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Old 03-17-2010, 01:55 PM   #61
craftycoder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markbvt
People air down offroad-oriented tires (which typically have stiffer sidewalls), and if it's a big bike, they usually only go down to 22psi or so.
Stiffer sidewalls is certainly an aspect of offroad tires. I don't think you can count on them to protect your rims from under inflation though. Bikes (big ones even more so) require "appropriate" inflation for the circumstances. This is a moving target based on your suspension, tires, road conditions, gross vehicle weight, and all the other things I'm not thinking of right now.

I've never bottomed out my suspension, but I'm a little guy who likes to keep both tires connected to the ground and I try to ride in such a way that the front end is light when I hit obstacles and heavy when I'm in turns. If there is an obstacle in a turn, I slow down. Not terribly complicated.

I suggest Mitas E09 tires. The carcass of the tire is STIFF. My hands are still sore.
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Old 03-17-2010, 02:23 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by Dirsuper
Bigger pics! This picasa thing is cool!



















Now we're talking.
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Old 03-17-2010, 03:06 PM   #63
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Cool! Thanks.
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Old 03-17-2010, 03:13 PM   #64
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Looking at the pictures, the narrow and sharp angle of the bend on the wheel (front wheel), and the corresponding narrow impact marking on the tires (front and back wheels), I would say your tires were very under-inflated. No rim would survive that type of impact when the tire does not provide any cushion.
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Old 03-17-2010, 03:22 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by Lion BR
and the corresponding narrow impact marking on the tires (front and back wheels)
I don't see the "narrow impact marking", can you highlight it for us?
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Old 03-17-2010, 03:42 PM   #66
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It sucks that your wheel is bent, and especially that you said you weren't riding the bike hard. When I first read this after you first posted it, I wondered if your tires were under inflated. Your pics above show clearly that they were under inflated hence the damage. Even the rims supplied by Woody's will bend if the appropriate tire pressure isn't observed.

You could blame the dealer, but ultimately, it's your mistake for not checking your tire pressure prior to your ride. Sucks big time, especially that the bike is brand new..

Before you spend a lot of money on new wheels from Woody's, I'd get him to fix the stock ones and keep an eye on tire pressure. If you ride hard on dirt, then consider upgrading them at that time. Woody knows wheels and he'll get yours fixed up properly.

p.s. One time I picked up my bike from dealer service and my tires were inflated to 50 psi! I called them, they looked into it and sure enough their gauge was defective.
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Old 03-17-2010, 04:40 PM   #67
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Originally Posted by HWSNBN
Behr and who else?
Mine have "DID" etched into them.
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Old 03-17-2010, 04:51 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by YetiGS
Ooof. That blows. Keep working on BMW and the dealership.


I wonder if it has anything to do with the tires? i.e. street-oriented tires like those would have, I would imagine, softer sidewalls. Not offering an excuse for BMW, just wondering if that contributed.
Nope,...I was running Mitas E09 Dakars with Over 30psi pressure and they still bent. I never aired down before and now I run even higher pressure like 36 front/38 rear. It bounces around a little more but oh well..

I used my adjustable wrench to interum fix mine. Works so far...

[/quote]

Mine came from the dealer looking like this with the tube pinched in the wheel...

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Old 03-17-2010, 04:51 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by Dirsuper
Thanks bro, that only adds more fuel to the fire....clearly whoever they sourced my rims from produced a faulty product......and will continue to do so if this issue is denied.
You think you're steamed... my old man just shat the diesel injectors in his Nissan truck. Nissan say "bad fuel, no warranty". Shell say "prove it". Up for $6000 for new injectors, pumps and labour.

Basically, I'm sorry you're having a bad experience with your 800GS, but it is a good bike. The reason there's so much lively discussion on this forum about "what bike" is because there just isn't a perfect, tough, light, agile, fuel efficient, long-range, sweet-handling pack mule out there. Every ADV bike has a compromise.

A lot of people buying into the 800GS seem to be buying their first dirt tourer - either upgrading from an enduro, or making their first foray into the ADV world. These people have grossly unrealistic expectations as to what to expect - the 800GS is a travel bike, designed for touring Australia or riding to Africa.

