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Old 11-23-2010, 09:16 AM   #676
Jammin OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by top_dog
Man, its soo funny to see our own culture by the eyes of an foreigner!
Things that are so common to us and for you are so unusual!
Keep it coming!!!
It's all about perspective, eh? If you go to India, you'd be amazed at all the cows roaming around the streets and maybe even the elephants, but totally normal for us

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rider14
Good luck, Jay! Feel better and keep us posted.
- Dan
thx man, feeling much better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linhares
Hey, Jay,
are you feeling better?
I'm loving the pictures of Brazil.
Abraços,
Linhares
Hey Linhares, I'm feeling much better today. Lots of tylenol and sleep did the trick. Ready to get back on the road tomorrow.

Brake Issue: I replaced the rear pads with new ones and the sound went away. All the springs were in tact and nothing looked out of place. I'm not convinced that fixed the issue, but let's see how it goes.
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Old 11-23-2010, 09:20 AM   #677
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Talking Interview on SideStandUp.com

Going to be interviewed on online motorcycle radio show SideStandUp.com tonight at 8:20 pm ET Listen live from the below website:

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Old 11-23-2010, 12:21 PM   #678
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammin

Enjoying a relaxing afternoon with Kavin at the beach over some tasty crabs. He grew out his hair and I cut it all off, much to the dismay of both our mothers, but we'd average out ok :p
I lol'd.
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Old 11-23-2010, 12:35 PM   #679
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I lol'd.
at the contrast in hair or the 2 guys holding a crab?
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Old 11-23-2010, 02:32 PM   #680
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Quote:
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at the contrast in hair or the 2 guys holding a crab?
The remark actually.
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Old 11-24-2010, 04:28 PM   #681
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Done with the flat plains of Argentina and I can now smell the sweet mountain air of the Andes, beckoning right behind the city of Cordoba. I've been having mountain withdrawal these past few months and looking forward to climbing back up the altitudes
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Old 11-25-2010, 09:47 PM   #682
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I did a similar portion of Bolivia earlier this year. My buddy on a KLR and me on a KTM 640 adventure went to Riberalta from La Paz and back. We managed to make it there in two days and back in the same amount of actual riding time!!! However, with all that shaking we needed 5 welds between the 2 bikes afterward. It seems like I replaced every bolt on the entire friggen beast because of the vibration. Anyway, it's nice to know we did in fact blaze a trail at a fast clip, but if we had it to do again I think your pace would have been much more desirable.

The biggest regret of my trip is not continuing onto Brazil and following your route. Live it up for me, will ya haha.

If you really want to see the Salar go north from Salta, Argentina to the border town of Villazon, Bolivia/La Quicha, Argentina. From there you can take an AMAZING ride through Tupiza to Uyuni and the Salar. The scenery along this route has some incredible blues, reds, and greens in the rocks and some crazy formations. Heading from Uyuni to Chile is really easy compared to the crazy adventure you've already had :) It's a long day's ride from Cordoba to La Quicha (pavement), 100k to Tupiza, and 260k to Uyuni (all nice dirt, no sand). Oh yea, the road from Salta to Jujay through La Caldera was the greatest stretch of pavement I've seen on earth. Trucks are prohibited because it's so narrow, so it's about 30 miles of incredibly twisty bliss through the forest and lakes.

Edit: Whoops, after finishing this thread I see you're already heading to Bolivia, so have a great trip! If you're going to head north of Uyuni the road to Potosi is great once you get about 30k outside of Uyuni. If you're still looking for tires I found some in Both Sucre and La Paz.

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Old 11-26-2010, 09:25 AM   #683
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Great tips on those roads! I don't know the Uyuni but have seen a few of the roads between La Quiaca, Salta and Jujuy. Fantastic.

PS: I think the border town is called "La Quiaca" not la Quicha. Here's a sign at the border from a few years ago.
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Old 11-26-2010, 01:50 PM   #684
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have listened to you since your started on sidestandup.now i found this.
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Old 11-28-2010, 06:46 AM   #685
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Originally Posted by cu260r6
Anyway, it's nice to know we did in fact blaze a trail at a fast clip, but if we had it to do again I think your pace would have been much more desirable.

The biggest regret of my trip is not continuing onto Brazil and following your route. Live it up for me, will ya haha.

