ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Bikes > Old's Cool > Airheads
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-05-2010, 08:59 AM   #46
x3300 OP
geoff
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: San Jose, CA
Oddometer: 170
Sensor Harness

I've started to focus on getting the electrical system in order, which will be a fair amount of work in all. I've already got the voltage regulator harness done as reported in a previous post. I'll also need to rebuild the main and sensor harnesses, which will include some mods to each. The rear harness is in good condition, and I think I can use it as is with maybe some changes to the terminals for a different tail lamp and turn signals. The dash electronics need to be designed and wire up, and an overhaul of the bean can which has a sticky advance is needed. I haven't decided on the tail lamp and turn signals, but I do know I'll try to use LED units for those.

I needed to wire in an engine temperature sensor for the Trail Tech computer I have in the dash. I figured the cleanest way was to have the sensor lead run under the left carb and hook into the existing GS sensor harness then go up through the main harness to come out up near the steering head.

I took some measurements of the GS sensor harness and came up with this harness design diagram. The connector I used for the temp sensor between the sensor harness and the main harness is a Molex .062 2-pin connector.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/19-sensor-harness/sensor-harness-diagram.jpg

Here is the stripped sensor harness, a Trail Tech temp sensor I'll use, and a Trail Tech V300-48 sensor extension cable. The extension cable isn't long enough to reach from under the carb to the steering head so I'll need to extend it with some wire in the main harness. For the sensor harness end I just cut it to the right length and soldered on Molex connector pins.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/19-sensor-harness/stripped.jpg

Here's the finished sensor harness with a new connector for the oil pressure switch.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/19-sensor-harness/done.jpg

I'll put the temp sensor under the rear left valve cover nut. I plan to hook up an oil temp sensor later.

-x3300
x3300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2010, 09:17 PM   #47
Mr. Vintage
Family Dude
 
Mr. Vintage's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: The Palouse
Oddometer: 828
Lookin' very good. Clever fork lock design too.
__________________
- Jeff (Mr. Vintage) -
Quota, SL350, MW250, MT250, CT90
Mr. Vintage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 10:58 AM   #48
x3300 OP
geoff
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: San Jose, CA
Oddometer: 170
Main Harness

The main wiring harness needed some modification to accommodate the Enduralast voltage regulator and other accessories I wanted. I made up this diagram to work from.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/mods-diagram.jpg

At the dash I wanted dedicated power and ground for auxiliary lights, grip heaters, etc., and to have those switched by a relay in series with the existing load shedding relay so that the accessories would also be shed when the starter motor was running.

I found the existing tach signal compatible with the trail tech computer so no harness mod was needed for that, but I did needed to run temperature sensor leads down to the sensor harness as I mentioned was needed in my previous post.

The parts bike didn't have a usable main harness, so I found one on ebay from a seller in Israel. Here's what arrived. It's generally in good shape, but much of the wrapping tape is falling apart.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/start.jpg

It seems after time the tape adhesive dries up and what's left is just glue dust and loose fabric. Where the fabric is really loose dirt and grit enter into the harness.

As I was cutting off the layers a lot of sand and dust was coming out and I imagined the previous owner hauling out in top gear across the vastness of the Israeli desert with a huge cloud of dust trailing behind.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/dust.jpg

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/stripped.jpg

I cleaned up the bare harness and all the connectors with compressed air and a tooth brush.

To start with the mods I put the harness in position and installed the various components it connected up with.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/installed.jpg

I choose to use 3M Scotch Super 33+ and Super 88 vinyl tape for the rebuild. The 33+ is a little thinner and good for binding and prep work. I used the thicker 88 for the final wrap layer.

