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Old 07-31-2014, 08:52 PM   #1636
snacks
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Thanks all for the info!
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Old 08-01-2014, 01:11 AM   #1637
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjv View Post
Nah its just a kidney belt they wear. On top of their t-shirts, that being their only protection besides the helmet obviously. Must be a local Berlin thing then. Just recently moved here and started riding so cant really compare, but tend to see this daily. Just glad to hear that it is not more common thing.
It's pretty common. I see it a lot in the UK, Europe and in the US. Makes no sense to me.
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Old 08-01-2014, 05:53 AM   #1638
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Maybe it's just there to help with back pain?
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Old 08-01-2014, 05:24 PM   #1639
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Maybe it's just there to help with back pain?
It is fairly common for cruiser riders (especially hardtails) to need some support.
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Old 08-04-2014, 06:42 PM   #1640
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I have not read the entire thread but a few key points

25 percent of motorcycle accidents happen do to unskilled uneducated riders.
I would be willing to bet it is at least double that but thati s what is confirmed according to the hurt report.

Try not to ride at night, you have decreased visibility and in rural areas critters abound.

Ride with at least one finger covering your front brake at all times if possible, but especially in traffic or in rural areas and times when critters are most likely.

Ride slower than the speed limit in those areas and in decreased visibility.

Bright colors saves lives.

Nothing is certain and nothing wil guarantee your safety, but you can do many things to increase your odds of survival, the same as any activity.
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Old 08-06-2014, 08:47 AM   #1641
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I would point out an interesting statistic I learned a while back.... there is a huge bump in accidents among not the newest riders (because they're often extra careful) and not the longer riders (because they've got a bunch of experience and have learned better) but in that 2-5 years riding area. You know the one, where you don't feel like a noob anymore, you think you're an expert, and you start pushing that confidence and envelope until it too often breaks. So the lesson is don't get overconfident after a few years, m'kay? It'll bite ya!
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Old 08-06-2014, 09:23 AM   #1642
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Isn't there always a reason to keep yourself in check? No matter the category?

When you're new, you lack talent.
When you're getting confident, don't overdo it.
When you're really experienced, it becomes an odds game the more miles you ride, so you must continue to stay sharp and alert.

Didn't screw up today? Don't worry, there's always tomorrow.
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Old 08-07-2014, 09:08 AM   #1643
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A week ago I was on my way to work, late, and pushing it on a clear back road when the back wheel locked. It released almost straight away and cruised into a petrol station wondering why? Turns out oil was low. I got a small small taste of what could happen if the engine runs hot and sizes up.

Simple tip - don't negect the oil or any fluid on the bike its enough to worry about Everything else on the road then have your own machine fail
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Old 08-07-2014, 02:29 PM   #1644
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Old 08-07-2014, 09:56 PM   #1645
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zender View Post
After reading through a few dozen pages in this thread I'm left wondering; what are you guys actually taught in driving lessons?! Just about every single advice in here was already mentioned by my instructors. Just to name a few:

- Countersteering
- 2 second distance
- slow in, fast out
- look through corners, you bike goes to where you look. (So don't panic and look at the curb you're about to hit, because then you will hit it.)
- always keep power on the rear wheel, especially in corners
- cages do not see you
- use big vehicles as "shields" against other traffic (but watch at for them as well, they don't see you)
- Emergency braking and manoeuvring
- Always be able to stop within the distance that you can see and is clear.
- Be extra careful around gas stations, corners and roundabouts there will often have "extra" gas/oil on the road.
- Always ride with your lights on
- Use both brakes, and be aware that most braking power will come from your front wheel
- Manhole covers can be slippery
- Do a "lifesaver" check if you deviate from your current line. (That is, is you change lanes, make a turn, or overtake, check that dead spot your mirrors can't see, about 6 feet behind you and to the side you are turning towards)
- If you are going to change speed (both braking AND speeding up) check your mirrors first.

.... and greet other riders, even if they don't greet back.

But quite seriously, what DO you guys get taught, if the above stuff is not handled in driving lessons? Here in The Netherlands we actually have three tests we need to take: "Theory" (that is, highway code, rules, some basics about motorcycle technology), "Vehicle control" (emergency braking, slalom, parking, emergency manoeuvres, slow riding) and finally "Road riding" (Show that you can skillfully and sensibly can take part in traffic, for half an hour, you drive round town and the highway with a exterminator riding behind you telling you where to go via in-ear radio, and observing your every move.)

