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Old 03-15-2011, 08:17 PM   #841
DRRambler
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You've covered so many miles, it's been an amazing journey so far Jay and so much more to go.

Got my T-Shirt in the mail today!

Thanks for sharing your adventure.

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Old 03-15-2011, 09:20 PM   #842
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Couldn't make pay pal work on the T shirt site ... no way to contact the t-shirt company.
Bye Bye ... it punted me off after I gave all personal info including Pay Pal account and password. Nice.
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Old 03-16-2011, 11:48 AM   #843
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Welcome in Europe!

After his trip over the ocean Jay arrived yesterday in Hamburg.
We picked him up, support him with new tires and after a short night
he start´s his trip to Paris - Madrid and Africa!

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_q.../Jammin015.jpg

Have a good ride and much fun!



Mike
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Old 03-16-2011, 11:52 AM   #844
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Welcome in Europe!

After his trip over the ocean Jay arrived yesterday in Hamburg.
We picked him up, support him with new tires and after a short night
he start´s his trip to Paris - Madrid and Africa!



Have a good ride and much fun!



Mike
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Old 03-16-2011, 03:44 PM   #845
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Europe

Hi Jay

you arrived ..... a very warm WELCOME to Europe

Very nice that paperwork in Hamburg was easy and not a big hassle

the weather is not too bad, hope you enjoy the ride south

@ Mike from Nord Twins .... well done


Have fun and happy trails
Thomas
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Old 03-16-2011, 04:05 PM   #846
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Long day on the highways across Europe. 900 kms from Hamburg to Paris in 12 hrs. Was 1 degree C in the morning, but warmed up as I went south. It was a pleasure to drive on the Autobahn, not for speed with the DR (130 kph my max), but to see such good road manners from everyone - no left lane squatters, following all the speed limit signs, including the 'no speed limit' sign. Was wishing for my gixxer

Thanks a lot to Mike and Jens in Hamburg. They helped me mount the Heidenau K60 and they handled well on the road today.

Met up with an old friend from Chicago days here in Paris. Applying for Maroc visa tomorrow and then will post some pix and video.

Thanks for the comments will reply soon
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Old 03-16-2011, 10:11 PM   #847
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trying to find a road you took???

jay,

just found your thread...back in august last year you took the canon del pato, do you remember your route, did you take the road east to west and head into caraz and did it have a road number, can you PM me if you have it plotted or at least tell me your starting point, i leave sunday for ushuaia and this looks like a great diversion as i head north and get to peru

paul - dmh65
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Old 03-17-2011, 06:05 AM   #848
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I made 3 videos and processed lots of photos on the ship. Will be posting it over the coming days. Here's the Lagunas video:

6 days across remote high-altitude southwestern Bolivia in a strange Mars-like landscape. The toughest riding I've done with lots of deep sand and rocks for 500 kms. Epic views and camping. Average altitude was around 4,000 m (13,000 ft), peaking at 5,000 m (16,400 ft).

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Old 03-17-2011, 06:12 AM   #849
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Originally Posted by dmh65 View Post
jay,

just found your thread...back in august last year you took the canon del pato, do you remember your route, did you take the road east to west and head into caraz and did it have a road number, can you PM me if you have it plotted or at least tell me your starting point, i leave sunday for ushuaia and this looks like a great diversion as i head north and get to peru

paul - dmh65
Hey Paul, yes, definitely do the Canon del Pato, fantastic ride. I went West to East from the Coast to Caraz. A few km north of Chimbote, there's a turn off from the town of Santa. It's paved till Chuquicara. Then don't cross the river on the bridge, but go straight and the off-road starts and just keep following it and you will roll into Caraz. Dont think it had a number. Ask the locals for the road with all the tunnels.
Here's a google map showing the off-road part of the route. It's longer, but gmap wont route the whole thing.
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Current Ride Report: Global South | Past Trips: CDR '09, Alaska '08, Mexico '07 | YouTube Videos
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Old 03-17-2011, 06:24 AM   #850
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So cool
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Old 03-17-2011, 08:20 AM   #851
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Brazil, Part 11: Revisiting Picinguaba

November 4 - 6, 2010

After experiencing Rio, it was time to head south and get into Argentina as their summer was ramping up. Since I was going to be passing by Picinguaba, it would've been rude not to stop and say hello to my friends there and I hoped the weather would be nicer this time, as it was.


Heading south on BR-101 as it hugs the coast with views of islands and mountains blurring the distinction between land and sea.


Stopping for some lunch in the resort town of Angra dos Reis and noting what the locals think of their u-turn signs.


