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Old 02-25-2013, 09:18 PM   #1336
URAL CT
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Nice.../2s

I have a 1968 R60 US...owned it since new. I'm looking for a decent side stand that will not bend when I kick start with the side stand deployed. The after market side stand I bought is a POS. Lost the stock stand I modified after giving it to a friend to be upgraded...friend passed away while I was overseas on business. Family sold all his tools & other stuffs.
I use to set it on the center stand and everything is peachy. I'm getting too old now to be lifting the bike onto it's center stand it's becoming to be a chore. Any suggestion would be appreciate. I've seen some good one on this threat but dunno if they'll hold up to the task.
Cheers,
Charlie T
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Old 02-26-2013, 04:48 AM   #1337
bill42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by URAL CT View Post
I have a 1968 R60 US...owned it since new. I'm looking for a decent side stand that will not bend when I kick start with the side stand deployed. The after market side stand I bought is a POS. Lost the stock stand I modified after giving it to a friend to be upgraded...friend passed away while I was overseas on business. Family sold all his tools & other stuffs.
I use to set it on the center stand and everything is peachy. I'm getting too old now to be lifting the bike onto it's center stand it's becoming to be a chore. Any suggestion would be appreciate. I've seen some good one on this threat but dunno if they'll hold up to the task.
Cheers,
Charlie T
Charlie, as a newer owner of a /2, I've been scolded by the wise men like YOU, when I once tried to start mine in the side stand. When you do that you are stressing the frame of the bike and the side stand shaft. If you can't deploy the center stand (which doesn't really require any lifting if you set up your passenger peg correctly- just a bend of your leg as you roll the bike backwards), then at least take the pressure off the side stand when you step on the kick start arm. I personally would be more worried about knocking my bike over when trying to start while tilted. If that happens one day you could hurt yourself and hurt your back when you have to pick the bike up too. But again, I want to point out that putting a slash2 up on the center stand for me requires less effort and strength then starting the bike. Are you not planting your leg at just the right angle and using it as a lever?
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Old 02-26-2013, 05:23 AM   #1338
URAL CT
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/2

Thanks for the input bill42... My issue is that I'm not just advanced in age (old) , I'm also short (5'5"). To kick start the bike when it's on the center stand (my preferred method), I stand on the passenger peg with my right foot & give a swift kick to the lever downwards with my left foot I find it easy that way. When I kick start the bike while on its side stand, I stand along side the bike and kick start it with my left foot too. You are correct, I'd be putting undue stress to the motor mounting system of the bike with my current after market side stand. But with the stock side stand I had...the stress is placed on the side stand mounting bracket welded to the frame of the bike. It seemed to work well till I lost the side stand unit. Well...I suppose I need to practice on a better method of lifting the bike onto the center stand & taking it down. This is mainly where the problem is cuz I have to hold on & not drop the bike.
CT
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Old 02-26-2013, 06:20 AM   #1339
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/2 conversion pricecheck

Looking to get an idea on the price for this - this would be my first /2 and i'm not quite sure where the market is these days. From the ad:

"58 BMW R50/2 CONVERSION BIKE NOW HAS R75/5 MOTOR IT IS KICK AND ELECTRIC START. BIKE RUNS AND DRIVES GREAT.
ENGINE HAS DEEP OIL PAN, NEW TIRES, LARGE BMW TANK. I BELLIEVE PAINT IS ORGINAL .
BIKE IS DAILY DRIVER NOT SHOW QUEEN. HAS FLAW AND CHIPS IN PAINT. STAINLESS MUFFLERS, DENFIELD SOLO SEAT.
WAS A SIDECAR BIKE BUT I PURCHASED WITHOUT CAR. SADDLE BAGS ARE PIN STRIPED TO MATCH BIKE.
FRONT RIM IS CHROME. BACK RIM IS ALLOY.

