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Old 09-14-2010, 01:14 PM   #496
WarLlama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammin
In relation to my above post, any dangers in running a front tire that's cupped?

It's a Kenda K761 with 15,900 miles. I've recently been through wet mud and about 2000 miles of dirt roads, handled just fine. Next leg is 3000 miles of asphalt. What do you say?

Definitely feels a bit funny on asphalt, but no handling issues. Can I get another 3000 miles out of it?



I think that would be fine on asphalt, it will wear down flat after a bit.
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Old 09-14-2010, 04:07 PM   #497
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WOXOF
Good Luck on your exams. Knock'em Dead Jay
thx

Quote:
Originally Posted by alphajory
More lube will help seat the tire easier. I use baby powder on the inside helps keep the tube cool and soap and water on the tire. The front usually seats in fairly easy with out to much pressure.

Glad to see you made the decision to change it out.
Yup, I put baby powder on the insides, but haven't done the soap bit. For the rear, it's no problem. Beat seats at just 30 psi. Dont do fronts that often (no punctures in the front tire, so far).

Yeah, no need to take unnecessary risks with the tire. There'll be time for that ahead.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter
We've all been through this same thing of the bead not fully seating.
If you can find a Llantera shop with good compressed air, go there.
Air down all the way, squirt dish soap or tire lube down in the gap best you can. Roll the bike around a bit or ride it flat a bit. This will get the soap down onto the tire bead and makes things slippery.

Now, re-inflate with using full power of the compressor. You can safely go to 70 or 80 PSI. Hopefully, the beads will POP! all the way around, on both sides. Good luck! (I hate unseated beads!!! )

Warning: Be sure to WASH OFF ALL soap and lube off the tire/wheel when you are done! I have "personal" experience with the results of NOT doing this!

!Suerte Jay ... Safe going!
Yeah, my little compressor is struggling after 50 psi. Will head to a llantera and get this guy fully seated. Slimey soap

What's the danger in running the tire without the bead completely seated? Just want to know, in case I'm not near a tire shop when I get a front flat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandino
Hey mate!!, great report and trip. If you plan to come to Paraguay, let me know!!, you got a place to stay in the lovely countryside of Paraguay, near Villarrica. Most riders do not come to Paraguay, but ask Motoadventuregal, she loved it.
Hey Sandino, yes, I definitely plan to come through Paraguay and I did hear about MAG's ride and stay with you. I'm going to apply for my visa in Sao Paulo and once I get it, I'll let you know. I plan to head up the Trans Chaco and enter Bolivia. Will be there around mid to end October.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WarLlama
I think that would be fine on asphalt, it will wear down flat after a bit.
That's what I thought too, but I've been lugging around a new front since Colombia, so decided better to throw it on now. Thx.

New chain and sprockets installed today and in the process of putting together a manual chain lube system
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:00 PM   #498
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Quote:
I stayed the night at this jungle resort near the pools, where I met a traveler from the States who worked a whole year at the South Pole, Antarctica. She was a safety inspector and also worked in the oil/gas industry in Nigeria. She was winding down in Guatemala and said how amazing it was to see precipitation fall from the sky as the snow/ice blows horizontally almost constantly at the pole. She was the 1231st person to ever spend a winter at the south pole where it's a constant -80F and 9 months of darkness.
Oh boy, she was having you on! The South Pole is not a particularly windy place. The rare day has 35 knots and snow doesn't blow horizontally constantly :-). It's dark for 6 months with plenty of twilight either end. South Pole reports seem to go the same way as many a ride report
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:53 PM   #499
Adv Grifter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammin
Yeah, my little compressor is struggling after 50 psi. Will head to a llantera and get this guy fully seated. Slimey soap

What's the danger in running the tire without the bead completely seated? Just want to know, in case I'm not near a tire shop when I get a front flat.
No real danger ... but sometimes you might "feel" the tire "bump" as it goes past the unseated point. At high speed can sometimes feel a bit rough. Other times you won't feel it at all. It can also cause uneven tire wear if not fully seated.

Suerte ... y vistas muy padre.
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Old 09-15-2010, 11:53 AM   #500
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boarder06

Oh boy, she was having you on! The South Pole is not a particularly windy place. The rare day has 35 knots and snow doesn't blow horizontally constantly :-). It's dark for 6 months with plenty of twilight either end. South Pole reports seem to go the same way as many a ride report
Hmmm. maybe working at the pole does strange things to your perception, haha.
In what capacity are you there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter
No real danger ... but sometimes you might "feel" the tire "bump" as it goes past the unseated point. At high speed can sometimes feel a bit rough. Other times you won't feel it at all. It can also cause uneven tire wear if not fully seated.