It's a beautiful drive along the Serra do Mar on a clear and sunny day.


Having a quick look at Paraty, a colonial town known for its charm and lined with cobblestones. If I didn't know about Picinguaba a bit further down, I would've probably stayed here longer.


The dramatic entrance to Picinguaba, passing by this shallow bay as the road winds down the mountains into the cove where the village sits.


A familiar sight, Carol's home for a few months in Picinguaba.


In the afternoon, I lounged about on the beach, writing and noting the life around. Fisherman here are preparing the nets for their early morning shift. Besides one hotel and a few shops, most everyone else's life revolves around fishing.


A souvenir shop on the beach.


A beautiful sunset from Picinguaba. Even though we're on the eastern coast of South America, the village sits on the south-western tip of a peninsula looking across a huge bay, providing nice views of sunsets.


The outdoor cafe where I spent the afternoon, taking inspiration from the waves and putting it into writing.


The waters calmed as the sun set.


And it quickly went dark as Sol went behind some dark clouds.


Peek-a-boo. The last rays glinting across the still waters before the sun disappeared behind low lying clouds.


The rays from the set sun reflecting off high clouds and lighting up a natural drain across the beach into the sea.


Carol was throwing a small party that night and in the ten days that I was in Rio, she befriended Carlos here, a next door fisherman and she got him to bring over some fresh fish and prepare it.


Carol has been enjoying her time in Picinguaba and was sad that her time here was coming to an end in a few weeks. She's preparing sushi rolls as...


...Carlos cuts up some fresh sashimi.


Fresh sushi and sashimi, straight from the sea.


Carlos was also preparing some soft-shell crabs.


And typical of Canadians, we had baked oatmeal cookies for dessert.


Dinner at Carol's with some of her friends from Quebec visiting with Vaigenio, his sister and Carlos.


After dinner and lots of wine, the dancing started (iPod speakers an essential item for impromptu dance parties). Here, Vaigenio and his sister, Maria are dancing the forbidden dance of Lambada in a Brazilian beach town. The moment was more special than just that as these siblings weren't on talking terms until this evening when they were separately invited for dinner. It's a small village and family politics can dictate life here. Their father had about 13 children from the same mother and some drifted apart while others grew close. Vaigenio said he didn't want to be seen in public with Maria but they decided to dance for us to show how it's done. I hope this evening thawed their complex relationship a bit.


I got up early the next morning and observed a fishing village come to life.


Older, traditional fishing boats, which were moored on shore were rolled down to the water on two logs.


Ravens abound waiting for discards from the fishing nets.


As some boats left, others were coming back in.


On the surface of it, life's a beach here. Kids playing football near the surf.


I spent the day with Carol and her friends and Maria lazing on the beach.


Maria going in for a dip in the Atlantic.


Besides snorkeling for a while, we relaxed and dwelled on the fact of enjoying some sun in southern Brazil.


I was in the middle of an interesting conversation where the Canadians were saying how these were the smallest swinsuits they would dare wear (recently bought in Ubatuba) and Maria, of course saying they should go smaller as she was in her bikini. I knew Brazil would be fun, but you never know how much until you get here.


As I was nearing the end of my time in Brazil, my Portuguese was finally coming strong and I was translating between Maria and the Canadians. It took about two months for my Spanish to flow easily and it was about the same time for Portuguese to start flowing, having superseded Spanish as the 'other' language in my brain. But now I was going to be entering Spanish-speaking Argentina and I hoped I could switch back easily.


Sunset across the Picinguaba bay, leaving me with a good taste for Brazilian beach life.


Saying bye to Talia in the morning. She was working extra hard during my second visit, so we didn't spend much time together but we shared a meal. She wants to do something for the community here, but without treading on their customs. As she has realized, we make global change by acting locally and I hope she succeeds.


It's the location and the people I knew there that drew me in for a second visit to Picinguaba and I left with a positive vibration. Life isn't all a beach and we wouldn't achieve the things we've done if everyone lived on a beach, but there's something special about seeing how simple and full-filling life can be.
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Old 03-17-2011, 09:23 AM   #852
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Brazil, Part 12: Iguazu Falls and Itaipu Dam

November 6 - 10, 2010

With my three month Brazilian visa coming to an end soon (and visa extensions not an easy matter for me), it was time to exit and there's a grand exit to be had by seeing the impressive Iguazu Falls and Itaipu Dam at a point where Paraguay, Argentina and Brazil meet.


Saying goodbye to the beach life as I head south on BR-101 and climb up the Serra do Mar back to São Paulo.


I passed through São Paulo on my way south and stayed with Fernando and Luciana again for a night. It was nice to see Buma.