FLAWS NO HORN, HEADLIGHT ONLY WORKS ON LOW"

Asking price is $9500.... too high, just right?
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Old 02-26-2013, 06:58 AM   #1340
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There's no way to be gentle about this...
That conversion might be worth 1/2 of the asking price. Mismatched everything. Wouldn't be able to get it inspected in my state.
Run away!!!
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Old 02-26-2013, 07:57 AM   #1341
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I agree. That is the worst first slash 2 bike you could buy as it is really a custom hodgepodge that you won't be able to fix of have serviced unless you built it yourself. You can get a really decent stock r50 or r60 for that price.
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Old 02-26-2013, 08:30 AM   #1342
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A bit of background, I suppose....

Not worried about originality or serial numbers. Looking for my next bike. Not only my only bike, but my only vehicle. 70 miles a week going to work and back, and whatever else I feel like doing. I've done it before with older bikes, so I'm not worried about getting the wrenches out. (point of reference, an older Vespa was my only vehicle for 2+ years. Doing a teardown every 6 months wasn't too out of the question). However, I often ride up/down 95 to and from Philly/NYC, etc. Everything I see online says the R60 is best at about 60/65 motorwise. I'd like that to be closer to 75. If a stock R60 could do it, i'd be fine. It sounds like I'll be needing the extra grunt of a /5 motor to do it, though.
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Old 02-26-2013, 09:03 AM   #1343
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonysmallframe View Post
A bit of background, I suppose....

Not worried about originality or serial numbers. Looking for my next bike. Not only my only bike, but my only vehicle. 70 miles a week going to work and back, and whatever else I feel like doing. I've done it before with older bikes, so I'm not worried about getting the wrenches out. (point of reference, an older Vespa was my only vehicle for 2+ years. Doing a teardown every 6 months wasn't too out of the question). However, I often ride up/down 95 to and from Philly/NYC, etc. Everything I see online says the R60 is best at about 60/65 motorwise. I'd like that to be closer to 75. If a stock R60 could do it, i'd be fine. It sounds like I'll be needing the extra grunt of a /5 motor to do it, though.

I too do not care about matching serial numbers or even keeping a slash2 all original. When I said you can get a stock R60 for that price, what I meant really was that you can get one that is a working, safe bike, and not a possible death trap. That chassis was designed in 1950 or so for a light weight motor that puts out half the power that an R75 motor can put out. Are the brakes upgraded to disk? That is common for these conversion bikes. Shocks and springs need to be beefed up too. Now you are putting all this extra stress that might crack the frame in many spots. I personally would be scared to ride this machine since I didn't build it myself and at this point you are putting your life in his hands. This is no longer a bike designed by BMW engineers. I would think of it like buying a Mazda Miata with a big blockV8 sticking out of the hood. Sure, it will go like stink in a straight line, but the car will not be a balanced sports car anymore, and when something breaks you won't have a manual to resort to to look up part numbers. In the case of the conversion bike, it might not steer well or handle as good as a balanced original R60.

