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Old 12-12-2011, 04:38 AM   #5491
MikeMike
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Originally Posted by balloonman View Post
Others moved outside at restraunts people dinrd by candel and full moon light.
Se llama "el romance del temblor".
After every terremoto there is a spike in births 9 months later.
Nature at its finest? Or is it because the Televisa TV tower goes out?
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Old 12-12-2011, 04:57 AM   #5492
Sjoerd Bakker
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Originally Posted by Slowphil View Post
You sure your not thinking of steamboat Willy which was actually the first Mickey Mouse movie released?
No Phil,
I'm sure it wasn't "Steambboat Willy" the first Moving cartoon with Mickey in it and it also had sound but it had Mickey drawn in the early fashion
The one I remember was a paper comic book drawn in the more modern fashion and filled with the other Disney characters of Goofy , Pluto and the gang of toughs . It wasif not the first comic book that I got it certainly was the one of the two I remember from around 1952 when I was 5
The picture of the cartoon poster does look a lot like what the tug and Mickey are remebered as appearing.Interesting memories,
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Old 12-12-2011, 10:30 AM   #5493
PirateJohn
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Wouldn't it be more cost-effective for those in your community to simply pay for such entitlements as opposed to filtering their dollars through a federal bureaucracy?

:)

Interesting way of looking at things.

Personally, I have always felt that guv'mint can and should be as financially efficient as the private sector, although lately we as citizens don't seem to be trying hard enough to insist on lofty standards for guv'mint.

On the other hand I can see that there could potentially be some "quality" issues here. Never mind being provided with generic tequila instead of a reputable brand, the very thought of what the Feds might provide in the way of a "counselor" for conjugal visits kinda scares me.
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Old 12-12-2011, 12:31 PM   #5494
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As Gangs Move In on Mexico’s Schools, Teachers Say ‘Enough’

Pedro Pardo/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Teachers in Acapulco marched on Sept. 14 against an extortion attempt that has led scores of schools to close.

ACAPULCO, Mexico — The message is delivered by a phone call to the office of one school, a sheaf of photocopied papers dropped off at another, a banner hung outside a third.


The violence in Mexico has touched even elementary schools. In Ciudad Juárez, the man on the ground was killed when gunmen fired into a crowd at dismissal.


A woman mourned last month after another deadly shooting in Acapulco, which has become one of Mexico's most dangerous cities.