I've noticed trucks like these all over South America, which I haven't seen further north. Where there are multiple axles, one of them can be lifted and disengaged from running on the road, increasing tire life and fuel mileage (as rolling resistance is reduced). I've seen them on trailers and the tractors. A good idea when running light. Also, almost all the trucks have the forced wheel speed limiters on them (the contraption on the wheel hub). Not sure how well it works, since most of the truckers drive quite fast, regardless.


A typical meal at a roadside restaurant on the tolled highways. For R$13 (US$7.50) you get a piece of fried beef, rice, beans and a salad. The yellow powder is farina/farofa, powdered tapioca flour, which adds a crunch to the meal.


Heading south on the three-lane wide tollway of BR-116 from São Paulo to Curitiba. The curves and elevation made for a fun ride and the R$4.50 in tolls makes quick work of the 475 kms.


There are some sharp turns as the route winds along the hilly coast and there were numerous signs warning drivers not to apply the brakes when in a turn, leading to a tipover but to scrub off speed before a turn. Good driving skills to know. And to become a racer, the next logical lesson is to accelerate through the turn feeling the maximum g-forces.


Meeting up with Reginaldo from Curitiba, outside the city at Portal da Graciosa. Reginaldo is part of the HorizonsUnlimited community of bike travelers and he's been a helpful source to numerous travelers passing through Curitiba. He contacted me through facebook through mutual overland traveler friends.


Riding the scenic route to Curitiba. Reginaldo's traveled around South America a few times and on different vehicles, so his knowledge is invaluable.


A fancy bus stop as we rode through the outskirts of the city heading to his house. Curitiba is known as a well-planned city, that too for incorporating ecological principles into its design. I thought I would see more of the city when I came back later to apply for a Senegal visa before heading to Africa, but plans changed.


What was more special about the stay with Reginaldo was that he's traveled all around South America on a 1996 DR650, 2 years older than mine, so sanDRina had some good company for the night. We poured over maps in the evening and he shared lots of good info on border crossings in Patagonia and where the sights were. He's a true asset to the overland motorcycling community. Stop by and say hi if you're passing through southern Brazil.


The next day, it was tollways again, cutting across the southern tip of Brail towards Iguazu. There weren't any other good options besides the tollway, so you just have to fork over the US $15 in tolls for the 530 km stretch to Cascavel, near Iguazu. The most expensive day of riding in South America, not forgetting the expensive petrol in Brazil at US $5.30/gal (R$2.50/lt).


Signboards on the freeway counting down the approach to a sharp curve, similar to brake boards on a race track. I guess there have been enough accidents of tipped over vehicles, probably truckers who didn't slow down, that prompted these signs all over the highways.


The great soybean fields of Brazil, feeding the animals of the world. A picture that could resemble Wisconsin or any other rolling farmland.


At a toll booth. They think they can make you feel good for paying so much somehow by putting the word "eco" in their tollway name, but where's the connection? And the crazy thing is that the price changed from one toll booth to the next.


I met up with Tulio (yellow t-shirt) in Cascavel through CouchSurfing. He's a lawyer with the government and we had a sushi dinner at a food court in a mall. It felt so removed from my previous sushi dinner in Picinguaba.


The next morning, as I neared Iguazu, I spotted this sign with distances to the capital cities of Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina and Chile (in Spanish, the decimal and comma are switched around).


As I neared the town of Foz do Iguacu, a thundering storm was brewing so I put off visiting the falls till tomorrow.


But there's another site of interest in town, the gargantuan Itaipu Dam.


It was the world's largest dam until the Three Gorges project was finished recently in China. But since that dam is still ramping up its electrical generation, Itaipu still stands as the largest source of hydroelectric energy in the world.


Built in the early 80s on the Parana River, it straddles the border between Paraguay and Brazil with both countries sharing the cost and benefits.
Click here to see the high resolution version


It produces 80% of Paraguay's electricity needs and about a quarter of Brazil's. This along with developing sugarcane ethanol has led Brazil to be largely fossil-fuel independent compared to many western nations and rightly or wrongly is seen as a model forward for many developing nations.


The large sluce pipes that direct the force of the water to the turbines that spin to generate supposedly 'free' electricity. The dam cost US$25 billion dollars and...


One fact that gets repeatedly ignored by proponents of hydroelectric energy is the change to the terrain that happens from the reservoirs that form behind these huge dams - their ecological footprints. While the benefits of 'clean energy' are touted as being worth it for the price local peoples and animals have to pay, there is change to regional climate and downstream environments that are ignored. They say this reservoir engulfed a waterfalls as impressive as the Iguazu falls. While hydro is considered a renewable energy, it comes with hidden costs that are not evident in the short term.