I've used these tapes before for harness rebuilds and was satisfied with the result. The finished look is different than the original GS fabric tape, but I think it gives an acceptable look.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/tools.jpg

For spicing wires together I bought several sizes of brass tube from a local hobby shop. I cut a small piece off with a hacksaw and finish the ends with a file then crimp and solder the connection.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/connector-stock.jpg

Here's where I tapped into the existing green 'switched power' in the harness to add in the new voltage regulator power lead.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/regulator-power.jpg

And the finished connection between the main and engine wiring harnesses.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/regulator-connection.jpg

Here's what I was faced with in the front. A lot of existing stuff, and a lot of added stuff for the dash. It took a while to get everything sorted out.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/front-harness.jpg

I could get that thing under control though, and here's the finished harness laid out.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/done.jpg

With the harness wrap finished I installed it on the bike and started on hooking up all the connections. This shows how the voltage regulator and relays fit with my custom mounts and the rebuilt harness.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/relays.jpg

To get the things under the front cover in order I needed to take apart the bean can and figure out why the advance was sticking. I won't go into the details of that since its well reported elsewhere. I found some rust on the moving parts of the advance mechanism and figured that was the problem. I cleaned it up and put some high temp grease at the moving parts.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/bean-can.jpg

This shows how I ran the alternator output wires and how I attached the terminal block to the timing chain cover.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/alt-term-block.jpg

In the front there was a lot of extra wire since I no longer have the faring nor instruments. It took a while to get it routed and bundle so it wasn't too ugly. The headlight covers most of the bundles.

I'll do some more work up here later as I continue on the dash wiring.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/20-main-harness/front-done.jpg

-x3300
x3300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 12:14 PM   #49
rediRrakaD
Whoopdie do
 
rediRrakaD's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Location: Oaktown
Oddometer: 608
Thanks for sharing and inspiring. Nice build.
Cheers,
S.
__________________
RIFF RAFF
Industrial Tiki Purveyor
rediRrakaD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 04:28 PM   #50
Zebedee
Studly Adventurer
 
Zebedee's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2004
Location: ... I was born a ramblin' man
Oddometer: 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by rediRrakaD
Thanks for sharing and inspiring. Nice build.
Cheers,
S.
^^^ what he said ^^^

Don't ya just hate it when these folks make it look so easy ...



John
__________________
The perverse must persevere
Zebedee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 05:13 PM   #51
JMforPres
Gnarly Adventurer
 
JMforPres's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Location: Charlotte, NC
Oddometer: 217
Nice writeup!

JMforPres is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2010, 12:16 PM   #52
x3300 OP
geoff
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: San Jose, CA
Oddometer: 170
Dash Wiring

I've been working on the dash wiring and a lot of other miscellaneous things around the bike since my last report. I'm hoping to get the dash wiring done this weekend.

Here's what I've been dealing with.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/21-dash-wiring/wiring-dash.jpg

All custom stuff for the most part. I made up this diagram to work from. It doesn't yet include the instrument lights.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/21-dash-wiring/dash-diagram.jpg

On the dash I'll have switches for two independently switched auxiliary front lights, a switch for the headlight low beam, and a switch for the hazard flasher. I have a hazard capable flasher unit, but I still need to figure out what kind of switch it needs and how to wire it in. I'll also have a rotary pot for variable power grip heaters. I'll cover the design of these in another report.

To power the GPS unit I'll have a 5 volt source going to a USB Mini-B plug. This will plug directly into my GPS. I'll also have another 5 volt source going to a USB Series A receptacle to power auxiliary devices like a cell phone charger, a Walkman, or an NiMH battery charger.

Here's what I'm working on for the USB power, I'll have two separate LM7805 linear voltage regulators for the supply. I had some USB cables kicking around that I'll cut up and solder to the LM7805's output.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/21-dash-wiring/usb-regulators.jpg

Just for reference, a typical pinout for USB connectors:

Code:
pin 1	red	+5 volt
pin 2	white	data -
pin 3	green	data +
pin 4	black	gnd
I'll just leave the white and green data lines unconnected. The regulators I chose can source 2 amps each, but to do so for very long will need good heat sinks on them. I'll screw them down directly to the aluminum dash for that.