The glossy PR pics of some bloke leaping around an MX track on it don't make it a dirt bike, any more than Harley's choice of the Phillip Island MotoGP circuit to launch the new Rocker C in Australia makes that a track bike.

Out of interest, if you'd hit a patch of loose sand, got into a tank-slapper, and high-sided it, would you be blaming BMW for the resulting damage?
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Old 03-17-2010, 06:13 PM   #70
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According to my trusty (I assume, I have three and they were all the same +/- 1.5 degrees) tire pressure gauge, the front is right between 35-36 and the rear is at 38. The manual recommends: Front 31.9, one-up at 68 degrees. 36.3 two-up or load. Rear, 36.3 one up at 68 degrees. 42.1 two-up or load. It is 73 degrees here, and I am at 1470 ft. above sea level. I weigh ~200 pounds.

Would I blame BMW for damage caused by me wrecking the bike? Come on bro, I don't see the relationship.

Whatever, my main goal was to see if anyone else had experienced this issue and was successful in getting it taken care of by the manufacturer. Obviously not. Lesson learned. Lesson to be passed on to others.

The suggestion to just get these repaired and.....I guess, avoid going off road is appreciated, but if that were the case I would have bought a different bike. I do believe that Woody's is the answer.

I do appreciate everyone inspiring me to check the pressure on every tire I own.....I just need to hit the wheelbarrow and the kid's bike and I am good to go!
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Old 03-17-2010, 06:33 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raider
You think you're steamed... my old man just shat the diesel injectors in his Nissan truck. Nissan say "bad fuel, no warranty". Shell say "prove it". Up for $6000 for new injectors, pumps and labour.

Basically, I'm sorry you're having a bad experience with your 800GS, but it is a good bike. The reason there's so much lively discussion on this forum about "what bike" is because there just isn't a perfect, tough, light, agile, fuel efficient, long-range, sweet-handling pack mule out there. Every ADV bike has a compromise.

A lot of people buying into the 800GS seem to be buying their first dirt tourer - either upgrading from an enduro, or making their first foray into the ADV world. These people have grossly unrealistic expectations as to what to expect - the 800GS is a travel bike, designed for touring Australia or riding to Africa.
The glossy PR pics of some bloke leaping around an MX track on it don't make it a dirt bike, any more than Harley's choice of the Phillip Island MotoGP circuit to launch the new Rocker C in Australia makes that a track bike.
Out of interest, if you'd hit a patch of loose sand, got into a tank-slapper, and high-sided it, would you be blaming BMW for the resulting damage?

Some sense at last.
I Picassoed the original front rim in about 4 places.
At great expense to the managment I then replaced this with a 2.05" (or whatever the original is) Sun rim from Buchanans, drilled and laced up by Lightfoot Engineering in Melbourne.
First ride on this new rim I hit a washout at an angle and bent this rim as well!
There was no way I was spending another $600 so I took the tyre off and belted the rim back in shape with a FBH and a lump of wood.
My call on it all -
It's not BMW's fault that I bend rims
The rims are not substandard, thry're too wide for off road use, my next front will be a 1.85", rear 18''x3.5 or so.
The front suspension is too soft, it bottoms out and then something has to give, Wrap a cable tie around the staunchion, or just look at the wiped off dust, the suspension is bottomed out when 20mm or so of the staunchion is still sticking out of the slider.
I am only 75kg 59yrs old, and no Crusty Demon, but I still bottomed out that front end, heaps.
FWIW I replaced the stock front end with the Bitubo kit and in my opinion it is too hard.
Still pondering my next move.
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Old 03-17-2010, 06:38 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raider
Mine have "DID" etched into them.

Daido is the good stuff usually. I thought they were sourcing Behr's famous butter soft rims as they have for years...

The alloy Behr uses is complete shit, some 5000 series stuff I'd guess... a step above patio furniture. DID is usually 6000 or 7000 stuff from what I've seen. In fact I'd rate DID among the best rims I've ever laced up and ran through the evilest rocks. I've bent Excels but not yet a DID. I'm running a narrow set on my 950 KTM after benting the stock Behrs into squares and the things are proving super tough.