The demand is the same: teachers have until Oct. 1 to start handing over half of their pay. If they do not, they risk their lives.
Extortion is a booming industry in Mexico, with reported cases having almost tripled since 2004. To some analysts, it is an unintended consequence of the government’s strategy in the drug war: as the large cartels splinter, armies of street-level thugs schooled in threats and violence have brought their skills to new enterprises.
But the threat to teachers here in this tarnished tourist resort has taken the practice to a new level. Since the anonymous threats began last month, when students returned to classes after summer break, hundreds of schools have shut down.
“This isn’t about money, this is about life or death,” Alejandro Estrada, an elementary school teacher, said as he marched in protest with thousands of other teachers down Acapulco’s seafront boulevard last week. “If you don’t pay, you die.”
The word here, in the tough neighborhoods that tumble down the far side of the mountains lining the once-splendid bay, is that everybody is paying protection money: doctors, taxi drivers, local stores.
“They come every week, and you just pay because you never know,” whispered a flower seller in a market in Emiliano Zapata, a section of town where shuttered stores and padlocked schools testify to the fear.
“Everybody thinks he’s a hit man these days,” she added, refusing to give her name for fear that the people who collect less than $20 a week from her might find out that she had talked.
But unlike other groups, which appear to be suffering in silence, the teachers belong to a powerful union that can easily summon large numbers to protest. And over the past month, the strikes have spread to schools that have not received any threats, which shut in solidarity or in fear.
“We are all scared,” said a high school drawing teacher who would give her name only as Noemi. “We are targets because we have a salary that is a bit more stable than the rest.”
Nationwide, the surge in extortion was wrenched into painful focus last month after men suspected of working for the Zetas drug cartel set fire to a casino in the northern city of Monterrey, killing 52 people inside. State officials said the owners had balked when the Zetas raised the protection fee. While powerful criminal organizations like the Zetas have long made extortion their calling card, it has since taken on a life of its own.
For much of the five years since President Felipe Calderón began his crackdown against drug cartels, the government’s strategy has been to focus resources on their leaders and fracture the large organizations into smaller groups. But when violent gangs are cut loose from bosses who know how to move drugs to markets in the United States or are pushed out of traditional drug-running routes, they look for new lines of work, experts say. Extortion is among the least risky.
“Three or four armed men can call themselves Zetas and dedicate themselves to extortion,” Guillermo Zepeda, a security expert at Iteso, the Jesuit University in Guadalajara, said. In parts of Jalisco, his home state, he said, shopkeepers have closed their stores rather than pay protection money and instead live off money sent from relatives in the United States.
But extortion has now spread to many parts of Mexico that had been relatively distant from the drug wars, according to a study by Eduardo Guerrero, a security analyst at Lantia Consultores, a Mexico City consulting firm.
“Extortion is the best business after international drug trafficking,” Mr. Guerrero said in an interview. “If you are sufficiently violent you can generate regular income.”
The business “always resorts to intimidation,” he wrote in the study, published this month in the magazine Nexos, “and as a result, habitually exerts more violence than drug trafficking.”
Moreover, unlike most cartel-on-cartel crime, the violence extends to ordinary citizens. That entanglement with innocent civilians can quickly whip up community anger and is the reason some drug gangs, notably the powerful Sinaloa cartel, eschew the practice as bad for business.
The popular revulsion over extortion has become so powerful that the New People gang, a rival battling the Zetas, took pains during a recent display of grisly hubris to distance itself from the practice. The gang dumped 35 bodies, believed to be Zetas, on a main road near the port city of Veracruz on Tuesday with a sign saying, “People of Veracruz, don’t let yourselves be extorted. Don’t pay any more ‘quotas.’ ”
The official count showing a tripling of reported cases since 2004 represents only a fraction of the problem. México Evalúa, a group that compiles crime statistics, estimates that at least 80 percent of extortion cases go unreported, and notes that some states do not even bother to track them.
The Pacific port of Acapulco, now one of the country’s most dangerous cities, faces a dual threat: while warring cartels and smaller gangs continue to exact endless cycles of revenge, neighborhood thugs are terrorizing ordinary people.
Killings related to organized crime have multiplied almost eightfold here in the past two years, jumping sharply a year ago after the federal police arrested Édgar Valdez Villarreal, the American-born cartel boss known as “La Barbie” who had made Acapulco his base. By the first months of this year such killings had reached an average of 78 a month, by Mr. Guerrero’s count. “The violence is very difficult to stop once it crosses a threshold,” he added.
State officials have tried to play down the school closings, which are concentrated in public schools in some of the city’s poorest neighborhoods. But after an estimated 7,000 teachers protested on Wednesday, the Guerrero State governor, Ángel Aguirre, met with teachers on Thursday, promising a host of new security measures, including increased police patrols and the installation of panic buttons, telephones and video cameras in every school.
The teachers will decide Tuesday whether the government’s pledges are sufficient for them to feel safe returning to class.
Some analysts question whether the threats could even be carried out. Most criminal groups would avoid attacking a group as politically powerful as teachers.
“Extorting teachers is risky; it generates a great deal of social disgust,” said Raúl Benitez, a security specialist at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. “It’s just a stupidity.”
But among the teachers, everybody appears to have heard of a kidnapping, a car theft or a violent mugging, and they believe the threats.
On the first day of school at La Patria es Primero Elementary School (which translates roughly as “Country First”) in the Zapata neighborhood, three men sauntered in pretending to be parents and then drew guns on the teachers, making off with money, school documents and a laptop belonging to a fifth-grade teacher who would give only his first name, Ricardo.
The school’s payroll officer received a message demanding that she hand over information about teachers’ salaries and has left the city, Ricardo said. “It could just be low-level kids taking advantage,” he said, “but they are spreading a psychosis among the population.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/26/wo...pagewanted=all