If you really want to see the Salar go north from Salta, Argentina to the border town of Villazon, Bolivia/La Quicha, Argentina. From there you can take an AMAZING ride through Tupiza to Uyuni and the Salar. The scenery along this route has some incredible blues, reds, and greens in the rocks and some crazy formations. Heading from Uyuni to Chile is really easy compared to the crazy adventure you've already had :) It's a long day's ride from Cordoba to La Quicha (pavement), 100k to Tupiza, and 260k to Uyuni (all nice dirt, no sand). Oh yea, the road from Salta to Jujay through La Caldera was the greatest stretch of pavement I've seen on earth. Trucks are prohibited because it's so narrow, so it's about 30 miles of incredibly twisty bliss through the forest and lakes.

Edit: Whoops, after finishing this thread I see you're already heading to Bolivia, so have a great trip! If you're going to head north of Uyuni the road to Potosi is great once you get about 30k outside of Uyuni. If you're still looking for tires I found some in Both Sucre and La Paz.
Wow, you guys were flying over all that washboard. Yeah, I'm doing the turtle pace, making sure I make it to the end
Im glad I did the Bolivian part, as it prepped me for the TransAmazonica. It's for sure an experience, a long journey where once you get in, there's only one way out at the other end.

Yup, I know about the awesome road from Salta to Jujuy, will be filming it

Once I'm in Bolivia, I need to go to Santa Cruz to buy some tires and a chain. But looks like the route from Tupiza to Uyuni shouldn't be missed. Is the route from Potosi to Uyuni also a not-to-be-missed kind of road? I'm thinking this is going to be my route through Bolivia:

Cross at Villazon or Bermejo, head to Tarija then Villamontes, up to Santa Cruz, then to Sucre, Potosi, down to Tupiza and then up to Uyuni across salar to San Pedro da Atacama.

Am I missing anything by not doing the Potosi to Uyuni route?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adv Grifter
Great tips on those roads! I don't know the Uyuni but have seen a few of the roads between La Quiaca, Salta and Jujuy. Fantastic.
Nice pic from the border and cool destination with mileage. That's a KLR?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rcook52459
have listened to you since your started on sidestandup.now i found this.
Cool, thanks for following along
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Old 11-28-2010, 06:54 AM   #686
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I spent 2 days in the small lakeside town of Villa Carlos Paz next to Cordoba and went on a nice loop up into the nearby mountains to do a real shake down ride after all the maintenance work over the past few weeks. I rode about 80 kms of dirt and then about 100 kms of high speed sweepers. She was feeling loose and responsive in the dirt and stable and racy through the twisties. I'm feeling happy about the bike


Riding the dirt road between Villa Carlos Paz and Taninga in northwest Argentina. My first dirt since the TransAmazonica. It's been too long.

I'm in Tucuman now, after 600 kms of straight, hot roads through the flats of Argentina. Heading into the mountains after this, north to Salta.
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Old 11-28-2010, 04:31 PM   #687
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Brazil, Part 6: Salvador da Bahia

September 23 - 24, 2010

I spent two days in Salvador da Bahia, the center of Afro-Brazilian culture and the first colonial capital of Brazil. It's the third biggest city in the country and is considered Brazil's capital of happiness due to its lively nature and friendly populace. I connected with Lara thru CouchSurfing and she showed me around her beautiful city.


It got dark as I rolled into the city and I had to capture this awe-inspiring glow from the setting sun over the beach on the eastern part of the peninsula that Salvador sits on.


Old colonial buildings in Pelourinho, the historic center of Salvador. The city was founded in 1549 by early Portuguese settlers and is the site of the first slave market in the 'new world' with African slaves arriving to work on the sugarcane plantations. The name Pelourinho refers to the whipping post in the central plaza that was used to discipline unruly slaves.


Pelourinho is a very pleasant place to walk around nowadays and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It was considered unsafe a few years ago, along with the city of Salvador, but things are changing for the better.


Convento e Igreja de São Francisco (São Francisco Church and Convent), built by the Franciscan Order that arrived here in 1587 but was soon destroyed when the Dutch took over these parts of Brazil. It was slowly rebuilt over a long time. Along with numerous churches, another characteristic of Pelourinho are the pastel-hued buildings.


Cruz Caída, the Fallen Cross, a sculpture dedicated to the old cathedral, which was torn down to make way for a tram line.