So I think the issues ya'll are having with these things probably is really similar to the problem we have in Orange Crush. Its a WIDE rim speced to work with a low profile street tire. Street tires are made to flex little in curves hence a short sidewall. Since the sidewalls short, they need wide rims. Dirt rims are narrow so they can withstand impacts. Less cantilever from the spokes means a stronger rim. Dirt tires are made with a much taller sidewall and bowed inward to flex and protect the rim. So they're two totally different concepts. Compromise DS rims are pretty much street rims made in larger diameters and DS tires tend to be street tires with a more open tread. Even TKCs are low profile rounded over tread street tires at their core, only with knobs. What we have here is a wheelset thats 50/50. 50% as good on the street as street wheels and 50% as good as dirt rims on dirt.

I replaced my rims with 1.85-21 front and a 2.5-18 on the rear of my ADV and haven't looked back. Nowhere near as good a bike now for riding twisties but wtf, I don't care. Way more solid in dirt and it has also opened up a world of cheap tires that'll fit. Hard riding as the OP is obviously doing, this is the way he's gonna have to go riding the way he's going imho.

Your only an hours ride from Buchanan's in Azusa. I'd take it there and have'em swap those rims out for a set of narrow Excels or DIDs iffin it were me.

HWSNBN screwed with this post 03-18-2010 at 05:39 AM
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Old 03-17-2010, 08:12 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HWSNBN
Daido is the good stuff usually. I thought they were sourcing Behr's famous butter soft rims as they have for years...

The alloy Behr uses is complete shit, some 5000 series stuff I'd guess... a step above patio furniture. DID is usually 6000 or 7000 stuff from what I've seen. In fact I'd rate DID among the best rims I've ever laced up and ran through the evilest rocks. I've bent Excels but not yet a DID. I'm running a narrow set on my 950 KTM after benting the stock Behrs into squares and the things are proving super tough.

So I think the issues ya'll are having with these things probably is really similar to the problem we have in Orange Crush. Its a WIDE rim speced to work with a low profile street tire. Street tires are made to flex little in curves hence a short sidewall. Since the sidewalls short, they need wide rims. Dirt rims are narrow so they can withstand impacts. Less cantilever from the spokes means a stronger rim. Dirt tires are made with a much taller sidewall and bowed inward to flex and protect the rim. So they're two totally different concepts. Compromise DS rims are pretty much street rims made in larger diameters and DS tires tend to be street tires with a more open tread. Even TKCs are low profile rounded over tread street tires at their core, only with knobs. What we have here is a wheelset thats 50/50. 50% as good on the street as street wheels and 50% as good as dirt rims on dirt.

I replaced my rims with 1.85-21 front and a 2.5-18 on the rear of my ADV and haven't looked back. Nowhere near as good a bike now for riding twisties but wtf, I don't care. Way more solid in dirt and it has also opened up a world of cheap tires that'll fit. Hard riding as the OP is obviously doing, this is the way he's gonna have to go riding the way he's going imho.
I make no representation about what most bikes come with, just what I've got. Mine also came with Anakees and a CZ chain, whereas all the other bikes from the same batch my dealer ordered had Battlewings and RK chains. Maybe it's an ex-press bike with the odo re-wound, maybe the unloved runt of a previous litter.
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Old 03-17-2010, 08:13 PM   #74
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This fall, the legendary GS gets even more legendary with the incredible new F 800 GS. It's lean. It's mean. It's ready to tackle everything from dual sport rides in the woods or desert to long-haul adventure touring. With a lightweight design and eye-opening power, The F 800 GS is the most off-road oriented GS ever built. A parallel twin engine with 85 charging horses and 62 lb/feet of torque give it startling speed and breathtaking acceleration. Throw in a dry weight of just 392 lbs, six-speed gear box, switchable ABS, wide foot rests and a 4.2 gallon tank located under the seat for a low center of gravity, and you get a enduro light enough for amazing handling no matter where you're headed. If you want all the capabilities of the GS in a lighter, tighter, totally aggressive package, the destined-to-be-a-classic F 800 GS is your ride.
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Old 03-17-2010, 10:58 PM   #75
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There she is, ready for wheels to get shipped off to Woody's......damn am I pissed!! Ruined a planned trip to San Francisco this weekend!!





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