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Old 05-29-2013, 11:01 AM   #15781
SchizzMan
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That will forever be funny!
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Old 05-29-2013, 11:06 AM   #15782
Sjoerd Bakker
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Raul. ....
As Trice said , riding Baja off road ALONE is not a good idea especially in summer when it can be very very hot in the interior . Also your bike choice , no doubt very good for dirt riding , would leave you stranded out of gas sooner or later off road and probably on the road too unless you have a big capacity tank .
For a first trip or solo trip pavement is the smart way to survive. The dirt may attract you but it would require extreme planning of gas stops, something better accomplished by support crews and group rides.Alone on dirt trails is looking for problems either mechanical or bodily injury from a fall

Summer is very survivable in Baja as long as you are prepared with water and gasoline , stick to pavement and never ride at night on or off road.
The Motorcycle Mexico CD set is excellent ( I am partial , my mug appears on there a lot) but it will be of little use to you if you are looking for specific riding routes for Baja.
These CDs are aimed more at convincing the wafflers that Mexico is a great and interesting country for riding, butfeel free to give Dr Benny some business .
For a first ride down Baja your paper road atlas is all you really need. Okay my hotels book too
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Old 05-29-2013, 11:14 AM   #15783
rockymountainoyster
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Baja Solo

Quote:
Originally Posted by tricepilot View Post

Solo is a great idea on pavement. Solo in the dirt, especially if you have limited experience, not so much a great idea.

Then again, you might be Lewis, or Clark. Wait!, they went as a team, with support. No GPS though.
Solo is a good idea on pavement but still risky. I think it is probably a real bad idea off road... too much that can happen, too remote.

A SPOT tracker is an essential piece of equipment but for it to be useful you have to subscribe to the additional services that they offer. Remember to wear it on you, not on the bike. You want to be found in an emergency.

The SPOT is conceptually great for calling the cavalry when and if you need them but what if there is no cavalry. My perception, having just done a highway ride in Baja is that the cavalry are few and far between. It does not matter if a SPOT notifies their emergency center and ten of your friends if there is no one that they can call to get help from. SPOT will cover two rescues of up to $50K for each event but you have to be a subscriber.

Some folks here are very big on MedJet Assist. Med Jet only provides air evacuation in the event of an emergency. If you get a foreign travel illness and accident policy see if it provides for air evacuation and what the limits are. There is no point in duplicating coverages but if you only have one MedJet is probably the one to have.

Lewis and Clark didn't have maps either, they were there to make them. They lost a lot of people.
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Old 05-29-2013, 11:44 AM   #15784
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Well Steve, he's got a better chance at gnarly terrain on a 400 EXC than a heavyweight yacht like a 1200GSA
Haha, Trice, isn't that a fact....That first pic is of a buddy's 1200GS getting some fuel due to it's measly 5 gal gas tank. The big KTM was even worse....

I enjoyed my R1200 GSA in Baja. Everything is a trade off-big, comfortable for two up, huge range v the ability to go to some really rugged off the beaten path places...I guess it all depends on what you what out of your ride, yes?



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Old 05-29-2013, 11:49 AM   #15785
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Baja Solo

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Originally Posted by AdventurePoser View Post

Baja is a great place for a first time Mexico visitor. People are friendly, the food is excellent, and there are numerous places to stay. Gas is fairly plentiful save one section that is approx 200 miles long...well, fuel is available here, but it's out of glass jar
These things are provisionally true. There are a lot of wide open spaces and you need to plan where you are going to stop and consider the range of your fuel tank. I have never seen Sjoerd's book but wish I had before I did my trip. The food is not universally excellent, the people are friendly but very different than on the mainland. In places that are typically overrun by loud and loutish gringos the people can be from cool to rude. They make assumptions about us and how we are going to act by their experience with us...kinda like we do with them. Numerous places to stay? Yes, but sometimes long distances between. There is a hotel in Catavina, out in the middle of nowhere and $97US/night. Sjoerd's book may have another one but I did not see it. There is gas out of jugs at Catavina. There is no gas between Guerrero Negro and Rosario de Arriba. There are two gas stations at Bahia de Los Angeles, a 40 mile ride from Mex1 on a very nice paved road. It will be hot there in the summer but is well worth visiting..

You should get the Guia Roji for Baja and Baja Sur. There is a lot of road between the US Border and the State Line at Guerrero Negro.

I can't emphasize enough the importance of hydration and electrolyte replacement. Lots of water and a couple of packets of EmergenC a day or Suero Electrolite that you can buy in many places. Gatorade is garbage.