Do only humans have a say in how we shape this planet or do the little guys also matter?


That evening I stayed with Kacilla thru CS (center) and she's going to night school for a degree in tourism. I joined her to get some internet access and Bianca, on my left, of Japanese-Brazilian descent, wanted some help with her English lessons.


Getting some kebabs after classes ended.


There's a strong Lebanese influence in southern Brazil and it's evident in the numerous kebab eateries. As usual, Brazilians sprinkle farofa on everything.


Hoping for a clear day, I paid the hefty entrance fee (R$49, $28) to see the awesome Iguazu Falls. One of the natural wonders of the world.


The Parana River flows over an escarpment and gushes water over the edge.


The Brazilian side of the falls allows you to get real close to the bottom of a set of falls and fully appreciate the force of water thundering down. Even with the Itaipu Dam upstream, the force of the water is very impressive.


The falls straddle the border between Brazil and Argentina and there are different views from each side. Here, on the Brazilian side, there are walkways that allow you to feel the heavy spray and get engulfed by the sound of the falling water.


Looking downstream of the falls with Argentina on the left side. I think Niagara Falls has a higher flow rate per minute but Iguazu spreading out over a much wider mouth, resulting in about 275 distinct waterfalls, flows more water overall. And Victoria Falls in Zambia keeps the title of the longest curtain of water.


This panorama stitch isn't the best, but it gives an idea of the views from the Brazilian side looking across to Argentina.


Checking out from Brazil at the federal police office at the border.

My three month stay in Brazil came to an end with one day left in my visa. I had planned to stay for two months, but with how well things were going, it was easy to stay longer. I started in the remote regions of the Amazon and crossed the rainforest on the TransAmazonica Highway and slowly came down the coast towards ever greater development resulting in the megalopolis of São Paulo. Rio on the other hand showed how wonderful a huge city could be, blessed with fantastic geography. I found my slice of paradise in Picinguaba and in all the Brazilians that I came in touch with. There's an energy you feel that emanates from the people and I think I need to spend more time here to better understand it. Travel is expensive through Brazil (compared to neighboring countries) but with their beautiful smiles and sweet-sounding Portuguese, you'll be happy to pay whatever it costs to experience some of the good vibes of Brasil.
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Old 03-17-2011, 11:35 AM   #853
WilderRider
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Originally Posted by Jammin View Post
I made 3 videos and processed lots of photos on the ship. Will be posting it over the coming days. Here's the Lagunas video:

6 days across remote high-altitude southwestern Bolivia in a strange Mars-like landscape. The toughest riding I've done with lots of deep sand and rocks for 500 kms. Epic views and camping. Average altitude was around 4,000 m (13,000 ft), peaking at 5,000 m (16,400 ft).


Thanks for the video. That is beautiful stuff. That deep sand looked like it really would suck.
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Old 03-17-2011, 10:47 PM   #854
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Originally Posted by Jammin View Post
Hey Paul, yes, definitely do the Canon del Pato, fantastic ride. I went West to East from the Coast to Caraz. A few km north of Chimbote, there's a turn off from the town of Santa. It's paved till Chuquicara. Then don't cross the river on the bridge, but go straight and the off-road starts and just keep following it and you will roll into Caraz. Dont think it had a number. Ask the locals for the road with all the tunnels.
Here's a google map showing the off-road part of the route. It's longer, but gmap wont route the whole thing.
jay

found it, thanks

paul
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Old 03-18-2011, 02:18 AM   #855
Jammin OP
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Have a safe voyage Jay.
Will be looking forward to hearing from you around Ides of March.
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Sounds like a fun new part of the adventure. Can't wait for the Africa leg.
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Calm waters and following seas to you my friend. Thanks for taking us along.
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May you have fair winds and following seas. Can't wait for more. Looking forward to Africa.
Thanks for the well wishes. The ship journey was great. Calms seas until we got to Europe, then some swells in the ocean and lots of movement in the ship, but manageable. Getting closer to Africa...
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Enjoy the peace of the boat - hoping you have a calm journey.
Don't forget to exercise, that is, if you can fit it in the small bit of free time you'll have on the ship...
- Dan
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If they have table tennis a month will go by too fast.
Haha, yup. Played table tennis every day, was good to exercise a bit. But damn, I haven't had to stare at a computer screen for so long since leaving the US. My eyes were straining editing photos and videos. Hope you guys enjoy it.
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you are my hero!
Haha, thanks!
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