Five severed heads left outside Mexican school

MEXICO'S DRUGS WAR



Mexican police have found five decomposing heads left in a sack outside a primary school in Acapulco.
Handwritten messages were also found, reportedly threatening the state governor as well as local drug lords.
It was not clear if the discovery of the heads and five decapitated bodies elsewhere in the city was linked to extortion threats against teachers.
Dozens of schools have been closed since last month after teachers went on strike over security concerns.
Police were called to a street in the Garita neighbourhood of Acapulco on Tuesday morning.
There they found a sack inside a wooden crate placed near the school, officers said.
Inside were the heads of five men, as well as the threatening messages.
Threats Police had earlier discovered five headless bodies in another part of the city, left either inside or near a burned-out vehicle.
Acapulco, on Mexico's Pacific coast, has seen several episodes of gruesome violence as drug gangs fight for control of the resort city.
The new school year has been disrupted
But as the government crackdown on cartels continues, criminal organisations here and in other parts of Mexico are fracturing and increasingly turning to extortion.
Last month, as the new school year began, dozens of teachers in Acapulco said criminal gangs had threatened them with violence if they did not hand over half their salaries from 1 October.
They and colleagues have since been on strike, leading to the closure of more than 100 schools.
Guerrero State Governor Angel Aguirre has promised a series of measures, including increased police patrols and the installation of security cameras and panic buttons in schools.
But teachers say they still fear for their own and pupils' safety.
One striking teacher told the BBC that although they welcomed the governor's proposals, they could not expect the situation to improve overnight.
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Old 12-12-2011, 12:41 PM   #5495
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That story above paints a picture of an ugly vicious cycle.
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Old 12-12-2011, 04:54 PM   #5496
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Looking at purchasing insurance for my bike while in Mexico. I have always used Sanborn's in the passed, but saw where Adventure Mexican Insurance (Platinum Travel Assistance Program) was recommended. The cost was in line with Sanborn's, but with much greater advertised coverage.
Advice, thought???
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:18 PM   #5497
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Is Mexico Safe

Just had my first experince down to Mexico...for the Point Rocky Rally in November.
Long story short drove over some junk on a dark road at night to my hotel and sliced the tire.

Went with Sanborn Insurance who said in the event...an English speaking adjuster would be on site and the bike would be transported back to Arizona.

Never happened...had to do it myself and a month later they finally got in touch.

Sure there are other Insurance companies which stand by thier claims
Sanborn Insurance out of Nogales Arizonia thumbs down NOT RECOMMENDED!
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:25 PM   #5498
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Originally Posted by Bionicflite View Post
Just had my first experince down to Mexico...for the Point Rocky Rally in November.
Long story short drove over some junk on a dark road at night to my hotel and sliced the tire.

Went with Sanborn Insurance who said in the event...an English speaking adjuster would be on site and the bike would be transported back to Arizona.

Never happened...had to do it myself and a month later they finally got in touch.

Sure there are other Insurance companies which stand by thier claims
Sanborn Insurance out of Nogales Arizonia thumbs down NOT RECOMMENDED!
Thanks..
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:36 PM   #5499
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bionicflite View Post
Just had my first experince down to Mexico...for the Point Rocky Rally in November.
Long story short drove over some junk on a dark road at night to my hotel and sliced the tire.

Went with Sanborn Insurance who said in the event...an English speaking adjuster would be on site and the bike would be transported back to Arizona.

Never happened...had to do it myself and a month later they finally got in touch.

Sure there are other Insurance companies which stand by thier claims
Sanborn Insurance out of Nogales Arizonia thumbs down NOT RECOMMENDED!
You got a flat/damaged tire and expected the ins. co. to come get your bike and take it back to AZ? Why didn't you just get another tire and ride back?

jimmex screwed with this post 12-12-2011 at 05:43 PM
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:46 PM   #5500
PirateJohn
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Originally Posted by _cy_ View Post
As Gangs Move In on Mexico’s Schools, Teachers Say ‘Enough’

.

Cy, this is one of those things where you sorta have to read between the lines a bit. This article actually came out some time ago. I scanned your version and I apologize if I mention something that is redundant.

Anyway, the title is "teachers say enough." That's another way of saying they don't totally take the threats seriously.

