the locals speak the indigenous language only in these villages.




Another small village I rode off the lake road about 8 km to explore.


Bull fighting is big in the area.


Some ranches have their own bull fight rings...


Back to Patzcuaro







This was my second floor terrace outside the lovely and economico Hotel de San Alejandro


And the view from it.


Unfortunately after returning from a boat trip to the main island, Janitzio, I found my memory card dislodged in my camera, so I missed out on those photos. :(
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Old 04-28-2010, 03:04 PM   #93
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Patcuaro-Uruapan-Guanajuato

It's a beautiful, and fun ride on the libre from Patzcuaro to Uruapan. I had planned on spending at least a night in Uruapan, but decided to ride on to Guanajuato in one day. Unfortunately my memory chip in my camera was dislodged for my whole trip through Guanajuato and to San Miguel de Allende, so I have no photos of the beautiful, but difficult to drive in, town of Guanajuato. Parking is almost impossible to find downtown even with a moto, so I checked into the first hotel with parking that I came to after exiting the series of tunnels under the city, (Antiguo & Vapor). It turned out to be a rather expensive place to stay. I had thought I might rent an apartment spend a longer time in Guanajuato, but something about the town didn't ring a bell with me, plus it felt a little claustrophobic, so I moved on after three nights.

The ride to Dolores Hidalgo is beautiful, has no topes to speak of, and is fun to ride on a moto. I stopped in Dolores H., but quickly left for San Miguel de Allende. I was prepared to not spend much time here, but I found the most comfortable bed I've slept in for the last three months at Hotel Casa Linda, again not cheap, but not as much as my Guanajuato hotel.

The view from the terrace outside my room at Hotel Casa Linda.


I just rented a really nice casita here for the next month, so I'm in for a long stay here.

Street scene outside my casita.


Views from the casita's rooftop terrace.














Typical street scene.


The town bull ring.


I looked at smaller places to rent, and there are plenty available, with a short walk to el centro for around $450 US/month. After looking at a few, I decided to splurge on a bigger, and much nicer casita only 2 blocks from the jardin, (el centro). If anyone wants to see what $900/month rents in San Miguel, here's a pretty lousy video, but it will give you an idea of what you can get.






and a link in case the embed doesn't work. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7cMYs7OyiQ


It's a charming little town and the restaurants are really good and a welcome change from my diet of tacos and enchiladas from the last 3+ months.

miguelito screwed with this post 05-26-2010 at 09:29 AM
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Old 05-26-2010, 08:24 AM   #94
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Miguel dumps the Versys in the dirt

Well my account of this moto ride begins with a girl, (and a beautiful one at that). I got a call from Bekka as I sat on the rooftop terrace of my rental here in the colonial town of San Miguel de Allende sipping tequila, drinking beer, and smoking cigarillos with three friends. She proceeded to inform me that she was with a couple of motorcyclist friends at a bar across town, and they were going on a moto ride tomorrow, then passed the phone off to her friend Art.

Art proceeded to invite me to join him and a couple of other riders for what he promised would be a spectacular overnight ride with a short section of dirt on “maintained dirt roads”. While I’m not a big off road rider, I’ve done some dirt, even some single track, and within a few minutes a rendezvous time and place was agreed upon for the following morning.

When I awoke, and the after-effects of the beer and tequila were making themselves felt, I considered rolling over and going back to sleep, but mustered myself and rode out to the rendezvous where I met Art, George, and Charley for the first time. We traveled a long ways on pretty boring roads albeit with beautiful views before finally busting off onto a side road with beautiful sweeping turns and speco views in all directions. A lakeside section took us through a long rock hewn tunnel where upon exiting we stopped to look at a dam built into a narrow cleft in the rock before entering another tunnel. We heard shouting, and eventually snapped to the fact that it was the marines guarding the dam telling us to make like hockey players and “get the puck out of there”.


http://i759.photobucket.com/albums/x...n/DSCN3773.jpg

Eventually we gassed up in the town of Zimapan and took off on a dirt road toward what would turn out to be a road to an area full of mines. We descended through a series of switchbacks what must have been a drop of a few thousand feet, occasionally pulling over for the oncoming ore hauling trucks.





When we reached the riverbed so far below our point of entry, the heat was incredible and my helmet and non-mesh jacket I brought with me into Mexico in January were saturated.









