ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-06-2014, 12:52 PM   #1546
Noone
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Sitting at a Cross Roads lookin' for a sign
Oddometer: 1,324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siper2 View Post
-
- Learn how to do slow-speed U-turns (I still suck, but am improving).

-).
Have you watched Ride Like A Pro DVDs? They are pretty informative.
Noone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2014, 08:04 PM   #1547
steve68steve
Studly Adventurer
 
steve68steve's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
Oddometer: 510
This thread compelled me to look up "trail braking." Enjoy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trail_braking
__________________
Steve

'12 Glee
steve68steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2014, 12:03 PM   #1548
Paebr332
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Apr 2012
Location: Shippensburg, PA
Oddometer: 849
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve68steve View Post
My MSF class taught us to "NEVER use brakes when leaned over at speed. If a corner tightens up or you're going too fast, lean more."

I took away that braking in a turn = "automatic crash" instead of somewhere between "no big deal" and "saved my bacon."

Seriously - noob me probably would've slammed into an obstacle rather than brake. WTF they teach that, I have no idea.
For beginners not using the brakes while leaned over is good advice. We are talking about riders who can barely control the bike at low speed in most cases. Trying to get them to understand trail braking and to execute it correctly is asking WAY to much of new riders.
Paebr332 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2014, 02:46 PM   #1549
BikeMikeAZ
n00b
 
Joined: Jan 2014
Location: Tucson
Oddometer: 8
This 'lean vs brake' topic comes up a lot. Here's one way to think about it:
Tires only have a certain amount of traction for any given set of conditions. It can all be used for braking, or for cornering, or for some combination of the two.
If 100% of traction is being used for the current lean angle in a corner, the bike will have to be straightened up and slowed before being able to turn sharper.
MSF teaches to straighten up then brake, because new riders haven't learned to judge 'traction reserve'.
Gaining a feel for how much traction reserve is left is how a noob becomes a racer.
BikeMikeAZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2014, 10:07 AM   #1550
Jon_PDX
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Clackamas, OR - USA
Oddometer: 1,108
Six Secrets to Avoiding Left-turners

I got this in a news letter a few days ago and wanted to share the info here.

Six Secrets to Avoiding Left-turners
http://www.soundrider.com/current/14...t_Turners.aspx

It was written by By David L. Hough.

For those that do not know who he is, here is a quick bio…

-----
David L. Hough ("huff”) is a veteran motorcyclist and journalist, with more than a million miles of riding experience over 48 years. Dave was inducted into the AMA Hall of Fame in 2009 in recognition of his efforts toward improving motorcyclist skills and knowledge. He is the author of several highly respected skills books, including Proficient Motorcycling and The Good Rider.
-----

Enjoy and stay safe out there,

Jon…
__________________
2003 Nighthawk 750
Past Bikes.....Check with my Wife.....I've lost count :-)
Jon_PDX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2014, 10:17 AM   #1551
catweasel67
Still a B.A.N
 
catweasel67's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Vienna, Austria
Oddometer: 8,176
For some reason I can't quote Jon but that article he links makes a very good point about practicing emergency/aggressive braking. It's something I've slacked off in over the, well, last 20 years to be honest, and whilst my vigilance has improved I honestly don't know how quickly I could bring my beast to a halt. I'll be adding that to my rides from now on I think.
__________________
Planning NA 2010 NA 2010
Adriatic Loop August 09 Mandello Guzzi Protest Sept 09
"I've got the key to the gates of paradise...but I've got too many legs!!" Jeff
Guns don't kill people, people kill people but people with guns manage to kill more people than people without.
catweasel67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2014, 10:30 AM   #1552
MeinMotorrad
Beastly Adventurer
 
MeinMotorrad's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Location: Between Velez Rubio and Huercal Overa, Spain.
Oddometer: 1,104
As well as practicing braking it's nice to go for a ride sometimes and try to reduce the amount of braking you do - only for junctions etc. not corners, makes for smoother riding.
__________________
'12 KTM 690 Enduro R
MeinMotorrad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2014, 10:48 AM   #1553
LittleRedToyota
Yinzer
 
LittleRedToyota's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Pittsburgh
Oddometer: 2,232
that was an excellent article. the best part about it was that it focused on putting yourself in a position to ensure your own safety.

imho, too many riders focus on trying to get drivers to see them and trying to influence what drivers do. it's obviously not bad to be more visible, but you don't actually have any control over what other people perceive or do. you do have control over what you do, though.

better to focus on giving yourself an escape route, room to swerve, room to brake, not being in a bad spot at a bad time, etc. and ride a nimble bike and practice exploiting that nimbleness.
__________________
2009 KTM 450 xc-w (plated)
2009 DRZ400s
LittleRedToyota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2014, 11:17 AM   #1554
catweasel67
Still a B.A.N
 
catweasel67's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Location: Vienna, Austria
Oddometer: 8,176
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleRedToyota View Post
that was an excellent article. the best part about it was that it focused on putting yourself in a position to ensure your own safety.