The first time that I read this article someone published a letter from the bad guys in it's entirety. In that letter the bad guys wanted 50% of the teachers' salaries, except for some guy they mentioned who had co-operated with them and was exempt. Want to bet how long that guy lasted once his identity was revealed to his peers and the competing cartels?

Evidently someone in the cartels managed to get a list of teachers. I'd take a wild guess and say that it's pretty common knowledge in many parts of Mexico, just like you could probably go to a school board or look on a web site in the USA for the same info. Anyway, they took a wild shot at the people on the list and tried to extort them in a somewhat amateur manner.

About the first time that this came out I happened to walk by a grade school in Progreso and it was business as usual.
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:53 PM   #5501
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For the regulars ... are we seeing less and less cartel violence along the border in the last few weeks? I was scanning Borderland Beat and the McAllen and Laredo papers and not seeing much.

Or are the journalists intimidated?

I would be interested in your opinions.

And Mike ... yeah, I saw that there was mischief in Veracruz. Hang in there Amigo.

The current thought is that I am going to get 3-4 weeks off beginning in a day or two so if anyone is interested in some border riding then let me know. Arte, I'd like to run down to wherever you guys want to go but I am not sure that I have the time although I might be up to running to Monterrey, Victoria, maybe Tampico and who knows.

I do want to get back to Progreso and Reynosa for a few days if at all possible.

Y'all let me know if you want to do some riding.
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Old 12-12-2011, 06:40 PM   #5502
tricepilot
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Originally Posted by Flagixxer View Post
Looking at purchasing insurance for my bike while in Mexico.
I'm suggesting you check into medevac/MedjetAssist type medical evacuation insurance. Two of my friends were flown home by these services this year alone - one from Moab and the other from Chihuahua, Mexico. The one out of Moab had MedjetAssist and the other was flown out by a medevac jet the specific company details of which I do not know yet.

I have MedjetAssist (about $250/year and $25/year for bike extraction) and won't go on any bike trip without it. Other companies have coverages as low as $4 per day (as I'm told) and can be purchased on a by-day term type plan and might be cheaper than MedjetAssist.

Both of the individuals I mentioned say over and over again that the extraction from their situations via airplane was priceless. In both instances they were transported to the nearby airport by ambulance and attended while in flight by medical personnel. The individual who crashed in Mexico was stabilized at a hospital in Hidalgo del Parral and "home" in a hospital in San Antonio just a little over 24 hours after the crash occured.

On the topic of bike insurance, there is another active thread on ADV that reports that a bike was stolen in Puerto Vallarta. With Mexico insurance coverage, not only might the bike be replaced but plane tickets home provided.

Note that neither Mexico bike insurance nor Medjet type insurance provides actual medical insurance, but that can be obtained also.

The rider who was airlifted out of Chihuahua had full coverage on his GS1200 and was obviously glad he did. The bike was destroyed in the crash he suffered outside of Balleza (between Hidalgo del Parral and Guachochi) and purported totalled by the insurance company (the process is still ongoing, settlement wise).

You will never talk to anyone who has had to use Mexico bike insurance or medevac extraction insurance who will say it wasn't worth it.

Finally, type "site:advrider.com medjet" into the Google search box (without the quotes) and sit back and read all the threads that come up whereby seasoned riders on this site have had unfortunate biffs and have used air evac service.

I recommend at minimum Mexico liability on the bike and at least the basic Medevac insurance (the purported $4/day coverage) that will be of great comfort if not necessity should you be the victim of a crash rendering you seriously hurt. There is only one MedjetAssist but more than a few medevac companies you can find on the net. If you do go with MedjetAssist, it's a no-brainer that for an extra 25 bucks, get the bike extraction coverage.
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Old 12-12-2011, 07:05 PM   #5503
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http://www.advrider.com/forums/showp...51&postcount=7

If you need further convincing, read this single post by Nata Harli, if not the entire thread that it is embedded in
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Old 12-12-2011, 07:06 PM   #5504
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Originally Posted by PirateJohn View Post
Cy, this is one of those things where you sorta have to read between the lines a bit. This article actually came out some time ago. I scanned your version and I apologize if I mention something that is redundant.