-x3300
x3300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2010, 04:27 PM   #53
NordieBoy
Armature speller
 
NordieBoy's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Location: Kiwiland
Oddometer: 6,999
Quote:
Originally Posted by x3300
Just for reference, a typical pinout for USB connectors:

Code:
pin 1	red	+5 volt
pin 2	white	data -
pin 3	green	data +
pin 4	black	gnd
I'll just leave the white and green data lines unconnected. The regulators I chose can source 2 amps each, but to do so for very long will need good heat sinks on them. I'll screw them down directly to the aluminum dash for that.

-x3300
Some gps's'ss's's need the data lines shorted or something so they don't go into mass storage mode.
NordieBoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2010, 04:37 PM   #54
Zebedee
Studly Adventurer
 
Zebedee's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2004
Location: ... I was born a ramblin' man
Oddometer: 735
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordieBoy

... gps's'ss's's ...
Bless you, Nordie.

[bless you, English/Kiwi = Gazuntite, 'merkin]



Oh, and keep up the good work X3300
__________________
The perverse must persevere
Zebedee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2010, 08:07 AM   #55
Mr. Vintage
Family Dude
 
Mr. Vintage's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2007
Location: The Palouse
Oddometer: 828
Quote:
Originally Posted by x3300
To power the GPS unit I'll have a 5 volt source going to a USB Mini-B plug. This will plug directly into my GPS. I'll also have another 5 volt source going to a USB Series A receptacle to power auxiliary devices like a cell phone charger, a Walkman, or an NiMH battery charger.
What is a walkman?

Lookin good....
__________________
- Jeff (Mr. Vintage) -
Quota, SL350, MW250, MT250, CT90
Mr. Vintage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2010, 11:09 AM   #56
x3300 OP
geoff
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: San Jose, CA
Oddometer: 170
Dash Done

NordieBoy, pin #4 of the USB Mini-B is normally not used. Some newer Garmin units use pin #4 to detect if the unit is connected to a computer or a charger. Chargers have pin #4 grounded, and computer cables have it open. My unit (Oregon) has an option (Spanner) to ask the user what to do on connection.

Here's the connector pinout:

Code:
USB Mini-B pinout

pin 1	red	+5 volt
pin 2	white	data -
pin 3	green	data +
pin 4	brown	n/c
pin 5	black	gnd
For now I'll use Spanner mode. I'd like to have a connector that has pin #4 grounded, but I haven't found anyway to do this other than by buying a Garmin charger and cutting off the connector.

I found these cables from Argent Data Systems that have a lead for pin #4, but unfortunately, the angle of the connector won't work with my Oregon.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/22-dash-done/usb-mini-b-ra.jpg

Here's how I soldered up the 5 volt regulators.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/22-dash-done/regulator-soldering.jpg

And the finished supplies ready for installation. I applied some heat sink compound and screwed the heat sinks down to the underside of the front dash mount bracket.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/22-dash-done/regulators.jpg

I decided to try using the individual LEDs for the dash instrument lights. I soldered on 1K ohm resistors to each LED and used heat shrink tube on all the connections to insulate and strengthen.

All I have to show the construction is this blurry photo.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/22-dash-done/led-resistors.jpg

And here are the finished dash lights. I used the OE light harness and cut off the existing bulbs then soldered on my LEDs. The photo also shows my notes on polarity and wire color of the different lights.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/22-dash-done/dash-leds.jpg

Here's the dash powered up. I pressed the LEDs into their clip holders from the back with a few drops of 'super glue' to keep them from popping out.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/22-dash-done/dash-done.jpg

It seems the 1K resistors will give a good brightness. I'm thinking a night dimmer would be nice to have, but I'll wait until I get some real use before deciding to make something.

I found the dash as designed really too tight underneath. It was hard to install and wire up the components. It would be nice to have some more space below the top panel to ease maintenance.