Suerte ... y vistas muy padre.
Thanks for explaining that. Still haven't gotten to it...
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Old 09-15-2010, 06:25 PM   #501
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Finished reading your report last night. Sounds like you are having a blast. Thanks for posting and looking forward to the updates.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammin
Hmmm. maybe working at the pole does strange things to your perception, haha.
In what capacity are you there?
Apparently it does, especially for Safety folks who never go outside :-)

I'm working on CMB telescopes down here and use the off time to prep for another big trip.
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Old 09-16-2010, 09:24 AM   #502
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boarder06
Finished reading your report last night. Sounds like you are having a blast. Thanks for posting and looking forward to the updates.


Apparently it does, especially for Safety folks who never go outside :-)

I'm working on CMB telescopes down here and use the off time to prep for another big trip.
Thx. Oh, how cool. I'm a big astrophyscis/astronomy enthusiast
Hope to visit a couple telescopes in the Atacama, including your sister ACT.

I see that Planck and XMM-Newton used the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect to detect a super cluster recently.
Does the SPT and ACT have higher resolution than Planck? I guess the space satellites are used for making all-sky maps and the ground-based telescopes are for more localized research, right?

Where's the next big ride to?
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Current Ride Report: Global South | Past Trips: CDR '09, Alaska '08, Mexico '07 | YouTube Videos
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Old 09-17-2010, 11:00 AM   #503
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Jammin Chain Lubrication System

During my break in Sao Luis, I made myself a manual chain lubrication system. I replaced the chain and sprockets after 16,000 miles and I've always read of other riders getting much more mileage out of their chains by using a chain lubrication system. It's the one thing I didn't get around to before starting the trip. And next year around Africa, it's going to be a lot hard to find or get the right chain and sprockets, so long life is important.

My design was inspired by the simplicity and effectiveness of the Loobman dual-sided delivery system, where two zip-ties are used in delivering the oil to both sides of the sprocket so that with the aid of centrifugal force, the lubrication gets to the o-rings on both sides of each chain pin as the sprocket spins. What Loobman says makes sense to me, that making sure the o-rings aren't rubbing dry against metal should ensure long chain life and the key is to keep both o-rings lubricated.

For the delivery system, I took a piece of thick fuel line and cut a hole in the top for the tube from the oil bottle to enter the chamber. Then I cut two slits angling towards the middle with exiting slits out the back of the chamber. I inserted a zip-tie into each slit and due to the angle of the slit, the zip-ties are touching against each other. The design isn't perfect, but this way there should always be tension on the zip-ties so that they're touching off the face of the sprocket. The zip-ties might plastically yield at some point, but that's part of the development process. And the beauty of using zip-ties is that once they wear off, replacement should be easy (I knew saving broken zip-ties would come in handy at some point).

The inside slits (on the sprocket side) were enlarged so that oil would flow easily on to the zip-ties. The system needs refining and even if oil doesn't travel down the zip-ties, it'll at least be spilling onto the chain and getting the job done.

The oil bottle has been placed on the frame such that while I'm riding, probably towards the end of the day, I can reach down with my left hand and give the bottle one or two squeezes and within half an hour all the oil should be emptied out hopefully onto the sprocket and worst case, at least on the chain.


The delivery chamber made from a piece of fuel line and the tube from the oil bottle. The zip-tie loop in the back is for securing and positioning the chamber next to the rear sprocket. Ideally, the chamber should be made of plastic, molded specifically for the task, but hey, I'm using what I've got.


The complete system with oil bottle, tube and delivery chamber. I asked a local mechanic (where I got my chain cut) where I could buy a bottle like that and he told me just to take his, with chain lubrication in it. Brazilians are so nice.


Wet test run after the RTV silicone had cured on the delivery chamber. This systems works simply with gravity and if the delivery chamber can be angled upwards, the oil should run down the zip-ties, but physical constraints on the bike didn't allow for this.


The Jammin Chain Lubrication System mounted on sanDRina. The tube is hard plastic and doesn't kink, allowing for the oil to flow unimpeded.


The delivery chamber in its position in front of the rear sprocket with the zip-ties touching the face of the sprocket. It works so far and I'll see how it holds up.
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Old 09-17-2010, 11:19 AM   #504
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Talking Video from Bolivia: Lago Titicaca

A taste of riding in Bolivia, around the immense and beautiful Lago Titicaca, the world's highest, largest lake situated at 3,800 m (12,500 ft).