Anyway, the title is "teachers say enough." That's another way of saying they don't totally take the threats seriously.

The first time that I read this article someone published a letter from the bad guys in it's entirety. In that letter the bad guys wanted 50% of the teachers' salaries, except for some guy they mentioned who had co-operated with them and was exempt. Want to bet how long that guy lasted once his identity was revealed to his peers and the competing cartels?

Evidently someone in the cartels managed to get a list of teachers. I'd take a wild guess and say that it's pretty common knowledge in many parts of Mexico, just like you could probably go to a school board or look on a web site in the USA for the same info. Anyway, they took a wild shot at the people on the list and tried to extort them in a somewhat amateur manner.

About the first time that this came out I happened to walk by a grade school in Progreso and it was business as usual.
earlier today was talking to a mechanic from south America. he happened to have a customer from Mexico standing there watching.... so we are talking about my plans to tour the world... naturally couldn't pass up a chance to ask locals if it's safe riding across South America.

both said without hesitation... NO .. it's not safe.. then rattled off dangers, general instabilities across different countries. naturally I pointed out, isn't all the killings limited between cartels?

they answered NO... just 30 days ago in Acapulco, several teachers were killed by the cartels.
so when I got home did a search and got loads of hits... above was just two of the hits.
I had never heard of teachers getting shot in Acapulco before this.

---------------------
Lies, damned lies and statistics in Mexico's drugs war?

Janet Figueroa still weeps for her father. It is four months since he was gunned down in Xalapa, the state capital of Veracruz.
Eleven people died in the attack.
When she was taken to identify her father's body the police showed her a photo of him slumped in a black vehicle, with a large machine gun by his side. She says the state governor immediately announced that all of those killed were "criminals" who had "bitten the dust".



But Joaquin Figueroa was a mechanic who had left work that evening in a white pick-up truck with two colleagues. 'No proof' According to Ms Figueroa, he had never been involved in crime and did not own a gun.She accuses the authorities of manipulating the facts and figures.
The government statistics are not real”
Janet Figueroa
We were shown around his small dark apartment. It was littered with the detritus of a divorcee mechanic: half-empty food cartons, screws, bolts and bits of engines.
It is hardly the lifestyle of a man who made his living from the lucrative drugs trade.
Ms Figueroa says: "It is a matter of statistics, a way to show that they are actually doing something to fight crime in Veracruz."
She has asked the authorities for proof that her father was involved with the drug cartels. She is still waiting for an answer.
Her father is just one of tens of thousands of people to have been killed in a war on drug gangs declared by President Felipe Calderon.
Hundreds of failed polygraphs Undoubtedly the majority are criminals but the security forces and innocent bystanders have also died.
Police forces have become mired in accusations of corruption.
The state of Veracruz has just sacked some 1,000 officers who failed to pass lie-detector tests.
Some government officials are also accused of either under-reporting the number of deaths or deliberately changing the details of those killed to make it appear that the victims are criminals rather than civilians.
Now the authorities are under pressure to justify a policy that has turned relatively safe cities into battlegrounds.
Authorities are under pressure to justify a policy that has turned cities into battlegrounds
I met one restaurant owner in the port of Veracruz whose business was right next door to a house where 11 bodies were discovered. No-one knows who was responsible.
Such is the state of fear here that the man does not want to be named for fear of reprisals.
He says people are shocked by the violence that has come to Veracruz, a region that used to be immune from the troubles elsewhere.
He is emphatic on the question of who is to blame: "The government, 100%".
He, and many others here, feel caught between state and federal forces on the one hand and the drug cartels on the other.
Janet Figueroa is unusual not because she is the relative of a victim of violence, but because she has dared to speak out and campaign for what she calls "truth and justice".
Journalists have been killed, bloggers imprisoned, people have been threatened.
Ms Figueroa admits she and her family are scared and that they have been threatened, but she wants people to question the official version of events.
"I have to do it because it's a way to show that the government statistics and numbers are not real; that there are actually civilians killed in this drug war."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-15378399

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Old 12-12-2011, 07:11 PM   #5505
tricepilot
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Do you plan to tour the world or teach school in Acapulco?
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