After you passed, you have the basics down, but then the learning really starts, obviously. All in, it is no unusual to need about 20 hours of driving lessons, or even more if you don't already have your car licence.
I have to go with Zender. Doing Q-Ride assessment in Oz I was not nervous but had some trepidation about it. The 3 sections above were covered, theory, practical, road ride in one assessment course.

The key message was it's up to you to ride in a way that avoids accidents, be it leaving an appropriate gap, lane positioning in different situations, or slowing down more when needed, and awareness of who is around you, where you are riding into and making shoulder/head checks before merging or turning. Having the instructor say that it is is simple as this was helpful and I already had enough motorbike (offroad) and traffic experience to get it done.
The tricky bit is applying all of the above in changing situations.

The best thing I learnt was to look further through ahead, the more time I had to react, the smoother I was.

Don't believe everything you read on the internet and over analyse your riding.
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Old 08-08-2014, 05:40 PM   #1646
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zender View Post
After reading through a few dozen pages in this thread I'm left wondering; what are you guys actually taught in driving lessons?! Just about every single advice in here was already mentioned by my instructors. Just to name a few:
- use big vehicles as "shields" against other traffic (but watch at for them as well, they don't see you)
- always keep power on the rear wheel, especially in corners
Might want to seriously rethink those, especially the second one.

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Old 08-09-2014, 01:23 AM   #1647
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Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
Might want to seriously rethink those, especially the second one.
What's wrong with them?
The first one can be useful when going through an intersection, and the latter helps keep traction in corners...
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Old 08-09-2014, 04:21 AM   #1648
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Originally Posted by opticalmace View Post
What's wrong with them?
The first one can be useful when going through an intersection, and the latter helps keep traction in corners...
So you sit behind a big truck and feel safe that people will see the truck. Yes they're far more likely to see the truck/van or car than some piddly small motorcycle, that's the very trouble. The only thing a driver waiting at the intersection or worse the driver coming from the opposite direction and wanting to turn across the traffic will see, is one bloody great big truck. They make their decision that as soon as the truck passes they will turn, they are committed and act, straight into the following 'invisible' motorcycle. Even at a two second gap your essentially invisible behind a large vehicle to anyone forward of the vehicle. Cars not seeing a motorcycle because it is 'hidden' (both real and illusion) by the vehicles in front of it is one of the major reasons for motorcycles getting taken out. A beginner rider is far safer out in the open, riding defensively, with attention given to maintaining their own high visibility to forward traffic.

The merits or otherwise of a statement "always keep power on the back wheel in corners" was debated to death in the thread on MSF and trail braking. I see no value in covering it again.

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Old 08-09-2014, 09:32 AM   #1649
opticalmace
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnCW View Post
So you sit behind a big truck and feel safe that people will see the truck. Yes they're far more likely to see the truck/van or car than some piddly small motorcycle, that's the very trouble. The only thing a driver waiting at the intersection or worse the driver coming from the opposite direction and wanting to turn across the traffic will see, is one bloody great big truck. They make their decision that as soon as the truck passes they will turn, they are committed and act, straight into the following 'invisible' motorcycle. Even at a two second gap your essentially invisible behind a large vehicle to anyone forward of the vehicle. Cars not seeing a motorcycle because it is 'hidden' (both real and illusion) by the vehicles in front of it is one of the major reasons for motorcycles getting taken out. A beginner rider is far safer out in the open, riding defensively, with attention given to maintaining their own high visibility to forward traffic.

The merits or otherwise of a statement "always keep power on the back wheel in corners" was debated to death in the thread on MSF and trail braking. I see no value in covering it again.
I guess I just interpreted it differently. For the first, one thing that comes to mind is that maybe it could be advantageous in certain situations to match the pace or at least timing of a vehicle in an adjacent lane that is going through an intersection with you for the visibility. The latter, in the context of it being a thread for beginners, I don't think they would be concerned about trail braking anyway... but I suppose taking out that first word would be appropriate.

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Old 08-09-2014, 02:01 PM   #1650
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And leave extra room in front of you when following a vehicle you can't see through or around (like a truck.) If something happens in front of them that causes them to slam on their brakes you will have little notice of it.
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