Catedral Basilica de São Salvador in the main plaza of Pelourinho called Terreiro de Jesus. The church is a good example of baroque architecture in South America and was built initially as a Jesuit school.


Catching an impromptu demonstration of Capoeira on Praça da Sé and being hounded for a cash donation after taking this picture. Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian form of dance mixed in with martial arts from the cultures of the West African slaves that were brought to Brazil. Its signature moves include fluid acrobatic acts and stylized sparring.


People giving reverence to a statue of Zumbi dos Palmares, the last leader of the quilombo republic of Palmares. Quilombos were settlements of escaped slaves in the interior of Brazil and their leaders, including Zumbi are considered heroes in Brazil as they represent democracy, freedom and black pride. The day he was betrayed and beheaded by the Portuguese, November 20, is the Dia da Consciência Negra (Black Awareness Day). Previously, I thought this aspect of Brazilian history was mainly the pride of African-Brazilians, but seeing white and mixed-race Brazilians giving reverence to him shows that all of Brazil respects the fight by the slaves against the Portuguese and I guess it also demonstrates how Brazil is accepting of all cultures, having immigrants from various places around the world.


The Elevador Lacerda connecting the Cidade Alta (upper city) with the Cidade Baixa (lower city). Pelourinho in the Cidade Alta sits on a ridge that drops to the sea at the coast. The elevator was constructed in 1869 to facilitate movement between the two parts of the city. At the bottom of the elevator, which is 72 m (191 ft) tall, is the Mercado Modelo, a market building and from up top here, one has views of the Baía de Todos os Santos (All Saints Bay) and the island Fort of São Marcelo, where we headed next.


Taking a boat ride with Lara, who was an excellent host for my short time in Salvador.


The boat took us to the circular Forte de São Marcelo, about 300 m (984 ft) from shore, built on a coral reef.


It was constructed in 1623 by the military architect Francisco Frias and charged with the role of protecting Salvador from foreign attacks.


Looking inside one of the chambers in the fort where prisoners were kept for solitary confinement.


We sat on the fort wall and had some good conversations while watching the sun set.


The pink hues from the setting sun shining down on an old canon, aimed at incoming enemies.


A panoramic view of Salvador with Pelourinho on the left and the newer part of the city and the tip of the peninsula on the right.
Click here to see the high resolution version.


Leaving the fort on the last boat with the sun setting behind it.


The golden rays of light reflecting on the waters of the Centro Náutico da Bahia.


Lara introducing me to the traditional street food of Bahia at an Acarajé stand, where the women who serve it wear all white and are referred to as 'Baianas'.


Acarajé is made with a dough of black-eyed peas (the band of the same name was going to be touring Brazil soon). The dough is deep-fried in dendê (palm oil) and is typically served with Vatapá, a spicy mix of shrimp and coconut milk. It was very tasty.


That evening, Lara's mom was going to a session at a Braham Kumari school, so I tagged along and had a chat with one of their teachers. This religious movement was started by the Indian spiritual leader, Lekhraj Kripalani in the 1930's. His teachings have been spread around the world and focus on open-eyed meditation (by staring at the light at the center of the image) and principles of knowledge, practice and service. They believe in dualism (mind-body separation), which I debated with the teacher about.


Having a snack of pão de queijo (cheese bun), a typical small bread of Brazil, which is common on the breakfast table. The taste is amiable because the inside is chewy and moist with a cheesy flavor. It's very easy to get hooked on them.


The next morning, Lara's mom was going for a walk in the state park and asked if I'd like to come along. Before heading out, she prepared a veggie drink loaded with dark greens and healthy ingredients like sesame seeds, an apple and other good things for your body. It felt like a much-needed detoxification after eating so much meat recently (I'm not a heavy red meat eater). With some vitamins and nutrients gulped down, we headed out to the park.


Parque da Cidade Joventino Silva (City Park of Joventino Silva), a green space in the city harboring the last of the Mata Atlântica (Atlantic Rainforest).


A huge bamboo tree in the park.


There was a trail leading deep inside, with many residents walking or jogging and soaking in the respite from the concrete jungle that surrounds this natural jungle.


Plants growing from the trunk of another tree. The air was moist and damp, feeling like a proper rainforest.


The vegetation was thick and the air was alive with numerous bird calls. What a nice way to start the day.


With Lara's mom, Lara and her sister, Liz, who plays bass guitar for an all-girl band in Los Angeles called Ladysugar.