This is from Copacabana, near the Peruvian border, heading to La Paz. The asphalt was perfect and the sun was shining strong with very little traffic. Fun to be hanging off the bike in the corners, wishing for my GSX-R



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Old 09-17-2010, 11:38 AM   #505
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Great video Jay. just love the music too. A Perfect fit.


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Old 09-17-2010, 01:17 PM   #506
bigdon
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Be sure and put an air hole in your feed line so the oil in the tube will drain.
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Old 09-17-2010, 03:15 PM   #507
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Just a personal preference but i find a well oiled chain and dusty road don't mix. The oil on the chain collects vast amounts of dirt and you end up with quite a mess. I also think it contributes to more wear that less as a result. Dry lubricates are best but then not sure where you would find them in SA
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Old 09-17-2010, 05:26 PM   #508
Adv Grifter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammin
During my break in Sao Luis, I made myself a manual chain lubrication system. I replaced the chain and sprockets after 16,000 miles and I've always read of other riders getting much more mileage out of their chains by using a chain lubrication system. It's the one thing I didn't get around to before starting the trip. And next year around Africa, it's going to be a lot hard to find or get the right chain and sprockets, so long life is important.

My design was inspired by the simplicity and effectiveness of the Loobman dual-sided delivery system, where two zip-ties are used in delivering the oil to both sides of the sprocket so that with the aid of centrifugal force, the lubrication gets to the o-rings on both sides of each chain pin as the sprocket spins. What Loobman says makes sense to me, that making sure the o-rings aren't rubbing dry against metal should ensure long chain life and the key is to keep both o-rings lubricated.
Good luck with the new oiling system. I've forgotten what brand/type of chain you had on before? 16K miles? The stock DR chain usually does that distance, not much more. It is a mid quality O ring DID ... far from DID's best, but adequate.

As I've preached about before ... a DID 525 VM-2 X-ring chain, kept reasonably clean, will go to 25K miles on a DR650. Same on a Vstrom or a Tiger or nearly any bike. It helps to replace the counter shaft sprocket at about 10 to 12K miles. If you do this the VM-2 will go to 25K. I've never used an oiler on my DR650 .... but have used them before on my 1st Vstrom. (also built my own gravity feed oiler)

IMHO, its more important to keep the chain clean ... rather than super oiled. Off road, I run my chains dry ... or maybe just a bit of WD40. Off road with an oiler you will pick up a lot of grit and sand ... which will become a grinding paste, collect around the front sprocket and make a mess. I went through all this back in the 80's on dirt bikes and doing long Baja rides. No Bueno.

On road the Oiler will be just fine ... but the fact is, your chain just does not need constant oiling unless you are riding in constant rain. O and X ring chains seal the link pins with internal lube. Many experienced riders use NO LUBE (other than WD40) at all, still get HIGH MILEAGE. I prefer light oiling for road riding, as this allows a quieter/smoother running chain and protects the roller face from the sprocket teeth.

Chain/sprocket life has a lot to do with how and where the bike is ridden. Wheelies and hard riding are hard on chains. Riding in rain is hard on chains. Riding constantly off road is hard on chains. On a touring bike your chain should last nearly forever ... if you take care of it.

Using a cheap chain is penny wise/pound foolish. Also, there are many crap sprockets out there which will eat your new chain UP. I like stock Suzuki ones for the DR, same on my V-stroms.

I started getting anal about chains and chain life back in 1997 with my 1st Triumph Tiger (two more Tigers since), 2 Vstroms, 3 DR650's since 2002. Total miles in this period is over 200,000 miles on all bikes. (also been running 2 or 3 other bikes concurrently with all these. Mostly dirt and Dual sport bikes)

Try the Oiler. At the end of the day ... feel lube on the chain. Is it Gritty?
Full of sand? Touring I wipe my chain down everyday and lightly re-oil ... this especially after a day off road.

!Gracias por su reporte ... muy padre!
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Old 09-18-2010, 07:31 AM   #509
Jammin OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WOXOF
Great video Jay. just love the music too. A Perfect fit.

Thx

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdon
Be sure and put an air hole in your feed line so the oil in the tube will drain.
Hmm, good idea. Let me see where that would be best...