My R50 goes 75 on the highway, but when I do go that fast it is close to redline and I feel like I am going 165 on a sport bike. An R60 has a bit more power but you are correct that the happy cruising speed of these bikes is 60 or 65. An R69S can reach 100 so maybe you should save a little more and get one of those, but they have the same brakes as my R50 and you are just not going to be as safe riding a lot of highway miles on a bike from the 50s if you want to cruise at 75. The forks wobble and the seat shakes over bumps. Hitting a pothole around a curve is an experience that you don't want to repeat on one of these bikes, in my opinion. But that doesn't mean you can't get one. My father rode my R50 for 60,000 miles all over the country with mu mom on back. These bikes can travel long distances. But going fast is just more risky. Would you want to have a '57 chevy as your daily driver? Because that is the same idea- 50's technology, and all the parts are now very old. You never know when something will break due to living 20 or 30 years past its original life expectancy.
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Old 02-26-2013, 09:46 AM   #1344
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Tony,
Some things to look for (and remember) when contemplating buying a /2.
Mileage. Despite some claims out there, these bikes do not last forever. Somewhere between 40 and 50,000 miles the seals and bearings in the transmission, engine and rear drive are worn. Do not trust the odometer. They are easily disconnected. At the same mileage, the motor must be stripped and the "slingers" must be cleaned. The slingers are two cupped discs on the crankshaft that act as the only oil filters on the bike. The oil gets "slung" to the outside of the disc and the dirt and sediment gets lodged out there. They actually do work, and after 40K they get full of muck. The muck then shuts off the oil supply to the rest of the motor...you can guess the rest.
That /5 motor you were looking at HAS a real oil filter. The /2's do not.
Matching numbers. BMW's all have serial numbers since day one. Matching numbers on the frame and the motor add greatly to the value of the bike. Mismatched numbers means somebody probably didn't clean the slingers and had to substitute a different motor. Stuffing a /5 motor into a /2 frame is known as a conversion. It might work quite well, but it's just not worth a whole lot as a "collectible" bike.
Condition A bike thats all beat up and rusty probably isn't going to run very well. That's because it wasn't well cared for all those years. Getting a /2 to run well and reliably for another 40K miles is probably going to cost 4 - 5000$.
Getting it to look pretty can cost just as much. There goes your $9500.
The parts and labor for these bikes are expensive. The only trade off is you will PROBABLY get your investment back.
Performance /2's were designed for a world different than the one we live in. The Interstate Highway System did not exist. People rode motorcycles because they were an economical alternative to a car. My R60/2 develops a mighty 29 HP! It can just about hold it's own on "the slab", but is at a terrible disadvantage when jockeying with 18 wheelers. In bumper to bumper it's downright dangerous as it really has very little stopping power. One learns a WHOLE different technique for safe riding. You don't ride at night as the lighting system does not allow you to be seen by other drivers. You on the other hand, will be lucky to see 100' in front. That's not a lot of lead time for an emergency stop that ain't gonna happen anyway.
Documentation Deciding to buy a bike based on the sellers description just doesn't cut it. One has to see and feel and hear and taste the machine, to make an educated decision. I have kept every receipt, for all parts and service ever performed on my bike. I have taken thousands of photo's detailing the process of bringing this bike back to life, much of the work I did myself. I started this thread for that reason. I entered the bike in AMCA Judging last year to get an independent appraisal from them, on the condition of the bike, as THEY saw it. My opinion doesn't mean squat, when I tell you that I think the bike is worth XXX amount of $... When I can tell you that the Judges thought the bike scored 96-1/4 points out of a possible 100...that documents the value of the bike better than Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds.

Keeping looking. You'll find a better deal than that maybe sooner, maybe later. Finding, restoring and running a /2 is a major exercise in patience...

I found this on the IBMWR marketplace last year. $5500. I bought it.
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danedg screwed with this post 02-26-2013 at 09:53 AM
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Old 02-26-2013, 10:04 AM   #1345
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As an owner of two R60's with one having a telescopic fork and the other an Earles fork, you have a unique perspective. How do your two R60's compare? WHich one do you prefer for certain types of riding?
I have only seen the US forks on R69S models, and usually they are from 1969. Yours must be very rare.

/bill
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Old 02-26-2013, 11:01 AM   #1346
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Lulubel

That's Lulubel,


1968 R60US. 25,000 miles. She was put up for sale by a guy near Syracuse, who'd owned her for 18 years. He was a "Process Engineer" for the local Budweiser plant. He only rode it for a couple hours every other Saturday during the season to the local Dairy Queen for root beer floats.
Retirement came along and he was selling the whole ranch and moving to Florida! He told me as much as he liked the bike he knew that it wasn't going to be able to take the heat and humidity of FLA, and he wasn't going to be able to keep up with traffic on 95 and The Beeline. He decided to let the US go and he was keeping the VStrom as a rider.
It started on the first kick.
I handed him the check.