Unless you really want to own one there is little purpose in having an expensive Garmin 650t for a venture into Baja if you have the maps. Even the AAA map will give you a good riding experience without too much risk of death in the desert. I saw a lot of dirt bikers on my ride up Baja, they were all traveling in packs with possibly some knowledge and experience. I did not see even one dual sport rider. Timing I guess.

My experience was that the food in Baja does not have the quality and variety of the food on the mainland. La Paz was certainly an exception and no doubt you can find good places. I am basing this on about an 8 day ride up the peninsula. I am looking forward to a return to explore more because I am sure that it is there.

I don't know where you are living right now but there are a lot of great places to ride in SoCal and the Four Corners area of AZ,NM,UT,CO to get yourself tuned up for a Baja Adventure.
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Old 05-29-2013, 01:38 PM   #15786
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post

My experience was that the food in Baja does not have the quality and variety of the food on the mainland..

David, did you ride Rt. 1 mostly? Looks like a handful of truckstops out there. Not much else between Baja and Cabo.

Zimmern and Bourdain have both done shows on the Baja food scene. Zimmern went diving a little further down the peninsula, but most of the foodie stuff is around the > border areas of Tijuana and Ensenada.

Of course, what would I know. I always wanted to open a North Carolina BBQ and Cincinnati chili joint around Santa Rosalillita but it looks like the Nautical Staircase has died, died, died.

Nautical Staircase:

http://articles.latimes.com/2004/jan...achtparadise25

Tijuana Food Blog:

http://tijuana.foodblog.com/

which looks like it's moving to:

http://tijuanafoodblog.com/
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Old 05-29-2013, 01:42 PM   #15787
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post
the people are friendly but very different than on the mainland. In places that are typically overrun by loud and loutish gringos the people can be from cool to rude. They make assumptions about us and how we are going to act by their experience with us...kinda like we do with them.

There used to be some stories on the RV forums about trouble in the Baja RV parking areas with low occupancy but the bottom line was that local folks would openly steal from the RVers. You'd never see that around this part of Mexico, the locals would lynch a petty thief.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post

I can't emphasize enough the importance of hydration and electrolyte replacement. Lots of water and a couple of packets of EmergenC a day or Suero Electrolite that you can buy in many places.
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Old 05-29-2013, 03:19 PM   #15788
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post
These things are provisionally true. There are a lot of wide open spaces and you need to plan where you are going to stop and consider the range of your fuel tank. I have never seen Sjoerd's book but wish I had before I did my trip. The food is not universally excellent, the people are friendly but very different than on the mainland. In places that are typically overrun by loud and loutish gringos the people can be from cool to rude. They make assumptions about us and how we are going to act by their experience with us...kinda like we do with them. Numerous places to stay? Yes, but sometimes long distances between. There is a hotel in Catavina, out in the middle of nowhere and $97US/night. Sjoerd's book may have another one but I did not see it. There is gas out of jugs at Catavina. There is no gas between Guerrero Negro and Rosario de Arriba. There are two gas stations at Bahia de Los Angeles, a 40 mile ride from Mex1 on a very nice paved road. It will be hot there in the summer but is well worth visiting..

You should get the Guia Roji for Baja and Baja Sur. There is a lot of road between the US Border and the State Line at Guerrero Negro.

I can't emphasize enough the importance of hydration and electrolyte replacement. Lots of water and a couple of packets of EmergenC a day or Suero Electrolite that you can buy in many places. Gatorade is garbage.

Unless you really want to own one there is little purpose in having an expensive Garmin 650t for a venture into Baja if you have the maps. Even the AAA map will give you a good riding experience without too much risk of death in the desert. I saw a lot of dirt bikers on my ride up Baja, they were all traveling in packs with possibly some knowledge and experience. I did not see even one dual sport rider. Timing I guess.

My experience was that the food in Baja does not have the quality and variety of the food on the mainland. La Paz was certainly an exception and no doubt you can find good places. I am basing this on about an 8 day ride up the peninsula. I am looking forward to a return to explore more because I am sure that it is there.

I don't know where you are living right now but there are a lot of great places to ride in SoCal and the Four Corners area of AZ,NM,UT,CO to get yourself tuned up for a Baja Adventure.

I guess I was lucky...ran into zero "loud and loutish" tourists. In fact, Baja was nearly deserted and the local economies were really hurting.

I had absolutely no bad encounters of any sort with any of the people I met, and the food was first class. For maps, I used the free AAA Baja map I picked up here in Glendora, and I consulted the Baja Almanac before leaving...

That being said, I cannot wait to get into mainland Mexico for a totally different experience...

Six dollar lobster and scallops in Loreto:
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Old 05-29-2013, 04:00 PM   #15789
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post



I can't emphasize enough the importance of hydration and electrolyte replacement. Lots of water and a couple of packets of EmergenC a day or Suero Electrolite that you can buy in many places. Gatorade is garbage.