imho, too many riders focus on trying to get drivers to see them and trying to influence what drivers do. it's obviously not bad to be more visible, but you don't actually have any control over what other people perceive or do. you do have control over what you do, though.

better to focus on giving yourself an escape route, room to swerve, room to brake, not being in a bad spot at a bad time, etc. and ride a nimble bike and practice exploiting that nimbleness.
+1 - I firmly believe that hi-viz gear is often worn to the detriment of the rider - it makes them feel more visible and that they can relax more than they otherwise would. It'd probably make me feel the same way tbh. I'm not a fan. I ride as if I'm invisible and I make every effort to make other road users aware of my existence and, if I'm unsure that they know I'm there, I plan accordingly.

Anyway, back to noob tips - 20+ years ago, in a land far far away, when I was learning ago my instructor demonstrated to the class how a bike's basic traction worked by first standing the bike vertical and having us eyeball the contact patch and then leaning it over and having us repeat the same exercise. There wasn't a visible difference and it gave a degree of reassurance to those of us who'd never ridden before. It's a surprisingly simple way to install confidence in the newbie. (bear in mind this is at the walk around the bike stage whilst holding it upright).
__________________
Planning NA 2010 NA 2010
Adriatic Loop August 09 Mandello Guzzi Protest Sept 09
"I've got the key to the gates of paradise...but I've got too many legs!!" Jeff
Guns don't kill people, people kill people but people with guns manage to kill more people than people without.
catweasel67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2014, 11:47 AM   #1555
Jon_PDX
Beastly Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: Clackamas, OR - USA
Oddometer: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by catweasel67 View Post
For some reason I can't quote Jon but that article he links makes a very good point about practicing emergency/aggressive braking. It's something I've slacked off in over the, well, last 20 years to be honest, and whilst my vigilance has improved I honestly don't know how quickly I could bring my beast to a halt. I'll be adding that to my rides from now on I think.
I'm just as guilty about practicing emergency/aggressive braking. When I get a bike one of the first things I do is take it to an empty parking lot and get use to how it handles, including the brakes. But then I have a tendency to forget to do it on a regular basis.

So my tip is….

At the very least, once a year a rider (beginner or veteran) should take their bike to someplace safe, like a empty parking lot, and practice all the basic avoidance maneuvers including emergency/aggressive braking.

Where I live I will do those things at the beginning of the riding season after not riding my bike during the winter.

It's also a good time to practice riding as slow as you can to build your "slow speed" skills so you don't drop your bike in a parking lot in front of your friends

Jon…
__________________
2003 Nighthawk 750
Past Bikes.....Check with my Wife.....I've lost count :-)
Jon_PDX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2014, 01:25 PM   #1556
Siper2
Slowpoke
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Oddometer: 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noone View Post
Have you watched Ride Like A Pro DVDs? They are pretty informative.
Yes, several of them! Good info to have. I did alright in BRC, with left-hand turns anyway. Terrible with right-handers; it's the whole deal with trying to not throttle, just use the friction zone in 1st while the right hand is tucked in close. Odd position.
Siper2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2014, 11:36 AM   #1557
DaLunk
Confused and Bemused
 
DaLunk's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2014
Location: Down in Leatherwood
Oddometer: 600
To add to the question of practice, all professional riders regularly practice nearly every aspect of their riding, right up to the last day of their career. There is a good reason for that...even the best still have things to learn and things to improve upon.
__________________
Skating on the thin ice of modern life.
DaLunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2014, 07:41 PM   #1558
Webstermark
n00b
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Oddometer: 9
More fun to ride a slow motorcycle fast than a fast motorcycle slow....
Webstermark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 09:56 AM   #1559
TDubLady
n00b
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Location: East County, San Diego
Oddometer: 1
WEAR YOUR GEAR!! Don't ever think it's too hot, or you won't look cool, or that it's going to be an easy ride so you don't need it!
You never know when a mechanical malfunction or an idiot may come up-and even going slow, falling down HURTS!!
It's not worth the risk of being unable to ride for weeks because you've skipped your gear!!
TDubLady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2014, 01:57 PM   #1560
eatpasta
Lawnmower Target
 
eatpasta's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Location: Santa Barbara, Ca
Oddometer: 10,169
Practice, in a casual environment with experienced riders
__________________
We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.
T. S. Eliot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnszilla
I was SO high, I could have hunted duck with a rake
Quote:
Originally Posted by VxZeroKnots View Post
MX stuff isn't my cup of tea, but falling down the side of a mountain is
eatpasta is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 05:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014