After crossing the river, we began the slow ascent of even tighter, less well maintained roads. The riding, was slow but not too difficult, though the price of error could have been great as the outside edge of the road was a continuous drop-off that could send one tumbling for hundreds of feet before much would stop you. We stopped a couple of times on the ascent and eventually reached a pullout where we could see a little village way below us with a bridge crossing a large river. It was here we realized that that bridge was where we wanted to be, and a decision was made which direction to go to reach it as we had just passed a fork in the road we’d been traveling.

In the upper right of this pic you can see the bridge we want to get to.















George thought we needed to continue up, and took off on his KLR, but as the rest of us surveyed the roads below us, we thought the lower fork might be the way down to the bridge. Charley took off after George, and soon returned with Jorge and we soon found the lower fork dead-ending into the open maw of a mine. A mine worker explained that for us to reach the bridge, we needed to descend all the way back the way we came to the river and ride the river bed out to the little town we’d seen from above. Did somebody say “river bed”? What happened to the “maintained roads” Art had been peddling the previous night? It began to dawn on me that these guys were doppelgangers for my friends back in the US. Not much difference whatsoever really, as they all continually sucker me into going places I would never have chosen to go left to my own devices, and therein lies the adventure in this adventure ride.



So about face we go, and descend to the dry riverbed again and turn downstream through a vertical cleft and a shallow stream that is spectacularly beautiful. We continue on with occasional stops under shade trees. I’m seriously dehydrated at this point, and am kicking myself for liking the taste of tequila so much, as well as not having the foresight to bring a bottle of water. The ride through the shallow creek goes on and on and the place is magical, although some of the magic may have been due to my growing punchiness from my dehydration. Eventually we began to see signs of human habitation, and the riverbed track turned onto an ungraded dirt road paralleling a large river. We’re almost back to civilization, and all I can think of is reaching the first tienda, and snagging a liter of cold water to quench my parched throat.






We’re almost racing now on the hardpack, and I’m probably too close to Art’s tail, but I can taste that cool water in the back of my mind and can’t seem to dial it back. As we enter a dry dusty stretch where the dust from Art’s bike obscures my view of the road, I see his rear wheel bobble a bit, but it’s too late for Miguel to adjust velocity or direction and as I hit the same point, my bike decides it’s tired, and wants to lie down for a bit. Oops!

Well, the Versys’s left quarter faring isn’t as pretty as it used to be, (busted up real good actually), and my inattention to chain maintenance is showing, as the chain is off the rear sprocket, and the wheel is spinning freely. I heard/felt something crack when I fell on my left rear shoulder, but I don’t feel too bad, so with a big assist from Charley, we get the bike back up and the chain back on, and continue the remaining ½ mile of dirt to the bridge and pavement. Ain’t that the way it always goes?

At the first tienda, we all down a liter of agua and a few of us quaff a beer as well. It’s a sign of how dehydrated I must have been that I didn’t drink a beer. That almost never happens…

Now we’re on an amazing paved road, with an excellent surface as we begin ascending thousands of feet, until eventually we’re in the trees, and the temperature is cool, especially with my jacket soaked in sweat.





After a brief tour of the mountain town of San Joaquin we settle into the first hotel we passed upon entering town, and after a cursory cleanup, begin drinking beer and tequila, (courtesy of Jorge!). As the sun sets we move across the street to another restaurant and are eventually politely asked by the staff to leave, so they can clean up and go home. Ha!

Day 2 is a gorgeous ride with nice sweeping turns punctuated by sharp twisties, out of San Joaquin and back to San Miguel on the slab. After a lunch stop with a view at a local hang gliding spot, we hit the trail and are back in SMA in time for the weekly meeting of the local motorcyclists club, Motoclassico de San Miguel de Allende and more drinking. Go figger…





In spite of my dump, it was a great trip with a great bunch of guys. Thanks to Bekka and the boys for inviting me.

miguelito screwed with this post 08-31-2010 at 01:41 PM
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Old 05-26-2010, 09:16 AM   #95
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nice,very beauterful!
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Old 05-26-2010, 09:16 AM   #96
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great photos !! hows the arm old man ? ..lol ...
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Old 05-26-2010, 09:21 AM   #97
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great photos !! hows the arm old man ? ..lol ...
Actually doing well after a painful first week following the dump. I'll see you in a month or so amigo.
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Old 06-28-2010, 09:54 PM   #98
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Miss the reports,, how is the arm?? need to keep this on the front page
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Old 08-05-2010, 09:35 AM   #99
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Gasandasphalt - Miguelito is back in NM, and just passed through Santa Fe, on a tour of the Rockies with his new girlfriend from Mexico, (cute!), . He's traveling without a computer, and says he'll update the thread when he settles down for awhile.
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Old 08-05-2010, 12:36 PM   #100
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I wondered what ever happened to him.... glad he is back and in good health.....G&A
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Old 08-25-2010, 05:02 PM   #101
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Mexico to USA and back to Mexico

Well, that was a long hiatus. I blame the girl.