Unless you really want to own one there is little purpose in having an expensive Garmin 650t for a venture into Baja if you have the maps. Even the AAA map will give you a good riding experience without too much risk of death in the desert. I saw a lot of dirt bikers on my ride up Baja, they were all traveling in packs with possibly some knowledge and experience. I did not see even one dual sport rider. Timing I guess.



I don't know where you are living right now but there are a lot of great places to ride in SoCal and the Four Corners area of AZ,NM,UT,CO to get yourself tuned up for a Baja Adventure.
Aloha Most of the older experienced off road guys have said just get the AAA map. So today I joined and have in my possession the highly regarded AAA Baja California map. Thanks for the emergenC advice. I believe in staying hydrated always. Funny thing I was just in Dolores Colorado two weeks ago picking up my Commando at Colorado Norton Works and put 500+ miles on the road in 4 days. I rode to Hoven Weep every day through the rain, hail, the cold and was it was a terrific time. I was also lucky enough to hang out with Sam Maganaro of Vincent Works in Dolores. I was there riding last August there also. The ride from Cortez to Telluride is one of the best roads I ever traveled on a road bike. It was so scenic and surreal. You are licky to live there.
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Old 05-29-2013, 04:53 PM   #15790
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymountainoyster View Post
Solo is a good idea on pavement but still risky. I think it is probably a real bad idea off road... too much that can happen, too remote.

A SPOT tracker is an essential piece of equipment but for it to be useful you have to subscribe to the additional services that they offer. Remember to wear it on you, not on the bike. You want to be found in an emergency.


Some folks here are very big on MedJet Assist. Med Jet only provides air evacuation in the event of an emergency. There is no point in duplicating coverages but if you only have one MedJet is probably the one to have.

Lewis and Clark didn't have maps either, they were there to make them. They lost a lot of people.
I am hoping I meet up with other riders somewhere along the way while in Mexico. From the sounds of it that might not happen much during the summer
In Hawaii I would ride up into the mountains and come back in the dark. I wiped it bad at nite once. Fractured ribs and bruises all over. Lights went out on the bike too. I was able to fix the light and get out to a hospital my self. 7 miles into the woods would not have been an impossible walk. The big big difference was I knew exactly where I was on Oahu unlike The Baja where I have never been.
The spot locater I guess is my best friend for the Baja. I inquired the costs. It is $99 a year for the subscription, $29 a year for the tracking device and $12 a year for the rescue. When they rescue you they only bring what is left of you to the nearest medical center. That is where the MedJet comes in handy. At $260.00 a year I can get air lifted to the hospital of my choice. So I could be brought from the baja to Queens Hospital on Oahu and have my Doctor take charge.
Thanks for the advice of keeping the spot locater on me and not the bike.
I have learned allot in the last 24hrs here @ advr. I have never blogged before and am figuring that out. Do you put pictures in photobucket and then put a link them to here to show them? That lobster meal looked great!
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Old 05-29-2013, 05:05 PM   #15791
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So I could be brought from the baja to Queens Hospital on Oahu and have my Doctor take charge.
Exactly that. You're doing pretty good for a short time on ADV
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Old 05-29-2013, 05:12 PM   #15792
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When they rescue you they only bring what is left of you to the nearest medical center.
Technically, the SPOT folks themselves don't get involved in rescuing you.

Based upon the "911" signal, the GEOS International Emergency Response Coordination Center works with "local emergency services" (which, internationally, can vary widely) who come to your location.
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Old 05-29-2013, 05:19 PM   #15793
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GEOS search and rescue
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Old 05-29-2013, 05:22 PM   #15794
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Who knows the wild story behind:

The Mexican Suitcase

Here is the story

Photographers and lovers of photography will love this tale
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Old 05-29-2013, 05:31 PM   #15795
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I saw on news this evening a Mormon mother of seven has been arrested in Hermisillo or someplace because authorities boarded the bus they were on, returning from a relative's funeral, and found some dope taped under her seat.

How dumb would this family, highly respected in Arizona with children, etc, have to be to tape dope plainly under a seat in a bus? This is such a setup the Mexican feds should be embarrassed to even consider it, and now she is in jail? If something like this can happen to a Mexican Mormon American, then no matter how safe you think it may be, you could be tagged as a scapegoat anywhere, anytime. I suppose this could be said of this country in certain areas, to be more fair. I've never been there, and I know several ride reports are illustrating how fun it can be, but this is so weird. When my corporate associates go into Reynosa from McAllen, we use blacked out vans and assumed names when we stay north of the border. I'm not sure safe is used in any conversations, lol. I wish it were otherwise, would love to see the country.

http://news.yahoo.com/ariz-mother-7-...182622556.html
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