-x3300
x3300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2010, 11:17 AM   #57
nella
Gnarly Adventurer
 
nella's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Location: Raleigh, NC
Oddometer: 405
Thumb

The dash looks great!
__________________
Scott
nella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2010, 07:34 AM   #58
x3300 OP
geoff
 
Joined: Mar 2005
Location: San Jose, CA
Oddometer: 170
Trans Work

I noticed that the output shaft of the trans was a bit tight to turn, and I had intended to go through it, so decided it was as good a time as any to take the trans apart put some new parts in. I won't go into much detail of how to do a rebuild since it has been well reported elsewhere.

I have this flange puller from Ed Korn's Cycleworks. I don't think it would be to hard to make something though.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/flange-puller.jpg

Here's a side view of the puller.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/puller-detail.jpg

With the flange off I used some heat and a plastic mallet to get the cover off and pull out the parts.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/parts-out.jpg

The new parts; 5 shaft bearings, some seals, a neutral switch, the critical shifter spring, a 1st gear bushing, and a 688 bearing. The front input bearing was OK, so I decided to not replace it. I also put in a new cover gasket.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/trans-parts.jpg

I took the shift mechanism apart to replace the critical spring. I put a witness line on the cams with a Sharpie marker.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/shifter-apart.jpg

I also replaced the plastic detent roller with a 688 roller bearing as seen here. 688s are used for in-line skate wheels, so easy to find.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/shifter-roller.jpg

I used this puller to get the bearings off.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/pulling-bearing.jpg

Here's the output shaft disassembled. I took it down this far to machine a groove to accept a circlip that will hold the front bearing on, a standard mod for these transmissions.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/output-shaft.jpg

The circlip is an external 17x1. The DIN 471 spec gives a groove diameter of 16.2 mm, so I only needed to remove 0.8 mm off the shaft diameter.

Here's how I mounted the output shaft on a lathe to turn the groove. I ground the width of a standard carbide cutting tool down to about 1.5 mm, then made the cut with the right edge of the tool 18 mm from the bearing shoulder (17 for the bearing, and 1 for the circlip). The shaft was pretty hard, but I went slow and could make the cut with the carbide tool. I've heard of using a grinding attachment to grind the groove.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/cutting-groove.jpg

To make up a plate for shimming the bearings I mounted the trans cover on a mill and used the mill's DRO and an edge finder to get the relevant cover dimensions.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/cover-measure.jpg

Here are the measurements I came up with.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/cover-dimentions.jpg

And the resulting shim plate drawing to work with.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/plate-drawing.jpg

Here's the plate bolted to the assembled trans ready for shimming.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/shim-plate.jpg

The bearing end clearance of each of the three shafts needs to be set using shims. The proper shim thickness is determined by measuring the depth of the cover hole that accepts the bearing, the thickness of the plate, the thickness of the cover gasket, and the height of the bearing above the plate.

Code:
  gap = cover + gasket - plate - bearing
http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/shimming.jpg

Anyway, I could get it all shimmed up and reassembled without much worth reporting.

http://stuff.gotdns.org/bike/orgs-build-up/23-trans-rebuild/trans-done.jpg

-x3300

x3300 screwed with this post 08-21-2010 at 07:46 AM Reason: Fix spelling
x3300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2010, 08:17 AM   #59
bgoodsoil
Dare to be Stupid
 
bgoodsoil's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA
Oddometer: 3,998
Seriously man, what do you do for a living? This isn't the work of some n00b like me.
__________________
'85 BMW r80G/S--Another G/S on the road--Central America on a Shoestring--Nova Scotia on a Shoestring--Never Leave a Man's Behind

Proud SmugMug User Support ADV: Don't give those cheap bums your discount code
bgoodsoil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2010, 04:04 PM   #60
maverick
Lost South-African..
 
maverick's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2002
Location: Essex, UK
Oddometer: 561
Nice work dude, following with interest. You are certainly very talented
__________________
Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
maverick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014