I just had no time to write. Ain't love grand? During my extended stay in San Miguel de Allende, I had two girlfriends, the first of whom was kind enough to introduce me to the second, and the rest is history.


San Miguel de Allende at daybreak the day of my departure.

Dianna has a charity she runs that takes disadvantaged kids up in balloons, hoping to inspire them to dream bigger dreams, called www.theozproject.org




She took me out to a friends rancho for a Mexican rodeo, ( charriada). Chuck is an awesome guy and one of the few registered gringo Charros in the Mexican "rodeo" scene.



Alfonso is a gentleman and another team member of our home team.



Parade of the Locos in San Miguel. These guys and gals danced for hours on a hot day in costume.



I rode back to the US through Zacatecas, (one of my favorite towns in Mexico), and Hidalgo del Parral.

Then along the Rio Grande from Presidio to Alpine texas.


Where I spent the night with a friend. thanks Jesse.



I ended up returning to the US just as my visa was about to expire, and met Dianna in New Mexico for a 10 day ride through the Rocky Mountains, which then morphed into 35 days of riding 2-up on a Versys for about 5300 miles. I figure that's got to be at or near some kind of record for this bike.



We met advrider mundobravo and his lovely mujer in Santa Fe, and rode to Pagosa Springs, CO, and then on to Durango through some pretty big thunderstorms.




Mundo & Dianna`on Brazos Pass , NM


After Mundo & Gemma returned to Santa Fe, Dianna realized she had left her debit card at the C & W bar we'd been at the previous night. No problem. We called, but they had no answering machine. After riding by the bar, we saw that they don't open to 4 PM. When we returned, we saw that they are actually closed Sunday thru Wed. Sh#t! The 10 day trip was all ready being altered severely. We ended up abandoning the debit card, and striking out on our own.



We saw a balloon rally in Steamboat Springs.





Met up with another Versys rider, Hipshot, at our motel in Hot Sulphur Springs, and shared an evening drinking cerveza, swapping tales, and travel tips.




It's not easy riding two up for so long, but after a stressful moment or two, we worked out the glitches, and had a great ride. Unfortunately, I hadn't charged the camera before leaving, figuring I'd be Ok for 10 days or so. True to my estimate, the battery died after about 8 days, so no pics from the following ride that took us through Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and back thru Colorado to New Mexico.

I'm now back in Mexico with the cute girl, and settling into my other life where I write for a living. Anyone coming through San Miguel de Allende is welcome to PM me for info on the town, where to eat, stay, share a cerveza, etc. For those of you who followed along on this rambling report, thanks for hanging in there, and buen viaje. Cheers! - Miguelito

miguelito screwed with this post 10-02-2010 at 07:18 PM
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Old 10-15-2010, 11:58 AM   #102
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Querretero & ?Bernal

This report has little about the riding, (which was not all that interesting), but has more to do with the destinations. Dianna and I took an overnight trip from San Miguel De Allende to the neighboring towns of Queretero and Bernal last week. Here are some pics of the towns and areas we visited.


Queretero is a big town of about a half million people, but has a lovely old town, with lots of shops and restaurants.






Getting lost and checking the map.


We walked around quite a bit and found a shortage of hotels, (especially less expensive ones). There were several in the 1500 peso range. We finally settled on the Hotel Seraphin, a so-called "boutique hotel" located on Calle Independencia. near el centro which cost 1000 pesos for the night, (about $80US). They have a liquor cart available to the guests which we availed ourselves of, thus increasing the value of the hotel. :) I'd recommend the hotel Seraphin to anyone wanting to stay in the historic area of town. We afterwards saw a hotel on 16 de Septiembre just off the Corregedora for 720 pesos, which would have been fine, but was not nearly as nice. Most of the other hotels we checked out started at about 1400 pesos.