Quote:
Originally Posted by alphajory
Just a personal preference but i find a well oiled chain and dusty road don't mix. The oil on the chain collects vast amounts of dirt and you end up with quite a mess. I also think it contributes to more wear that less as a result. Dry lubricates are best but then not sure where you would find them in SA
For sure, yes, I'm aware oily chains on a dirt road can introduce more grit, but this is more for asphalt and rain riding. and I'm trying to be cost effective here (for the long run), so now I can use any oil, even engine oil and it should be ok.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter
Good luck with the new oiling system. I've forgotten what brand/type of chain you had on before? 16K miles? The stock DR chain usually does that distance, not much more. It is a mid quality O ring DID ... far from DID's best, but adequate.

As I've preached about before ... a DID 525 VM-2 X-ring chain, kept reasonably clean, will go to 25K miles on a DR650. Same on a Vstrom or a Tiger or nearly any bike. It helps to replace the counter shaft sprocket at about 10 to 12K miles. If you do this the VM-2 will go to 25K. I've never used an oiler on my DR650 .... but have used them before on my 1st Vstrom. (also built my own gravity feed oiler)

IMHO, its more important to keep the chain clean ... rather than super oiled. Off road, I run my chains dry ... or maybe just a bit of WD40. Off road with an oiler you will pick up a lot of grit and sand ... which will become a grinding paste, collect around the front sprocket and make a mess. I went through all this back in the 80's on dirt bikes and doing long Baja rides. No Bueno.

On road the Oiler will be just fine ... but the fact is, your chain just does not need constant oiling unless you are riding in constant rain. O and X ring chains seal the link pins with internal lube. Many experienced riders use NO LUBE (other than WD40) at all, still get HIGH MILEAGE. I prefer light oiling for road riding, as this allows a quieter/smoother running chain and protects the roller face from the sprocket teeth.

Chain/sprocket life has a lot to do with how and where the bike is ridden. Wheelies and hard riding are hard on chains. Riding in rain is hard on chains. Riding constantly off road is hard on chains. On a touring bike your chain should last nearly forever ... if you take care of it.

Using a cheap chain is penny wise/pound foolish. Also, there are many crap sprockets out there which will eat your new chain UP. I like stock Suzuki ones for the DR, same on my V-stroms.

I started getting anal about chains and chain life back in 1997 with my 1st Triumph Tiger (two more Tigers since), 2 Vstroms, 3 DR650's since 2002. Total miles in this period is over 200,000 miles on all bikes. (also been running 2 or 3 other bikes concurrently with all these. Mostly dirt and Dual sport bikes)

Try the Oiler. At the end of the day ... feel lube on the chain. Is it Gritty?
Full of sand? Touring I wipe my chain down everyday and lightly re-oil ... this especially after a day off road.

!Gracias por su reporte ... muy padre!
Yup, knew you'd pipe in with your sermon about DID I've used RK chains up to now and had good success. The chain I just put on is all I could find here, an Iris o-ring (from Spain). I use standard steel sprockets, JT.

I listened to your advice about keeping the chain clean and do it whenever I can. For off-road, as you say, I wont be using the chain lube much. I need to figure out how to mount another bottle somewhere with some diesel so that I can clean the chain where ever I am.

I also thought of an automatic chain cleaner, basically the same design as the chain luber, but a separate system with diesel in it. So instead of lubing the chain all the time, I could squirt diesel on the chain as it's running and that should make it clean, right? What do you think of that?

Oh and I reseated the bead of the front tire. Used lots of soap and 80 psi and it's seated nicely all the way around. thx.
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Old 09-18-2010, 07:37 AM   #510
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Getting ready to hit the road again tomorrow. 3 week break here in Sao Luis has re-energized both sanDRina and I. Felt nice to share an apartment with a close friend and get lots of cooking done :) I've washed almost everything that could be washed, including my sleeping bag, helmet, riding gear and anything else coated with the red dust of the Transamazonica Not that I don't like dirt, but everything was getting nasty to touch.

Bike is feeling fresh with new front tire, new chain and sprockets, oil change, air filter refresh, valve check, new spark plugs, adjusted air/fuel mixture on the carb, checked tightness of all bolts and installed a self-made chain lubrication system.

My care package from my sister in the States with a new clutch kit and other spares is going to take another 2 weeks to arrive in Sao Luis, so my friend is going to send it back down to Sao Paulo when it gets here. Hopefully I don't loose another clutch disc, since I have no more spares and I couldn't find any more here. I'll have to resort to the steel discs if it happens on the way to Sao Paulo.

I'll be heading to Recife first, on the coast and then taking beach roads south to Salvador. From there, I'll head inland to Lencois and Chapada Diamantina, a beautiful national park and then head down to Belo Horizonte and Sao Paulo. After my exams, I'll head to Rio for a while before turning back and heading for Paraguay and Bolivia, once more (depending on visas).
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