Their lovely home with nice views of the ocean.


Liz wanted to come along on this tricycle as I was exiting the parking garage. Thanks for the nice time in Salvador, ladies.
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Old 11-29-2010, 12:18 PM   #688
cu260r6
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Originally Posted by Jammin
Yup, I know about the awesome road from Salta to Jujuy, will be filming it
Awesome! Please post that. I drove it at dusk, and it was too dark to get any good pics except one I got of the 'Racing' sign which is very fitting.

Santa Cruz is a bit underwhelming, and the shops in Sucre and Potosi had tires for my KTM 640 Adventure and 520 chains, so no need to go that far north unless you want to.

Tupiza to Uyuni via San Vincente was a road I consider not to be missed, and the scenery is quite different than going from Uyuni to San Pedro, Chile. San Vincinte is where the actual Butch Cassidy and Sundance Kid were killed, so that was a highlight but perhaps just for me.

The route from Potosi to Uyuni is not that special. When I said 'great' I was talking about the condition of the surface. They've paved the last 40k and groomed the dirt for the next 150k in anticipation of paving, so I was able to get up to 110k in spots. The 30k outside of Uyuni was cool, but if you come down from Oruro or over from Tupiza you'll see better stuff. I came the other direction, so I broke through the top of the mountains and saw the salt arrayed all across the horizon which was a cool first glimpse of the salar.

The mine tours in Potosi are really touristy, but REALLY worth it. You can buy full sticks of dynamite for less than $2 each. Buy several, don't give them all away, and set them off when you're out in the middle of nowhere!!!

Going villazon, Tupiza, Uyuni, Potosi, Sucre, Potosi, Oruro, Uyuni would allow you to see everything I know of and buy tires/chain in Sucre/Tupiza. If they didn't have it there it's an easy pavement ride from Potosi to Sucre to Santa Cruz. But heck, I've only been there once myself, so you're guess is as good as mine.

Buy as much as you can carry in Bolivia. Parts and tires especially are much more expensive in Chile and Argentina.

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Old 12-01-2010, 10:24 AM   #689
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I kinda dig Santa Cruz, but if youre burned out on big cities, skip it. Santa Cruz feels more like Brazil than Bolivia. The women in Santa Cruz, well, amazing.

You will like Sucre for sure. Find the Honda Hi-Store in Sucre. They have a webpage. Gonzalo is the owner and he will have tires, tubes, oil, whatever you need. Or you can buy stuff in La Paz as well as there is an area with all the moto shops near the touristy part of town, but I forget exactly where it is, just ask around.

Potosi to Uyuni is about half paved. It starts out paved, turns into decent dirt road, then has another paved section a bit before you get into Uyuni. There is tons of construction and tons of trucks, and constant a dust cloud due to the traffic. So if you can plan to do that stretch on a Sunday, it will be much more enjoyable for sure, day and night difference actually.

suerte.
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Old 12-01-2010, 04:31 PM   #690
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Originally Posted by crashmaster View Post
I kinda dig Santa Cruz, but if youre burned out on big cities, skip it. Santa Cruz feels more like Brazil than Bolivia. The women in Santa Cruz, well, amazing.

suerte.
Hey Vince, yeah, I'm so done with all the concrete from the past few weeks, but if it means bike parts, ok, have to do it. Main reason I want to go to Santa Cruz is finding a 525 chain, that too a good one. I put on a crappy Iris chain only about 7,500 miles ago and it's already loosening up every couple hundred miles. I'll contact the store in Sucre and see if they have a chain for me.

Since I want to do Tupiza to Uyuni, I'm thinking Sucre > Potosi > Tupiza > Uyuni.

Anyone know what the road from Potosi to Tupiza is like?

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Awesome day of riding today. First, the narrow Deals Gap kinda road from Salta to Jujuy. Fun, but too tight for a big bike. Would be perfect in a Mini Cooper Then the colorful Quebrada de Humahuaca, north of Jujuy to Pumamarca and the seven colored mountain. From there, a beautiful set of hairpin turns peaking at 4,200 m (13,780 ft) and down to the Salinas Grandes - salt flats (much smaller than Uyuni), but nice nonetheless. Towards the end of the day, I got a flat. Couldn't find the culprit, but new tube is working fine in there.

Heading for the Bolivian border tomorrow at Bermejo/Aguas Blancas to Tarija.
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