She needed to have the fork oil changed and new tires to be a rider. I discovered damaged exhaust flange threads on one cylinder and had that repaired. I rebuilt the carbs. That's it.
The bike feels much "quicker" than the /2. About the same amount of power, but it's not hauling around the Earls Forks. I haven't actually weighed it but I assume it's a few pounds lighter. The "euro" style handlebars are lower than the "US" style handlebars on the /2. I much prefer a more "heads up" position.
The telescopic front end makes a huge handling improvement. The brakes are much better than the /2. It was the precursor to the /5 series that followed. Sort of....
It's a fun bike to ride around The Catskills.

But for everyday riding.. I'll jump on the /2 everyday. Super comfortable even 2 up. Very reliable. Rides like a Caddilac with those Earls Forks. When you do employ the "gentle retardation devices", the front end lifts up, it doesn't "dive".
Jezebel just feels "solid". It was the first bike I'd ever owned, the only bike I owned, and I learned to ride on her. Took my test on her. Then rode her for another 35,000 miles. ( Yeah I know...time to start thinking about the slingers again)
But, I got lucky. My first exposure to motorcycling was on a /2. The folks at the Dealer don't ask me if I'm interested in taking a test ride on an F800 or HPN2. Maybe it's the grin on my face when I walk in...They just shake their heads and say, "is that thing still running?".
I look at the modern bikes and just shake my head. "Yup!"

With the US, at 25,000 miles showing, I'm going to violate my own rule on owning a motorcycle and I'm going to hide her, not ride her. She's been placed in deep storage for another 5 years.
That's the plan. The value of the /2 rose dramatically since I got it 5 years ago. I don't know if that rate will be sustained for another 5 years given the destruction of the US economy by those nincompoops in Washington...I digress.


I'm looking for a nice ROI on the bike. But only if she stays pristine.
Jezebel is now showing 79,000 miles on the clock...
I'm not sure what I'd ask for her when the time comes. I'll be too old to jump on that rear peg and kick the starter in a wet boot..
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Old 02-26-2013, 11:40 AM   #1347
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Thanks for the entertaining story of your bikes. I haven't yet ridden a slash2 without an earles fork. I too learned on my R50, and it is my only working bike right now although I do have an R100RT in pieces that was purchased to be my first and maybe last cafe racer. The serious brake dive on that R100 is unsettling to someone used to an Earles fork! So I guess I am glad I have the earles fork on the R50. I am curious about your better brakes on your US model. The front wheel seems to be the same wheel as the regular earles fork slash 2. Is it really a different drum? I understand that the metals used in our drum brakes differ widely. Could it be that your US wheel simply has a drum made with better metal by chance? I think I got lucky with my drums as my R50 stops great. I can stop about as fast as an economy car I think.
By the way, just by switching to the euro bars and solo seat, my R50 feels much faster- because of the more sporting seating position. Perhaps that adds to your feeling that your R60US is much quicker.

It makes sense that you should store the low-miles rare R60US. Owning two similar bikes with the same motor, you aren't gaining much by keeping both on the road. I am not sure how much slash2's will go up in value but yours is one of the most rare slash 2's anywhere, so yours will go up more than others.
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Old 02-26-2013, 12:28 PM   #1348
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One of my favorite shots of a Slash 2..... and yes, it is a conversion (look at that oil pan!)

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Old 02-26-2013, 12:38 PM   #1349
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One of my favorite shots of a Slash 2..... and yes, it is a conversion (look at that oil pan!)

Now that IS an awesome shot! Dude has style!
Now, what corkscrew is this guy riding on? Laguna Seca? Impressive that he is right be hind a much newer sport bike.
Do you happen to know who owns this photo? I would love to run it in the club magazine I work for.
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Old 02-26-2013, 01:02 PM   #1350
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Speaking of conversion Slash 2's

While we are on the topic of conversion Slash2 bikes, IMOP if you are going to build a conversion, you might as well go all the way!
Here is a photo of my R50 posing next to another show off...

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