They had a nice sitting area outside our room. I think we might have been the only guests that night.




The room was comfortable and well kept.


They also had free parking in a lot about a block and a half away, but let me bring the bike inside their front gate for the night.


We found an open air restaurant about 2 blocks away with a four course meal, (salad/soup/spaghetti/stuffed chicken breast), for 50 pesos, (or about $4US). Deal!

The next day we rode out by the aqueduct toward Bernal, a small colonial town. We had forgotten to bring a detailed map, and we ended up stopping for directions about 9 times before arriving there by a circuitous route that probably doubled the mileage and time it should have taken us to get there.



We had a walk around, ate lunch, and returned to San Miguel by about 5PM.















They were both beautiful towns and it was a nice trip, although the riding wasn't very exciting, as it was mostly straight, flat roads. :(
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Old 09-14-2011, 08:28 PM   #103
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Trolling through the RR's,winter is a coming and I'm thinking of Mexico,when I saw yours I realised that I never did finish it.Well now I have and it was excellent,full of great info.Thanks for taking us along.

John

PS You done good with the new girl friend,in fact very good.
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Old 11-15-2011, 06:40 PM   #104
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Originally Posted by miguelito View Post
Well, that was a long hiatus. I blame the girl.



I just had no time to write. Ain't love grand? During my extended stay in San Miguel de Allende, I had two girlfriends, the first of whom was kind enough to introduce me to the second, and the rest is history.


San Miguel de Allende at daybreak the day of my departure.

Dianna has a charity she runs that takes disadvantaged kids up in balloons, hoping to inspire them to dream bigger dreams, called www.theozproject.org




She took me out to a friends rancho for a Mexican rodeo, ( charriada). Chuck is an awesome guy and one of the few registered gringo Charros in the Mexican "rodeo" scene.



Alfonso is a gentleman and another team member of our home team.



Parade of the Locos in San Miguel. These guys and gals danced for hours on a hot day in costume.



I rode back to the US through Zacatecas, (one of my favorite towns in Mexico), and Hidalgo del Parral.

Then along the Rio Grande from Presidio to Alpine texas.


Where I spent the night with a friend. thanks Jesse.



I ended up returning to the US just as my visa was about to expire, and met Dianna in New Mexico for a 10 day ride through the Rocky Mountains, which then morphed into 35 days of riding 2-up on a Versys for about 5300 miles. I figure that's got to be at or near some kind of record for this bike.



We met advrider mundobravo and his lovely mujer in Santa Fe, and rode to Pagosa Springs, CO, and then on to Durango through some pretty big thunderstorms.




Mundo & Dianna`on Brazos Pass , NM


After Mundo & Gemma returned to Santa Fe, Dianna realized she had left her debit card at the C & W bar we'd been at the previous night. No problem. We called, but they had no answering machine. After riding by the bar, we saw that they don't open to 4 PM. When we returned, we saw that they are actually closed Sunday thru Wed. Sh#t! The 10 day trip was all ready being altered severely. We ended up abandoning the debit card, and striking out on our own.



We saw a balloon rally in Steamboat Springs.





Met up with another Versys rider, Hipshot, at our motel in Hot Sulphur Springs, and shared an evening drinking cerveza, swapping tales, and travel tips.




It's not easy riding two up for so long, but after a stressful moment or two, we worked out the glitches, and had a great ride. Unfortunately, I hadn't charged the camera before leaving, figuring I'd be Ok for 10 days or so. True to my estimate, the battery died after about 8 days, so no pics from the following ride that took us through Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and back thru Colorado to New Mexico.

I'm now back in Mexico with the cute girl, and settling into my other life where I write for a living. Anyone coming through San Miguel de Allende is welcome to PM me for info on the town, where to eat, stay, share a cerveza, etc. For those of you who followed along on this rambling report, thanks for hanging in there, and buen viaje. Cheers! - Miguelito
Nice ride report. I enjoyed following you along on your journey. Interesting that you chose San Miguel after all the travelling you did. Was there any particular reason you chose this town or did it just happen that way? Having read a little bit about SMA I am interested in your perspective on the city. Great Job on the report!!
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Old 11-15-2011, 08:30 PM   #105
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It's funny to recognize an alley in such a small and remote place as Bernal. My cousin's house is a block from the top of the alley.

Better roads uphill through the mountains.
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